10 Ways to Change a Higher Ed IT Culture

June 24th, 2015

By Michael Hart, Campus Technology

The information technology services department at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse transformed its culture via a simple, step-by-step process. “We knew it wasn’t going to be an easy, quick fix,” Jorstad said, now five years into the transformation. “You have to strategize to do it.” That’s why Jorstad and his team came up with a process they believe has successfully turned their organization’s 40-plus-member staff around. Today, he said, the rapport between the university and the ITS team has never been better.

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/06/11/10-ways-to-change-a-higher-ed-it-culture.aspx

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Google, Udacity Offering Android Development Nanodegree With Promising Career Path

June 24th, 2015

by iSchoolGuide

Google and Udacity have teamed up to offer the first Android development nanodegree, which would take 9 to 12 months to complete. Students who were able to complete the course and pass the examination would have the chance to become part of Google’s team as certified Android developers. The Android Nanodegree will take 9 to 12 months to complete, and consists of six courses. Fortune.com reported that Google and Udacity will soon introduce Nanodegrees on Cloud Computing, Web Development, and Entrepreneurship.

http://www.ischoolguide.com/articles/14448/20150612/google-udacity-offering-android-development-nanodegree-promising-career-path.htm

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6 Essential Tips for Planning an Effective Online Course

June 24th, 2015

by Kunal Chawla, EdSurge

Most edtech conversations often focus on “tech”— the new apps, data systems, assessments and other technologies. But the “ed” discussions — particularly the art of teaching with these tools—are often remiss. Over the last two years, I taught online courses on Python programming and iPhone App Development at Udacity; over 100,000 students registered for them. In the first of my four-part series, 20 Tips for Teaching Online, I’ll focus on several aspects of online course creation, including planning, techniques for teaching, community building and assessments. My hope with this piece is to contribute to a conversation on how to teach more effectively in an online space and what we can learn from research and expert teachers in physical classrooms. Let’s begin!

https://www.edsurge.com/n/2015-06-11-6-essential-tips-for-planning-an-effective-online-course

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Athabasca University faces insolvency, president reassures students

June 23rd, 2015
by the CBC
Alberta’s online university is facing a financial crisis, but the president is reassuring students that the institution will not be closing down. According to an internal report, Athabasca University (AU) will be insolvent in two years. The report was prepared by a task force struck by Peter MacKinnon, the interim president of the university. Enrolment demographics are behind the university’s troubles, MacKinnon said.  Provincial funding has dropped from covering 80 per cent of operating expenses at Athabasca to closer to 30 per cent. The rest comes from student tuition. And with more and more universities offering online learning, there is even more competition for students.
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Academic Foul: Some Colleges Accused Of Helping Athletes Cheat

June 23rd, 2015

by National Public Radio

Some college athletes are cheating, and the NCAA is cracking down on universities that enable them to do it. Earlier this year, the NCAA came down hard on Syracuse University for academic fraud. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is awaiting its punishment for guiding athletes to enroll in sham classes, among other infractions. Will the University of Texas at Austin be next?

http://spokanepublicradio.org/post/academic-foul-some-colleges-accused-helping-athletes-cheat

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How I setup an online course worth $100k

June 23rd, 2015

by Paul Jarvis, the Next Web

I don’t have a magic bullet for building online courses, but because I’m a cheap bastard, I’ve figured out a way to run a course that makes sense financially, regardless of whether 20 people buy or 2,000. To some, having an affiliate program is necessary. I’ve never bothered with those, simply because if someone’s going to promote my work—they do it because they want to, not because they’re getting paid to. That’s how I promote from others. I don’t have a problem with affiliate programs and know lots of people that make a huge chunk of income from them, it’s just a personal choice on my end not to use them for the products I sell. Below is how I run my own course, The Creative Class, which launched on October 15, 2014. There are at least eight billion ways to create an online course, and lots of great options out there, this is just how mine works.

http://thenextweb.com/entrepreneur/2015/06/13/how-i-setup-a-100k-online-course/

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MOOCs Emerge As Disruptors To Corporate Learning

June 22nd, 2015

by Jeanne Meister, Forbes

Companies have discovered the power of the MOOCs as a new way to design and deliver online learning, where learners become peer reviewers, collaborate with each other, are highly engaged in watching short videos, participate in threaded discussion groups and some arrange local meetups to continue their learning. And for those learners who complete all the assignments, there is the ability to earn a certificate from a university and post this on their LinkedIn LNKD -1.02% profile. The bar for corporate learning has been raised and the revolution there is now just beginning. Large organizations such as Microsoft MSFT and Tenaris are piloting their own custom created MOOCs. Others such as Bank of America BAC and Qualcomm are developing a strategy to curate publicly available MOOCs aligned to their core competencies.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeannemeister/2015/06/10/moocs-emerge-as-disruptors-to-corporate-learning/

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Community college online classes lag behind in success, report says

June 22nd, 2015

By Josh Dulaney, Long Beach Press Telegram

Roughly 625,000 students are now enrolled in community college online classes throughout California. Only about 60 percent of them successfully complete the classes, with completion rates for black and Latino students even lower, according to a report by the Public Policy Institute of California, a nonpartisan think tank based in San Francisco. “Most students do successfully complete online courses, but it’s still a pretty high failure rate,” said Hans Johnson, PPIC senior fellow and co-author of the report. The report, titled “Successful Online Courses in California’s Community Colleges,” looked at data from the CCC’s Chancellor’s Office and found that the median passage rate was about 10 percentage points higher for traditional courses, at 69 percent, than for online courses, which was 59 percent.

http://www.presstelegram.com/social-affairs/20150610/community-college-online-classes-lag-behind-in-success-report-says

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Redefining the Faculty Paradigm

June 22nd, 2015

by Inside Higher Ed

Most people agree that faculty performance evaluations should be based on more than student feedback, grants and publication counts. But what does a more complete evaluation process look like? And how would a more progressive department function? The New American Colleges and Universities’ answer is Redefining the Paradigm: Faculty Models to Support Student Learning. The new monograph is based on new faculty evaluation models at NAC&U member institutions, and pushes other colleges and universities to rethink traditional department structures and processes to better support student learning. The monograph promotes the development of “holistic departments” that reject the arguably outdated scholarship-teaching-service faculty evaluation model in favor of processes that are more fluid and responsive to the changing faculty role and departmentwide needs. It also promotes active learning, in which professors are not “sages on the stage” but rather guides in research and other experiential learning. The Teagle Foundation supported the project.

https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2015/06/11/redefining-faculty-paradigm

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Millennials prefer learning opportunities over higher pay

June 21st, 2015

by Human Resources

A new study from EdAssist™ found Millennials prioritise tangible learning opportunities over salary levels when applying for a job. More than four out of 10 (41%) of Millennials stated they would choose a job with a potential for regular pay raises. However, more than half (59%) chose a job with a strong potential for professional development. In fact, Millennials were found to be so interested in development that most stated they are willing to make personal sacrifices to learn while working.

http://www.humanresourcesonline.net/millennials-prefer-learning-opportunities-higher-pay/

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7 Warning Signs an Online Degree is a Scam

June 21st, 2015

By Devon Haynie, US News

For prospective online students, searching for a degree program can sometimes feel like being adrift in the wilderness, with no map and no way of gauging the intention of approaching strangers. Students have so many online programs to choose from – some with promises of quick, effortless degrees that seem too good to be true. Unfortunately, they sometimes are. And students who are duped by the schemes are left with a hole in their wallet and no legitimate credential. While anyone can fall prey to an online degree scam, international students and first generation college students can be particularly vulnerable to degree mills, says Karen Pedersen, chief knowledge officer for the Online Learning Consortium, a group dedicated to advancing the quality of online learning. “If you don’t know what you don’t know, it can seem like a really intricate maze,” she says.

http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/articles/2015/06/09/7-warning-signs-an-online-degree-is-a-scam

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Report Finds Successful Online 2-Year College Courses in California

June 21st, 2015

by Inside Higher Ed

The Public Policy Institute of California released a report Tuesday identifying successful online courses in the state’s community colleges. Success was defined as having at least 70 percent of students earning a passing grade, and if student performance is at least as good as face-to-face versions of the same course. The study also defined success as when students in an online course continue to do well in subsequent same-subject classes either online or in a traditional setting. The study found about 11 percent of online courses in 2013-14 were “highly successful” and they varied widely from one another. The courses were successful due to their design and the way they were delivered to students, although there wasn’t a systematic pattern in online course success.

https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2015/06/10/report-finds-successful-online-2-year-college-courses-california

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Anyone can sign up to learn online about Iowa caucuses with new Caucus MOOC

June 20th, 2015

By Lily Abromeit, The Gazette

Steffen Schmidt’s email and phone inboxes are flooded every day with questions about the Iowa caucuses. Schmidt, a professor of political science at Iowa State University, started to realize there’s a large number of people who don’t understand the caucuses and the impact they can have in deciding the next president. To help, he created ISU’s first MOOC — short for massive open online course — that will focus on how the caucuses came to be what their future may hold.

http://thegazette.com/subject/news/education/higher-education/anyone-can-sign-up-to-learn-online-about-iowa-caucuses-with-new-caucus-mooc-20150608

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Cybersecurity Online Course Addressing Advanced Cybercrime and Security Threats

June 20th, 2015

by MIT

MIT Professional Education will offer its first online course on Cybersecurity to a global audience of professionals from Sept. 15 – Oct. 27, 2015. This course, featuring 14 faculty from the world-renowned MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), is offered in support of a campus-wide MIT initiative to counter the real and damaging threat of cybersecurity attacks facing organizations around the globe. Additional sessions of the course will also be offered from Nov. 10 – Dec. 22, 2015 and Jan. 12 – Feb. 23, 2016. The course launching on Sept. 15 is being offered at an introductory price of $545.

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20150609005477/en/MIT-Professional-Education-Launches-Online-Cybersecurity-Global#.VXeAxdJViko

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2-Year Colleges in Calif. Hope Online-Course Upgrades Will Improve Completion

June 20th, 2015

by Meg Bernhard, Chronicle of Higher Ed

Representatives of the California Community Colleges on Monday announced upgrades in their online-course system, the California Virtual Campus, that are intended to improve students’ completion rates. The college system said the effort was designed to make it easier for students to find courses that fulfill transfer requirements and create pathways to the California State University system. Among the improvements are a design that works better on mobile phones and includes an improved search function. The community-college system also has increased efforts to improve the quality of its online courses, to better prepare students to take such courses, and to train instructors to teach them. Those efforts fall broadly under the system’s Online Education Initiative.

http://chronicle.com/blogs/ticker/2-year-colleges-in-calif-hope-online-course-upgrades-will-improve-completion/100429

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The Forces Behind The Decline Of For-Profit Colleges

June 19th, 2015

by ANYA KAMENETZ, NPR

Barring a last-minute legal decision, as of July 1, the nation’s for-profit colleges are going to be subject to a new Education Department rule known as gainful employment. That is: Do students end up earning enough to pay off their loans? A trade group of career colleges is suing to stop the rule, but this is far from the only monkey on the sector’s back. As recently as 2010, these schools enrolled one in nine college students. Today, some are shutting down, cutting back, tanking in the stock market, even going bankrupt. The bellwether was the giant Corinthian Colleges a year ago, but many others are in trouble as well. Even the University of Phoenix, which five years ago had 460,000 students, has seen that number fall by half.

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2015/06/08/412024783/the-forces-behind-the-decline-of-for-profit-colleges

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University of Arizona will offer bachelor’s degrees online

June 19th, 2015

by Carol Ann Alaimo, Tucson.com

When Starbucks recently went searching for a school to provide online education for baristas and selected ASU, it didn’t look twice at the University of Arizona. The UA had nothing to offer the world’s largest coffee chain since none of its bachelor’s degrees is available online. Now that’s about to change. After years of delay, the UA is launching a new chapter in its history by offering some of its undergraduate degrees over the Internet, beginning with the fall semester.

http://tucson.com/news/local/education/university-of-arizona-will-offer-bachelor-s-degrees-online/article_455d41b9-6f30-5f19-b6ee-e3b62e76445f.html

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Can Digital Badges Help Encourage Professors to Take Teaching Workshops?

June 19th, 2015

by Jeffrey R. Young, Chronicle of Higher Ed

A few colleges are trying a new incentive to get professors to participate in professional-development workshops: digital badges. The idea of offering badges has become popular in education-technology circles in the past few years, in most cases as an alternative to a traditional college diploma, or even as a different way of giving grades in courses. The goal is to create an easy way for people to show employers they have attained a given skill. After all, who ever looks at a college transcript?

http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/can-digital-badges-help-encourage-professors-to-take-teaching-workshops/56901

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Gov. Scott Walker Calls Possibility of Taking Online Courses to Finish Degree in White House ‘Interesting’

June 18th, 2015

By BENJAMIN BELL, ABC News

Gov. Scott Walker, Wisconsin’s Republican governor who is considering a bid for the White House, told ABC News that the possibility of taking online courses to finish his college degree — if he were to win the presidential election and found himself at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue in early 2017 — is “interesting.” “I’ve got two sons who very, very well, before the next election, at least one of them, may have his degree and the other would be just a year out,” Walker told ABC News’ Jon Karl. “Part of it was I wanted to make sure they went through and got what they needed,” he said.

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/gov-scott-walker-calls-possibility-taking-online-courses/story?id=31593687

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Ohio School District Bets on Technology in Creating New Learning Model

June 18th, 2015

By CAROLINE PORTER, Wall Street Journal

At Reynoldsburg schools, middle-school students choose among four academies to attend for high school. The academies specialize in engineering and design; the arts; business and law; and health sciences. There are no desks permanently lined up in rows and, in one building, no bells signaling the end of class. College isn’t some far-off place: Students can take classes from a community college on school premises. Most students don’t even have to take gym in high school. At the heart of the overhaul that is aimed at all grades is a personalized learning model combining computer-based and in-person instruction that the district says has held down costs, sustained above-average test scores and put students in greater control of their learning.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/ohio-school-district-bets-on-technology-in-creating-new-learning-model-1433712447

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Blended Online And Campus Learning Embraced As B-Schools Face Disruption

June 18th, 2015

by Seb Murray, Business Because

Evolution of online learning forces business schools to rethink how they deliver content, as competition with innovative digital providers heats up. The digital revolution in education is in full swing, spearheaded by online companies deploying technology that is disrupting the sector with courses on everything from data analytics to advanced accounting. Digitally focused education companies such as Coursera, the Mooc or massive open online course developer and 2U, whose tech powers business school programs on the web, have emerged in the past decade along with dozens more who are shaking up the traditional university. The evolution of online learning has forced business schools to rethink how they deliver their content. Tech has enabled schools to provide flexible learning solutions by beaming lectures directly to computers and mobile devices.

http://www.businessbecause.com/news/mba-distance-learning/3305/blended-online-and-campus-learning-embraced

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