Online Learning Update

December 6, 2017

Study Explores Social Media and Mobile Use in Flipped Learning And Help-Seeking

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Henry Kronk, eLearning Inside

Many things have changed since the ‘90s, especially regarding online education and education technology. Some professors have made incredible commitments to online presence, such as Al Filreis who maintains a massive online open course (MOOC) version of his poetry class at the University of Pennsylvania. He and his team respond to students usually within the hour. Professor Ashok Goel at Georgia Tech created a teaching assistant chatbot for his computer science courses. But by and large, these efforts are fantastic anomalies. The issues of isolation for online learners remain today. “[S]tudents suffer isolation when they study in an online environment and this situation is often considered to be unavoidable,” Professor Wen-Li Chyr writes.

https://news.elearninginside.com/study-explores-social-media-mobile-use-flipped-learning-help-seeking/

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Why Digitizing Traditional Learning Isn’t Innovation

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

by Matthew Lynch, tech Edvocate

Technology has been hailed by many as the answer to every problem in education. Digital technology is supposed to allow students to learn in entirely new ways, bringing new innovations to every classroom. But this isn’t always the case. In fact, many EdTech programs and tools are simply digitizing traditional teaching—and it isn’t innovation. Instead, teachers should be looking for ways to use technology to get students active. That doesn’t mean physically active, but mentally active. With technology, it’s possible to get students to do more critical thinking, evaluating, and creating. Students can take responsibility for their own learning.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/digitizing-traditional-teaching-isnt-innovation/

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Massachusetts Commits to Digital Education and Lifelong Learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Henry Kronk, eLearning Inside

Earlier this month, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker said that he plans to establish a Commission on Digital Innovation and Lifelong Learning. The intent of the commission is to sound the depths of the current state of employment and the Massachusetts workforce. Baker hopes the commission will provide insight on how to create conditions and incentives for Massachusetts residents to more easily receive education and workforce training in growing fields. The announcement occurred at the recent “Governor’s Online Digital Learning Summit,” which was hosted by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The summit brought together education administrators from the state government along with businesses and education institutions.

Massachusetts Commits to Digital Education and Lifelong Learning

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December 5, 2017

3 ed tech trends transforming higher ed

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Shalina Chatlani, Education Dive

Tech-savvy schools recognizing the world of work is changing dramatically are investing in more tools to better prepare students for employment. In an interview with Microsoft VP for worldwide education Anthony Salcito for Ed Tech Magazine, data collection tools to enhance student retention efforts and artificial intelligence to generate trends and projections with the collected data on student outcomes, as well as create more efficiencies in the management of campus life, were identified as two emerging trends.  Institutions are also investing in collaboration technologies that can close digital skills gaps among students and better prepare them to enter a more technologically entrenched world of work, such as applications that allow students to better collaborate with each other outside of the classroom.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/3-ed-tech-trends-transforming-higher-ed/511938/

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The Ultimate MOOC Handbook #infographic

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Accredited Schools Online

MOOCs are online courses available to anyone with a computer and Internet connection. They offer students a way to learn in a setting similar to an online class, but are usually loosely structured and can be accessed without paying tuition or committing to an academic program. Whether a student should sign up for a MOOC will depend on his or her academic and professional goals. To learn just for fun or to get a certificate for a small fee, MOOCs are ideal.

https://www.accreditedschoolsonline.org/resources/moocs/

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Universities Mine Twitter to Troubleshoot Tech, Support Students

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by Meghan Bogardus Cortez, EdTech
By monitoring the social media platform, higher ed leaders can react to early warning signs. Twitter is often stigmatized as a haven for internet trolls and fake news. But with 21 percent of U.S. adults on Twitter, the social media platform can be a great tool for university outreach and customer service. Monitoring tweets about university services can act as an early warning sign of problems that will soon need to be addressed. At the University of Georgia, a large number of mean tweets about the state of the campus Wi-Fi actually prompted the university to roll out an infrastructure upgrade, Campus Technology reports. Arizona State University, which recently launched a truly innovative 24/7 year-round help desk, regularly monitors tweets that mention “ASU” and “Wi-Fi” to quickly connect students with IT support.

https://edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2017/11/universities-mine-twitter-troubleshoot-tech-support-students

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December 4, 2017

GE Will Interview Any Massachusetts Resident Who Completes an edX MicroMasters Program in Certain Fields

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

By Henry Kronk, eLearning Inside

The announcement was made at the recent “Governor’s Online Digital Learning Summit,” which went down at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) last month. The summit brought together businesses, higher education institutions, and the state government headed by Governor Charlie Baker to discuss the future of education for both K-12-age and adult residents. Paul Fama, a representative of GE, said that anyone who completes an edX MicroMasters program in supply chain management, cybersecurity, cloud computing, or artificial intelligence and resides in the state will be guaranteed at least an interview.

https://news.elearninginside.com/ge-will-interview-massachusetts-resident-completes-edx-micromasters-program-certain-fields/

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Is DeVos Devaluing Degrees?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Andrew Kreighbaum, Inside Higher Ed
Education secretary calls for more emphasis on work-force training. Many experts — including those focused on careers — say general education matters more than she suggests. The Trump administration’s higher education policy to date has consisted largely of undoing what it inherited — rolling back, for instance, ambitious Obama era regulations on for-profit colleges and campus policies on sexual assault. Observers looking for an affirmative, forward-looking agenda have been hard-pressed to find much so far. But Education Secretary Betsy DeVos this month provided as a clear a sense as observers have yet seen of her vision for her department’s role in, and agenda for, postsecondary education, with a set of comments signaling a shift in emphasis from education to training. In two separate forums this month, she said students have for years received a message that “the only path for a successful life” is through a four-year degree.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/11/28/devos-says-us-has-emphasized-four-year-degrees-expense-work-force-training

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UMass names former Pearson executive to oversee online courses

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

By Don Seiffert, Boston Business Journal

The University of Massachusetts has named the former president of Pearson North America to head up its online course offerings. Don Kilburn has been named CEO of UMassOnline, a venture that was launched in 2001. Last year UMassOnline had 75,565 students enrolled, up 7 percent from the previous year, and revenues of more than $100 million for the first time. Online enrollment at UMass has risen 39 percent in the past five years, as revenues have grown 47 percent in the same time. Kilburn, 61, has been president of North America at London-based Pearson plc since January 2014, according to Bloomberg. While Pearson North America has its headquarters in New York City, Kilburn lived in Massachusetts.

https://www.bizjournals.com/boston/news/2017/11/27/umass-names-former-pearson-executive-to-oversee.html

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December 3, 2017

Teaching Adult Students with Considerable Professional Expertise

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:07 am

By: Eileen F. Schiffer, Faculty Focus

Trends toward increased enrollment of non-traditional students are expected to continue (Stringer, 2015). Discussions about nontraditional college students often highlight some of the challenges our adult students face, such as balancing work, family, and school commitments, overcoming previous academic patterns that no longer serve them, and adapting to new approaches to learning (such as online classes.) The flip side, though, is that many non-traditional students bring a wealth of personal and professional experience to their pursuit of a new degree, which serves to the benefit their academic cohort (Stringer, 2015). Many non-traditional adult students are “career enhancers” (Pelletier, 2010) By 2021, it’s expected that nearly 7 million postsecondary students will be attending part time, and enrollment of students over age 35 will increase 25%. The total number of master’s degrees awarded is projected to increase 34% and doctoral degrees are expected to increase by 24% (Hussar & Bailey, 2013).

https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-and-learning/teaching-adult-students-considerable-professional-expertise/

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Student Demand for eLearning Continues to Grow

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

by Cait Etherington, eLearning Inside

As reported in this year’s ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, for four years running, the number of students preferring a blended learning environment that includes “some to mostly online components” has increased while students preferring a face-to-face only learning environment has continued to decline. With student demand growing, in 2018, it seems likely that both colleges and universities will continue to scale up their online offerings.

https://news.elearninginside.com/elearning-will-grow-higher-ed-2018/

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Online learning can ease economic inequality

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by Boston Globe Editorial

Digital learning is often seen a complement to sit-in-the-classroom colleges courses, but at a recent conference at MIT, experts convincingly portrayed innovative online offerings as a key tool for helping those of modest means move up the economic ladder.  College degrees pay off. But low-income students often face family, financial, or work constraints that keep them from pursuing higher education full-time or even on a regular nights-and-weekend basis. Citing the fact that 36 million Americans have some college but no degree, keynote speaker Ted Mitchell, president of the American Council on Education and a former federal undersecretary of education, said the American higher education system is “leaving too many students along the side of the road.”

https://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/editorials/2017/11/27/online-learning-can-ease-economic-inequality/Z4TYVHIX6GuSR7pYjEopnK/story.html

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December 2, 2017

Teacher ed programs turn to virtual reality

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:27 am

by Pat Donachie, Education Dive

Some future teachers are using augmented and virtual reality programs to gain classroom experience before they ever lead an actual class, according to University Business. The programs, increasingly in use at institutions throughout the country, offer future teachers the opportunity to fail and learn from mistakes in a “low-stakes” setting, according to Penn State Ed Tech Services Director Kyle Bowen. The virtual classroom students have individualized personalities and react to the instruction of the student in the VR space, and supporters say programs say they can be amended to accommodate for changes in student age, background and subject matter.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/teacher-ed-programs-turn-to-virtual-reality/511608/

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8 Must-have artificial intelligence apps and tools

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

Is your teaching about to be disrupted? The answer is yes, it definitely is! But in a good way. The emergence of artificial intelligence (AI) technology is transforming every aspect of education, from curriculum development all the way to assessment. Do you want to bring some of these cutting-edge advances to your own classroom, but you’re not sure how to do it? Linked below are eight AI tools and apps that are well worth the necessary learning curve.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/8-must-artificial-intelligence-apps-tools/

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Faculty Attitudes About Online Learning Are Changing…Slowly

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

By Cait Etherington, eLearning Inside

While the majority of faculty surveyed by Inside Higher Ed indicate that they have never taught an online course for credit, the survey suggests that this may soon change. Currently, “Forty-two percent of professors say they have taught an online course, and 36 percent have taught a blended or hybrid course,” but “A year ago, 39 percent reported teaching an online course, and in 2013, 30 percent did.” Other key findings concerned support, with the report finding that “Slightly less than half of faculty members say they have received professional development to help design or revise an online or blended course. About one in four say they have worked with instructional designers to create or revise in-person or online courses.” While online teaching is on the rise, the report did find that skepticism remains high.

Faculty Attitudes About Online Learning Are Changing…Slowly

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December 1, 2017

Digitalization and the American workforce

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Mark Muro, Sifan Liu, Jacob Whiton, Siddharth Kulkarni, Brookings

In remaking the U.S. economy and the world of work. The “digitalization of everything” has at once increased the potential of individuals, firms, and society while also contributing to a series of troublesome impacts and inequalities, such as worker pay disparities across many demographics, and the divergence of metropolitan economic outcomes. In light of that, this report presents a detailed analysis of changes in the digital content of 545 occupations covering 90 percent of the U.S. workforce in all industries since 2001. The analysis categorizes U.S. occupations into jobs that require high, medium or low digital skills and tracks the impacts of rapid change.

https://www.brookings.edu/research/digitalization-and-the-american-workforce/

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6 reasons why course visuals are a must for today’s college students

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

BY RYAN EASH, eCampus News

The higher education landscape is shifting and institutions are facing a decline in overall enrollment. Rather than opting for a traditional classroom experience, students today have come to expect greater flexibility in deciding when, where and how to learn. In fact, it is predicted that by 2019 at least 50 percent of all classes will be delivered online and that percentage will only continue to increase. To adjust to student expectations and keep enrollment up, higher education institutions must offer online courses or blended classrooms to compete with other colleges that already have those options. Using technology in the classroom is beneficial as it can serve as a solution for meeting students’ expectations while also keeping enrollment up. For example, instructors can use technology to engage with students through visual communications and learning.

6 reasons why course visuals are a must for today’s college students

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5 innovative strategies to support non-traditional students

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News

A previous Barnes and Noble College study of nearly 800 non-traditional students as a whole revealed that nearly twice as many non-traditional students are at risk of dropping out when compared to traditional peers. The report notes that the number of non-traditional students is projected to increase more than twice as fast as traditional students from 2012 to 2022, according to the CLASP Center for Postsecondary and Economic Success. And because non-traditional students are among the fastest-growing student groups, this means schools face retention challenges. Only 37 percent of at-risk students said they feel confident they will accomplish their educational goals, and 33 percent of those at risk participate in extra-curricular activities, compared to 62 percent of non-traditional students who are not at risk of not graduating.

https://www.ecampusnews.com/campus-administration/strategies-non-traditional-student/

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November 30, 2017

IS E-LEARNING REPLACING FACE-TO-FACE TRAINING?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:08 am

by Jonathan Symcox, Business Cloud
Organisations are looking for ways to maximise the effectiveness of their training while reducing costs. Samantha Caine, client services director at Business Linked Teams, says e-learning can help firms address the challenge of rolling out desired behaviours and skillsets consistently across global workforces. “Organisations need an approach that can overcome language barriers and cultural differences and help them deliver their global business objectives,” she told BusinessCloud. “It’s possible to train sales teams and future leaders of global organisations with e-learning and the rationale for pursuing this path is clear.

http://www.businesscloud.co.uk/news/is-e-learning-replacing-face-to-face-training

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Technology Is Changing The Way We Learn—And Business Schools Need To Adapt

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

by Marco De Novellis, Business Because

Now, more than ever, it’s about having a presence online, and making sure you’re getting your personal brand out there in whatever way you can. Writing articles, sharing content, networking, contributing to communities—all that can elevate your digital footprint and make you look like an expert in your field. As we’re moving into a multigenerational workforce—with millennials in the mix—we’re finding that mindset is becoming as important as skillset. Business school and MBA degrees give you that business mindset.

https://www.businessbecause.com/news/inside-view-top-jobs/4922/technology-changing-learning-business-schools-adapt

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How Professors Can Bring Culturally-Responsive Teaching to Online Courses

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Tina Nazerian, EdSurge

Instructors should make sure students have the opportunity to build their own learning experiences, New Mexico State University Professor Julia Parra argues. She said that one of the ways she implements active participation is through participatory course design in some of her courses, where students take part in brainstorming what the course will look like. She takes the approach of co-designing. After Parra has combined her learning goals and objectives with that of her students, she gives it back to them, and asks them for their ideas for the activities and resources that they could do in the course and assessments. In the end she builds the final syllabus based on their suggestions.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-11-22-how-professors-can-bring-culturally-responsive-teaching-to-online-courses

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