Online Learning Update

June 15, 2017

What you need to know as Gen Z enters the workforce

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:09 am
By Ken Tysiac, Journal of Accountancy

The author of GenZ @ Work, Stillman presents with his 17-year-old son (and Gen Z member) Jonah and is armed with research from three national surveys he has done with members of Gen Z. The first is trait of Gen Z is “Phigital,” which Stillman explains means that the lines between physical and digital have been eliminated. The second Gen Z trait Stillman discussed is a quality he calls “hyper-custom.” Personalized marketing has given them opportunities for customized experiences as consumers. “FOMO” (fear of missing out) was the third Gen Z trait that Stillman discussed. Gen Z members have spent their lives connected to news sources 24 hours a day.

http://www.journalofaccountancy.com/news/2017/may/generation-z-enters-workforce-201716711.html

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Udacity Boosts Projects in Intro to Programming Nanodegree Program

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

By Dian Schaffhauser, eCampus News

Amid news that coding bootcamp graduates are finding work, Udacity has tweaked the formula for its popular introductory course in programming by adding three new projects. The “Intro to Programming” program launched in March 2015. Since then, according to the company, more than 1,600 students from around the world have completed the program, and 3,400 others are currently enrolled. The company has also announced a new pricing model. Started by MOOC pioneer Sebastian Thrum, Udacity offers free courses as well as paid courses that lead to “nanodegrees,” alternative credentials awarded for online training when an individual proves his or her competency.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/featured/featured-on-ecampus-news/technology-digital-5-years/

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3 Steps to Take Before Starting an Online Program

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Olena Reid,US News

Being a prospective online student can be stressful. You may investigate seemingly endless options for programs, and even when you find a perfect match, your journey is still only just beginning. There are a few things prospective students can do to find a best-fit online program that will, at the same time, help them transition into returning to school. Prepare a short self-introduction speech to impress admissions officers and stand out in online classes.

https://www.usnews.com/education/online-learning-lessons/articles/2017-05-26/3-steps-to-take-before-starting-an-online-program

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June 14, 2017

Institutions must think broader when utilizing analytics

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:08 am

by Roger Riddell, Education Dive

Jack Neill, vice president of client services at HelioCampus and former senior director of analytics at University of Maryland University College, says institutions must think “bigger and broader” when it comes to the possibilities of utilizing analytics. Neill writes that when looking to leverage analytics, institutions should ask questions around whether the students being recruited are those most likely to succeed there, what the patterns around degree completion are and how to improve them, and how students can be segmented into subpopulations for better service. Thinking broader in this manner, according to Neill, can help institutions shine light on potentially expensive blind spots that, despite how well-meaning leaders may be, can sometimes only expand the problem.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/institutions-must-think-broader-when-utilizing-analytics/443197/

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Data: For-profits worst at graduating low-income students

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by A. Arnett, Education Dive

New data from the U.S. Department of Education shows private, for-profit institutions do the worst job of graduating Pell-eligible students. While 3 in 4 students at these institutions receive Pell grants, only 16% actually graduate with a bachelor’s degree in six years, and The Hechinger Report’s Jon Marcus and Sarah Butrymowicz noted in their analysis of the report that shorter-term for-profit programs (two years or less) see much greater success with getting these students a higher ed credential. Nonprofit institutions, by comparison, graduate between 50-55%, but they enroll significantly fewer Pell-dependent students.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/data-for-profits-worst-at-graduating-low-income-students/443570/

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After the Hype, Do MOOC Ventures Like edX Still Matter?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

Anant Agarwal Interviewed By Goldie Blumenstyk, Chronicle of Higher Ed

As a nonprofit, you want to have the biggest impact, not necessarily the biggest ROI for investors. You can do things like that. So we give our platform away for free. A second example is that on edX, we are still offering MOOCs, which are courses where people can do the whole learning for free. You may have to pay for a credential, but we still offer MOOCs, and virtually all our courses are MOOCs. Even for a MicroMasters and premium offerings, people can learn completely for free. A lot of the for-profits have pivoted and put up paywalls in their programs. And edX pretty much has and will continue to offer free courses and programs. And as a nonprofit, that certainly reduces the revenue that you can generate. But we have a very long-term horizon.

http://www.chronicle.com/article/After-the-Hype-Do-MOOC/240155

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June 13, 2017

This technology will dominate higher ed within 5 years

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

BY JAMI MORSHED, eCampus News

The desire for a more digital campus has also come hand-in-hand with the rise of the non-traditional student, a population of which is generally characterized by part-time attendance, student swirl, working either full or part time, and taking classes either partly or entirely online. [Read: “Is it time to rethink the term nontraditional student?”] Online learning platforms change the lecture and classroom experience to allow students to connect with the university through a familiar medium–their mobile device. Many forward-thinking colleges are embracing digital strategies to modernize their administrative side as well, such as processes for financial aid, course sign up, campus enrollment, the bursar’s office and others previously operated independently. Digital integration between departments can streamline tasks and make them accessible online to adapt to the needs of remote students, meaning campuses can put the student first and can streamline operations to follow the student journey.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/featured/featured-on-ecampus-news/technology-digital-5-years/

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6 Keys to Working with Vendors in a Next-Gen Enterprise IT World

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

As IT departments become “brokers” rather than single-service providers, vendor management skills are becoming paramount. Here’s how two institutions deal with contracts, vendor relationships and more. When Educause called out “next-generation enterprise IT” as one of its top 10 IT issues in 2017, the higher education technology association also asked members of its advisory board to explain just what’s meant by that. Michael Quiner, CIO at Oregon’s Linn-Benton Community College, says “The new baseline for enterprise IT is to anticipate the needs of the institution and look outside the services and systems traditionally found in the IT department,” Quiner explained. “The new goal of enterprise IT is to make the college’s ‘Christmas list’ a reality by looking beyond what our campus already has on our IT shelves and by becoming a broker instead of a single-service provider.”

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/25/6-keys-to-working-with-vendors-in-a-next-gen-enterprise-it-world.aspx

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Going back to school online

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Tania Kishore Jaleel, Fortune India

Until now, online MOOC courses were mostly popular with students and professionals on a budget looking for an Ivy League education. Thousands of young students took courses in everything from mathematical thinking to mechanics from leading U.S. universities such as Yale or Stanford without ever leaving Indian shores. But, now, leading online course providers such as U.S.-based Coursera and Simplilearn are looking beyond students and talking to the government on digital literacy programmes to help bridge the skill gap in India and prepare workers for the jobs of the future. Some online education providers won’t just train the growing work force but also government employees in the intricacies of everything from data analytics to cloud computing as the country goes increasingly digital.

http://fortuneindia.com/2017/may/going-back-to-school-online-1.10866

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June 12, 2017

MHCC-Portland State U team up to offer online business degree

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by Teresa Carson, Outlook

PSU and MHCC are supporting students to stay in school and finish the degree, by coordinating academic advising and other student services to help students seamlessly transition from community college to university. “This has all the advantages of taking classes online,” Wong said. Online learning is more convenient for some students who can skip the commute and parking hassles and more easily work class obligations around family and work commitments. But the online class requirements are similar to the on-campus requirements. “You still have to participate,” and turn in assigned work, Wong cautioned. The cost for the degree is about the same as taking the same classes in person.

http://www.pamplinmedia.com/go/42-news/360174-239826-mhcc-psu-team-up-to-offer-online-business-degree

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Apple releases programming course for college students

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

By Benny Evangelista, San Francisco Chronicle

Apple on Wednesday released a free college-level computer coding course designed to teach students how to create apps, a move that’s part of the company’s push to highlight its role in the U.S. economy. The one-year curriculum is called App Development With Swift. Swift is a programming language used for Apple apps and devices. Apple is offering the curriculum free on its iBooks Store, but has lined up six community college systems around the nation, including the San Mateo County Community College District, to use the course. CEO Tim Cook announced a $1 billion fund this month designed to create more U.S. manufacturing jobs. The announcement came amid criticism by President Trump of Silicon Valley’s reliance on overseas factories.

http://www.sfchronicle.com/business/article/Apple-releases-programming-course-for-college-11168372.php

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Researchers Have Created an AI That Is Naturally Curious

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Tom Ward, Futurism

Researchers at the University of California (UC), Berkeley, have produced an artificial intelligence (AI) that is naturally curious. They tested it successfully by having it play Super Mario and VizDoom (a rudimentary 3-D shooter), as the video linked below shows. Most current AIs are trained using ‘Reinforcement Learning’ — they are rewarded when they perform a task that helps them to reach a goal or complete a function. This is a useful and effective strategy for teaching AI to complete specific tasks — as shown by the AI who beat the AlphaGo world number one — but less useful when you want a machine to be autonomous and operate outside of direct commands. This is crucial step to integrating AI into the real world and having it solve real world problems because, as Agrawal says, “rewards in the real world are very sparse.”

https://futurism.com/researchers-have-created-an-ai-that-is-naturally-curious/

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Study finds students at most risk may be those least well served by online learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am
by  Nick Roll, Inside Higher Ed
The study found that the negative associations with online courses are concentrated in lower-performing students — the same ones who are often a key demographic for recruitment to online courses and online universities, since they might not fit in with the traditional college path. Still, the researchers weren’t calling for the end of online instruction. “On the contrary, online courses provide access to students who never would have the opportunity or inclination to take classes in person,” the report read. What needs to change, according to the report, is how these courses can provide not just access, but better learning outcomes — especially for those who need it the most.
https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/06/12/study-questions-effectiveness-online-education-risk-students
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June 11, 2017

When You’re Not Quite Sure If Your Teacher Is Human

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by TASNIM SHAMMA, NPR

A couple of years ago, Ashok Goel was overwhelmed by the number of questions his students were asking in his course on artificial intelligence. Goel teaches computer science at Georgia Tech, sometimes to large classes, where students can ask thousands of questions online in a discussion forum. With a limited number of teaching assistants, or TAs, many of those questions weren’t getting answered in time. So, Goel came up with a plan: make an artificial intelligence “teaching assistant” that could answer some of students’ frequently asked questions. In 2015 he built Jill Watson, his AI TA — named after one of the IBM founders, Thomas J. Watson. “Raising Jill is like raising a young child,” Goel says. “Initially when your child is very, very young, she just remembers all kinds of things she has heard from you, but she doesn’t understand it.” He says the newest version of Jill now understands concepts. Eventually he wants to export these artificial teachers to countries like India to try to boost literacy rates.

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2017/05/08/524550295/when-youre-not-quite-sure-if-your-teacher-is-human

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Helping Graduate Students Join an Online Learning Community

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

by Christina Yao, Brian Wilson, Crystal Garcia, Erica DeFrain and Andrew Cano; Educause Review

Online learners in graduate studies often face two new realities at the start of their academic careers: shifting identity into becoming graduate students, and developing online course competency. The Student Success Center — a strong orientation to online learning and graduate education — provides a foundation for establishing a community of online graduate program learners. Through that community of learners and with frequent interactions with instructors and staff, students can begin the process of becoming socialized into our department and their field of study. Finding collaborative ways to reduce their feelings of isolation and help online graduate students realize that they are part of a learning community that spans the university greatly improves the student experience and helps foster their success.

http://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/5/helping-graduate-students-join-an-online-learning-community

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The Rise of the Online Higher Education Leader

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

BY ADAM STONE , Converge

Not so long ago “online” meant “sidelines” in higher education. Professionals in the field often were treated as second-string players on a college’s administrative team. Things are changing. Online professionals in higher ed today increasingly say they have a seat at the table. They are equal partners in developing institutional strategy, and that new clout is giving them the freedom and the flexibility to experiment with new ideas. It’s “an exciting time to be a professional in our field,” said Khusro Kidwai, assistant dean of distance learning at Northwestern University School of Professional Studies.  Ray Schroeder saw this reflected in a title change two years ago. After nearly two decades with the University of Illinois, Springfield, he got new business cards that read “associate vice chancellor for online learning.” It was a reflection not just of his own seniority, but of the evolving place of online learning. “The role within the university has changed,” he said. “Online used to be held at arm’s length: It was for extension, it was for continuing education. Now it has moved into the mainstream.” In 2001, Debbie Cavalier helped launch Berklee Online, the distance learning arm of the Berklee College of Music in Boston. Today the online program touches 9,000 students a year, more than double the 4,000 annual enrollment of the traditional campus.

http://www.centerdigitaled.com/higher-ed/The-Rise-of-the-Online-Higher-Education-Leader.html

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June 10, 2017

Self-Directed Learning: Exploring the Digital Opportunity

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:07 am

by Mary Grush, Campus Technology

Virginia Commonwealth University associate professor of English W. Gardner Campbell considers why we should explore our digital opportunities for self-directed learning. “So at some point, self-directed learning, which is now an absolutely vital concept in higher learning, has to be considered as part of a larger conceptual framework. The larger framework incorporates the institution, the curriculum, and the faculty that you asked about. That larger framework should stress the role of expert-directed study and expert-facilitated encounters, especially in opportunities for self-directed learning.”

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/22/exploring-the-digital-opportunity-for-self-directed-learning.aspx

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“In future, education will be either blended or fully online” Interview with Amit Goyal, edX India

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

by Praggya Guptaa, Governance Now

MOOCs will not replace universities, but rather enhance the quality of education by incorporating blended learning. In future, education will be either blended or fully online. Pure face-to-face education will exist only in history books. In blended classrooms, the on-campus university course can leverage the power of MOOCs to free up classroom time for interactive collaboration and discussion, testing and problem-solving. This model creates better efficiencies in the classroom and can foster a better quality of education overall for the money.

http://www.governancenow.com/views/interview/in-future-education-will-be-either-blended-or-fully-online-amit-goyal-edx-digitisation

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Asynch Delivery and the LMS Still Dominate for Online Programs

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

While a recent research project examined enrollment patterns for online courses, a new survey is looking at broader questions related to online programs, this one based on responses from “chief online officers.” Produced by Quality Matters and Eduventures, the “Changing Landscape of Online Education (CHLOE)” offers a “baseline” examination of program development, quality measures and other structural issues. Most institutions rely on asynchronous delivery for their fully online programs. In fact, 95 percent of larger programs (those with 2,500 or more online program students) are “wholly asynchronous” while 1.5 percent are mainly or completely synchronous. About three-quarters (73 percent) of mid-sized programs (schools with between 500 and 2,499 online program students) and 62 percent of smaller programs are fully asynchronous.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/22/asynch-delivery-and-the-lms-still-dominate-for-online-programs.aspx

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June 9, 2017

Harvard HMX Offers Dose of Medical School Training in Online Format

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:08 am

by Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

Harvard University is issuing certificates for anybody who passes one or more of the same online courses that are also taken by incoming students prior to starting their Harvard Medical School curriculum and used by the institution’s faculty to “flip” their classrooms. The courses make up the university’s new “HMX” program, consisting of online instruction for medical education. The HMX classes each last 10 weeks and cover physiology, immunology, genetics and biochemistry. Rather than using “traditional lectures and PowerPoint slides,” these programs introduce real-world scenarios, animation, concept videos, notetaking guides, assessments, interactive components and videos that take participants into clinical settings. The price of each course is $800, or $1,000 when taken two at a time, or $1,800 when all four are taken simultaneously.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/05/harvard-hmx-offers-dose-of-medical-school-training-in-online-format.aspx?admgarea=news

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Google’s New AI Is Better at Creating AI Than the Company’s Engineers

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

by Tom Ward, Futurism

At its I/O ‘17 conference this week, Google shared details of its AutoML project, an artificial intelligence that can assist in the creation of other AIs. By automating some of the complicated process, AutoML could make machine learning more accessible to non-experts. The AutoML project focuses on deep learning, a technique that involves passing data through layers of neural networks. Creating these layers is complicated, so Google’s idea was to create AI that could do it for them.

https://futurism.com/googles-new-ai-is-better-at-creating-ai-than-the-companys-engineers/

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