Archive for the ‘Online Learning News’ Category

Free online courses from University of Oxford: OxfordX

Tuesday, December 6th, 2016

by edX

Oxford is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. It has been at the forefront of understanding the world – and shaping it – for centuries. Students at Oxford enjoy studying at an internationally renowned university with a centuries-old reputation for innovation and outstanding academic achievement. For the intensity, breadth, quality and impact of its research, Oxford has few peers in the world. Oxford’s outstanding academic researchers are today developing new ways of working together, across traditional disciplinary boundaries and across continents, to meet the key challenges of a modern, globalised world. The University of Oxford course linked below can be audited free or students can choose to receive a verified certificate for a small fee. Select the course below to learn more.From Poverty to Prosperity: Understanding Economic Development – Learn about the role of government and the key political, social, and economic processes that elevate any society from poverty to prosperity.

https://www.edx.org/school/oxfordx

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Strategy, Differentiation, and Online Learning

Tuesday, December 6th, 2016

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

The place to start an online program is around your school’s strengths. It is doubtful that every student who wants to learn what your school does best can move to where your school is located. Online learning solves this challenge. An online program does not need to be big to be sustainable. The beauty of online learning is that it can aggregate worldwide demand, and then be run without building one more physical classroom. 2017 will be the best year ever to start an new online program – as all the platforms, tools and technologies that you will need to teach at a distance are already on campus. You don’t need a new LMS (learning management system) for online courses because you already have one. The technology of online become both commoditized and ubiquitous.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/strategy-differentiation-and-online-learning

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A Faster, Cheaper Master’s Degree – From MIT To Boot

Tuesday, December 6th, 2016

by Kirk Carapezza, WGBH

Top colleges and universities around the world are partnering with edX – MIT and Harvard’s online learning platform – to offer MicroMasters. There’s User Interface Design from the University of Michigan, Entrepreneurship from the Indian Institute of Management in Bangalore, and Artificial Intelligence from Columbia University. Industry leaders – including General Electric, Walmart, IBM, and Volvo – who say they can’t find enough qualified candidates, are looking for these very specialized skills. To some degree, they’ve all recognized MicroMasters, saying they will consider applicants who master the work online. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts is also embracing the idea. “We need kind a revolution in higher education to make it more accessible, more affordable, and we need to have far higher success rates,” said Chris Gabrieli, chairman of the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education.

http://blogs.wgbh.org/on-campus/2016/11/28/accelerated-more-affordable-path-masters-degree/

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Virginia Foxx Named Chair of House Education Committee

Monday, December 5th, 2016

By Andrew Kreighbaum, Inside Higher Ed

North Carolina Republican Virginia Foxx, a vocal critic of the Obama administration’s higher education policies, will be the chairwoman of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce. Foxx, a former community college president, replaces Minnesota Republican John Kline, who is retiring at the end of the 114th Congress. In a postelection interview with Inside Higher Ed, Foxx said studying how those regulations could be repealed would be a top priority. And she said she would support scaling back the size of the Department of Education in the next Congress. Foxx’s committee will also play a key role in shaping education policy through the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act.

https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2016/12/05/foxx-named-chair-house-education-committee

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MIT task force releases preliminary “Future of Libraries” report

Monday, December 5th, 2016

by Peter Dizikes. MIT News Office

An MIT task force is releasing a preliminary report featuring a set of proposals aimed at steering MIT’s library system toward becoming an “open global platform” enabling the “discovery, use, and stewardship of information and knowledge” for future generations. The report, based on a year of work since the formation of the task force, contains general recommendations intended to develop “a global library for a global university,” while strengthening the library system’s relationship with the local academic community and public sphere. “For the MIT Libraries, the better world we seek is one in which there is abundant, equitable, meaningful access to knowledge and to the products of the full life cycle of research,” the report states. “Enduring global access to knowledge requires sustainable models for ensuring that past and present knowledge are available long into the future.”

https://news.mit.edu/2016/mit-task-force-releases-preliminary-future-libraries-report-1024

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Trump’s Choice for Education Secretary

Monday, December 5th, 2016

By Andrew Kreighbaum, Inside Higher Ed

President-elect Donald Trump’s pick of the Michigan school choice activist Betsy DeVos as his education secretary drew praise from many conservatives and criticism from liberal groups and teachers’ unions, who said the selection signaled intentions to privatize education. Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities is familiar with the DeVos family. He said DeVos has been interested in making sure low-income students have an opportunity for good education and positive outcomes.”My assumption is that those themes of interest in opportunity and accountability would be a major interest of hers in higher education,” McPherson said. House Ed Committee Chair Lamar Alexander said he looked forward to working with DeVos on a reauthorization of the Higher Education Act, which he called an opportunity to clear out a “jungle of red tape” in the sector.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/11/28/betsy-devos-trumps-choice-education-secretary-has-unclear-higher-ed-priorities

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Groups Issue Guidance on Making Digital Learning Accessible to All

Monday, December 5th, 2016

By Dian Schaffhauser, THE Journal

Two organizations have put together a 20-page guide to help steer state and district education leaders toward thinking about how to embed accessibility into their decision-making. The “Digital Accessibility Toolkit” was published by the Consortium on School Networking (CoSN) and the Center on Technology and Disability (CTD). While accessibility encompasses three specific groups of learners — those with disabilities, English language learners and students from under-resourced communities — the upshot of choosing accessible products is that all students actually benefit, the report stated. Universal design for learning (UDL), also known as “born accessible” or “inclusive design,” “seeks to level the playing field for all students” in three ways.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/11/16/groups-issue-guidance-on-making-digital-learning-accessible-to-all.aspx

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LinkedIn’s CEO says the U.S. cares too much about four-year college degrees

Sunday, December 4th, 2016

by HAKAN SEL, New Day Post

There’s a good reason Weiner has these views: LinkedIn may be more equipped than most to try to bridge this educational gap. That’s because the company bought online learning company Lynda.com back in the spring of 2015, and has spent the last 18 months trying to incorporate the site’s video library into LinkedIn’s other products. Here’s LinkedIn’s vision: The company knows what jobs are available, what skills are needed to qualify for those jobs, and then which online classes candidates will need to acquire those skills. It can, theoretically, provide the necessary training for each job opening on LinkedIn. The challenge, though, is in line with Weiner’s original point: The value of four-year degrees is often higher than simply acquiring one-off skills. So could LinkedIn offer certificates for online classes? Or even a LinkedIn degree?

http://newdaypost.com/linkedins-ceo-says-u-s-cares-much-four-year-college-degrees-0195480

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OER revolution in higher ed

Sunday, December 4th, 2016

by Matt Zalaznick, University Business

The University of Maryland’s open source textbook initiative, known as “MOST,” has guided faculty through more than 50 OER adoptions. The program helps instructors assemble resources to significantly keep down the cost of course materials. The University of Maryland’s open source textbook initiative, known as “MOST,” has guided faculty through more than 50 OER adoptions. The program helps instructors assemble resources to significantly keep down the cost of course materials. Open educational resources have grown over the last few years from one-off oddities in single courses to the basis of entire degree programs. Cutting out textbook costs for students tops the list of reasons administrators encourage faculty to develop and adopt these free—or very inexpensive—resources, also known as OER.

https://www.universitybusiness.com/article/oer-revolution-higher-ed

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The Future of Online Education: Will Our Courses Foreshadow Our Ends?

Sunday, December 4th, 2016

Anthony Picciano, Evolllution

American higher education is moving to a model where almost every course offered will have an online component. This is desirable during a time when enrollments will rise and perhaps get a boost if calls for debt-free public college education gain momentum. Because of state funding constraints, there will likely be fewer full-time, tenure-track faculty as a percentage of the total faculty as contract, untenured adjunct faculty, and tutors will take on more of the teaching load. Instructional approaches such as learning analytics, adaptive learning, competency-based instruction, interactive media, and mobile technology will mature in the 2020s. In the 2030s and beyond, it is likely that major new technology breakthroughs such as artificial intelligence, massive cloud computing, and brain machine interfaces will emerge that will change many aspects of human endeavor including education.

http://evolllution.com/programming/teaching-and-learning/the-future-of-online-education-will-our-courses-foreshadow-our-ends/

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Understanding Blended Learning Through Innovative Professional Development

Saturday, December 3rd, 2016

By Stepan Mekhitarian, EdSurge

There are two common practices used during professional development sessions that are limited in their applicability and effectiveness: First, teachers learn about multiple sites or tools they can use in their classrooms and are given time to experiment with them. Second, teachers discuss instructional practice for application in a traditional classroom, but are then expected to apply it in a blended setting. Neither of these practices melds effective pedagogical practice with educational technology to train teachers on how to offer individualized differentiation and constructivist learning opportunities for students. Another approach, however, can dramatically impact the effectiveness of blended learning professional development. Follow the steps below to apply a blended approach to professional development while focusing on effective instructional practice: Start with a pedagogical concept such as questioning or grouping that applies to all teachers.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-11-19-understanding-blended-learning-through-innovative-professional-development

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Professors in doubt over value of distance education

Saturday, December 3rd, 2016

by Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

A new survey from Gallup suggests that a predominant number of college and university faculty members, about 55%, are not confident in the outcomes of distance education when measured against traditional learning models. Of a respondent pool of more than 1,600 professors from all private, public and for-profit institutions, 40% said they have taught at least one online class, and 32% believed that learning was possible through digital and traditional classroom settings at any institution. More than 60% of professors with no online teaching experience believe that positive outcomes are possible in either academic setting.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/professors-in-doubt-over-value-of-distance-education/431074/

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Why I’m Intrigued by Pearson’s HoloLens Initiative

Saturday, December 3rd, 2016

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

Let’s take a step here. First, most of us have not gotten our heads around augmented reality. We tend to conflate VR (virtual reality) and AR (augmented reality). The biggest news in VR over the past few years has been the $2 billion purchase of the VR company Oculus by Facebook in 2014, and the release of the Oculus Rift this year. AR is different from VR in that the user is not fully immersed in the virtual world, but rather interact with a combination of holographic images (and sound) with the physical environment. Microsoft calls this “mixed reality” – and for an idea of what wearing a HoloLens is like you should check out this video on their HoloLens site.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/why-im-intrigued-pearsons-hololens-initiative

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A ‘Moon Shot’ for Libraries

Friday, December 2nd, 2016

By Carl Straumsheim, Inside Higher Ed

Chris Bourg, director of libraries at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, describes the MIT report as a “moon shot” for libraries. The wide-ranging report covers digitization, open access, redesign of physical spaces and more, but it ultimately recommends libraries focus on four “pillars”: community and relationships, discovery and use, stewardship and sustainability, and research and development. Bourg said, “Providing access to credible information and the tools to assess, use, understand and exploit it is what libraries, librarians and archivists have always done. It’s more important than ever now.” MIT, with its focus on science, technology, engineering and math, is in a different position to grapple with those issues compared to universities with traditional strengths (and extensive library collections) in the humanities and social sciences, other library directors and researchers said.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/11/23/massachusetts-institute-technology-invites-academe-collaborate-future-libraries

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What degrees can you earn online?

Friday, December 2nd, 2016

by “Ask NAIJ”

The education through the Internet is more than real. Simply choose a training course, pay for it, and get the access to the database on the website of one or another educational institution. Then it all depends on your desire to achieve something great. Many grown-up people want to continue learning during all their life. However, they can’t attend college for obvious reasons. The need to work and earn money doesn’t leave them any time for a full time studying. The strict schedule and stable requirements are not an option, as well. Here come the online educational programs that suit all the needs of working people because they offer flexible schedules and study plans. Completing online programs allows you to combine work and learning things you’ve always wanted to learn. If you are an ambitious person and desire to achieve both academic and professional goals, then online education is certainly for you.

https://ask.naij.com/education/what-degrees-can-you-earn-online-i28473.html

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Changing the Landscape of Higher Education

Friday, December 2nd, 2016

by David M. Kirby, Huffington Post

Education is ever-changing, especially in a world with rapid technology advancement. As new technologies and methods become available, the way we teach and are taught must by necessity change as well. Core principles and basics of education remains, yet the method by which these are accomplished must by necessity adapt to meet the needs of students and the workforce. Education continues to evolve at a rapid pace because how we learn has importance. There’s never been only a single way to learn, and the educational system is reflecting that. MOOCs and other online courses are both examples of adapting education to suit the needs of the evolving modern student. Technology plays an important role in this, especially as education becomes more accessible to students regardless of their location or background.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-m-kirby/changing-the-landscape-of_b_13127826.html

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A Mobile Personal Assistant Tuned to Student Needs

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

By Meg Lloyd, Campus Technology

In an effort to help freshmen manage the college transition, the University of San Diego created a smart personal assistant app designed to help students prioritize and track their tasks. To help students cope, Senior Director of Enterprise Technologies Avi Badwal (project lead) and Vice Provost and CIO Chris Wessells worked with campus developers to create the Insight Mobile App: a smart personal assistant app that allows students to prioritize and track their tasks. The app is designed to be specifically relevant to USD and its systems, according to Wessells: “Generic personal assistants aren’t very effective for our students, because they are not tied in with our Student Information System or our Constituent Relationship Management System,” he said. “To do something more powerful, we connect Insight with those two systems.”

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/11/08/a-mobile-personal-assistant-tuned-to-student-needs.aspx

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Microsoft, Code.org Use Minecraft to Teach Coding

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

By David Nagel, THE Journal

Microsoft and Code.org have come together to debut Minecraft Designer, a free tutorial for students aged 6 and up that uses the Minecraft environment to teach coding. Minecraft Designer is a free, hour-long, interactive online tutorial (with offline capabilities for those who want to work when they don’t have access to the Internet) that teaches basic coding in Minecraft and, perhaps more importantly, is designed to inspire interest in computer science, particularly among groups that might not traditionally pursue CS.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/11/15/microsoft-code.org-use-minecraft-to-teach-coding.aspx

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Online law degrees flourish under tight supervision

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

by: Ian Wylie, Financial Times

The latest law school to say it will venture a hybrid JD programme is Syracuse University College of Law. From 2018, pending approval from the American Bar Association, students will take classes online then come to campus for weeklong residential sessions. The school, which hopes the programme will help reverse its enrolment decline, is delivering the course with edtech company 2U. The school’s intake for 2016 is up 14 per cent on last year, but — in line with the national trend — still almost a fifth lower than a decade ago. The cost of tuition will be the same as the standard JD programme at Syracuse but the “opportunity cost” of attending will be “significantly lower”, says Nina Kohn, associate dean for research. “Students can continue working while completing their degree and will not have to move their families or leave their existing support systems,” she says. Syracuse will be only the second law school accredited by the ABA to offer such a hybrid JD programme; Mitchell Hamline School of Law launched the first last year. In 1998, non-ABA-accredited Concord Law School rolled out the first online JD programme, and other non-ABA accredited schools soon followed.

https://www.ft.com/content/41458ab4-9ab7-11e6-8f9b-70e3cabccfae

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The IT Issues Ahead

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

By Rhea Kelly, Campus Technology

Educause recently revealed its Top 10 IT Issues for 2017, prioritizing information security for the second year in a row and emphasizing data, infrastructure and IT leadership. What issues will most impact your institution? Each year at the Educause annual conference, I make sure to catch the preview of the coming year’s Top 10 IT Issues. It’s always a packed room (it’s a good idea to arrive early to find a seat), full of attendees with cameras ready to capture the presentation slides as they appear on the projection screen. After all, the Top 10 IT Issues are like a bellwether for the year ahead, pointing to key trends and challenges that every higher ed IT leader should be thinking about.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/11/10/the-it-issues-ahead.aspx

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Carnegie Mellon Tool Displays Visualization of Malware Attack Patterns

Wednesday, November 30th, 2016

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

A security research project at Carnegie Mellon University could simplify the process of identifying how malware is being distributed through visualization. Researchers at the institution’s CyLab Security and Privacy Institute have created a tool that lets a network or security administrator display network traffic in a way that helps identify the changes and patterns The results could eventually help organizations stop the kind of distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack that brought down major websites in late October.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/11/14/carnegie-mellon-tool-displays-visualization-of-malware-attack-patterns.aspx

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