Archive for the ‘Online Learning News’ Category

TwitterChat: Balancing the Urgency of Revenue Performance with Mission and Quality Online – May 27

Wednesday, May 27th, 2015

by Ray Schroeder, Josh Kim (Dartmouth / Inside Higher Ed), Katie Blot (Blackboard), Debbie Cavalier (Berklee)

Challenged by complex and shifting funding models, higher education faces a growing urgency to balance mission and product mix to keep things afloat as enrollments and state funding decline. Adding to this complexity is the growing tension in the marketplace in which the value/currency of traditional degrees are challenged by micro-credentials and the emergence of CBE. How can institutions address these crises? Join UPCEA for this timely TweetChat by using the hashtag #HigherEdAhead on social media as online education leaders share experiences and resources and respond to your questions. A live question and answer session will occur on May 27th from 2-3PM EST.

http://upcea.edu/tweetchat

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Discover 4 Unusual Online Bachelor’s Degrees

Wednesday, May 27th, 2015

by Ian Quillan, US News

Many people know a college student or a working professional pursuing an online degree in business, health care, information technology or education. “People are stepping away from the thought of, ‘You can’t learn that online,’” says Cali Morrison, communications manager at WCET, an organization that advocates for effective technology use in higher education. And now in 2015, it’s possible to get an online bachelor’s degree in fire and emergency services administration, aviation, integrative health or even horticulture.

http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/articles/2015/05/18/discover-4-unusual-online-bachelors-degrees

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Cal Lt. Gov. cites insufficient outreach to faculty in push for online education

Wednesday, May 27th, 2015

by David Siders, Sacramento Bee

Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom said Monday that he and other proponents of online education, including Gov. Jerry Brown, failed to sufficiently engage faculty members in their longstanding push to expand online course offerings at California’s colleges and universities. Brown has pressed the University of California and California State University systems to expand online offerings for more than two years, hoping to expand the system’s reach and to reduce costs. But his efforts remain largely unfulfilled.

http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article21349020.html

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UK Digital Course Provider Claims Biggest Student Uptake

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

by Shannon Greenhalgh, MISCO

Classroom overcrowding is not an issue for UK online learning platform FutureLearn. The digital course provider is claiming the biggest online university course ever. The service has reported that 370,000 students have enrolled for its English language British Council course – showing the scale of online learning, says the BBC. The Understanding IELTS (International English Language Testing System): Techniques for English Language Tests course, which prepares students for a recognised English language proficiency test, has overtaken in numbers a US social psychology course from the Connecticut-based Wesleyan University which had 260,000 students.

http://www.misco.co.uk/blog/news/02964/learning-online-digital-course-provider-claims-biggest-student-uptake

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When Your Online Course Is Put Up for Adoption

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

by Steve Kolowich, Chronicle of Higher Ed

For many institutions, online education has been an opportunity not only to increase the number of enrolled students, but also to focus on designing courses that are compelling no matter who is leading them. “You’re seeing more and more of instructors rotating in and out of courses once they’re developed, because obviously the time to develop a course is a lot,” says John Haubrick, manager of instructional design at Pennsylvania State University’s online arm.

http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/when-your-online-course-is-put-up-for-adoption/56723

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A Semi-Automated System for Recognizing Prior Knowledge

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

by Joaquim Moré, et al; iJET

Adaptive e-learning systems are able to automatically generate personalized learning paths from the students’ profile. Generally, the student profile is updated with information about knowledge the student has acquired, courses the student has passed and previous work experience. Unfortunately, dealing with courses that students passed in other learning environments is very difficult, error prone and requires a lot of manual intervention. In addition, the recognition of external courses is a process that all institutions, on-site and online learning organization, must perform during the access of new students, since it can be greatly useful not only for personalization but also for recognizing the courses the students attended. In this paper, we propose an intelligent system that analyzes the academic record of students in textual format to identify what subjects the students studied in the past and therefore are potentially recognizable. In addition, the proposed system is able to enrich the information the institution has about the students’ background, facilitating the identification of personalized learning paths.

http://online-journals.org/index.php/i-jet/article/view/4610

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TwitterChat: Balancing the Urgency of Revenue Performance with Mission and Quality Online – May 27

Monday, May 25th, 2015

by Ray Schroeder, Josh Kim (Dartmouth / Inside Higher Ed), Katie Blot (Blackboard), Debbie Cavalier (Berklee)

Challenged by complex and shifting funding models, higher education faces a growing urgency to balance mission and product mix to keep things afloat as enrollments and state funding decline. Adding to this complexity is the growing tension in the marketplace in which the value/currency of traditional degrees are challenged by micro-credentials and the emergence of CBE. How can institutions address these crises? Join UPCEA for this timely TweetChat by using the hashtag #HigherEdAhead on social media as online education leaders share experiences and resources and respond to your questions. A live question and answer session will occur on May 27th from 2-3PM EST.

http://upcea.edu/tweetchat

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Effects of Applying the Site Map Principle in an Online Learning Environment in Higher Education

Monday, May 25th, 2015

by Laura Porta Simó, et al; iJET

Web interfaces play a very important role in teaching-learning processes in virtual environments, since this is how students carry out their activity. This paper describes a web interface for online learning based on a graphic map that orients learners, tries to reduce cognitive overload, gives access to learning resources and personalizes learning. The interface was designed to guide the learning process in accordance with Shapiro’s “site map principle”. The objective of this article is to analyze the impact of such web interface on students’ satisfaction with the learning process and on their academic performance. We conducted experimental research. The experiment tested the goodness of the interface among students enrolled in a Multimedia Degree in an open university. We used the T-Test, the Chi-square Test and the Kendall correlation Test. The results showed that the interface had a positive impact on students’ satisfaction and performance. It also encouraged students to take a more proactive role in their learning activity than with the “normal” interface. These results are in keeping with the features the site map principle has shown in face-to-face environments.

http://online-journals.org/index.php/i-jet/article/view/4620

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Get Back to Work – Reducing Procrastination in Online Classes

Monday, May 25th, 2015

by Carl Straumsheim, Tomorrow’s Professor

The key to making online students focus on their course work may be making procrastination as unenjoyable as possible, according to a study out of Cornell University. It’s a familiar problem to anyone with a deadline and a computer: the assignment is open on the screen, half-finished, but is quickly lost in a stack of web browser tabs. Upon rediscovery (with an accompanying pang of guilt), the procrastinator resolves to buckle down and type out the last few paragraphs — right after clearing the notification that just popped up and checking just one more website. Richard W. Patterson, a Ph.D. student in policy analysis and management at Cornell, wanted to see if software could reduce procrastination and, as a result, improve students’ grades.

http://cgi.stanford.edu/~dept-ctl/cgi-bin/tomprof/enewsletter.php?msgno=1413

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NM online classes will go out of state

Sunday, May 24th, 2015

By Mike Bush, ABQ Journal

The ability of New Mexico’s public and private colleges and universities to offer online programs beyond the state borders just increased considerably and includes target states from coast to coast. In addition, New Mexico students who take distance education courses from institutions in those other states can now rest assured that the programs meet high, uniform standards. The state Higher Education Department announced this week that the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education – of which New Mexico is one of 16 members – unanimously approved New Mexico for membership in the State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement.

http://www.abqjournal.com/586393/news/nm-online-classes-will-go-out-of-state.html

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Archaeology professor designs first online companion course for field work in Kenya

Sunday, May 24th, 2015

by Ryan Lasker, GW Hatchet

Before GW’s archaeology students visit Kenya, they’re going to have to see it on their computer screens. A field archaeology course run by David Braun, an associate professor of archaeology, now features a four-week-long online course that prepares students to study early human origins for six weeks over the summer at the Koobi Fora Field School in northern Kenya’s Sibiloi National Park. The class marks the University’s first online companion course for a course held abroad. With previous classes, Braun had previously typed up a 150-page manual with information on geology, ecology and evolution for students to read before heading off to Kenya. But that set the students back in learning once they got to Kenya because, “we knew that they didn’t get to read [the document],” he said.

http://www.gwhatchet.com/2015/05/18/archeology-professor-designs-first-online-companion-course-for-field-work-in-kenya/

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Online classes, convenience does not mean easier set up

Sunday, May 24th, 2015
By Rachel Fradette, State News

My fellow procrastinators, you cannot procrastinate in these classes and expect to pass with flying colors. Online classes require participation throughout the entire class. If you wait to work on anything, you will get far behind and you can kiss that 4.0 goodbye. So if you are constantly battling your own laziness, I would recommend you either not take the class or you use it as a way to fix your problem. After each of my online classes, I had become a much more diligent student–they forced me to actively participate. Go for those online classes, but be cautious, you will have to work harder than usual.

http://statenews.com/article/2015/05/online-summer-classes-opinion

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Stigma over online courses has gone away

Saturday, May 23rd, 2015

by Patrick Murphy, Ft Wayne Journal Gazette

Online degrees are more common and accepted part of the educational landscape, according to career counselors and people like Jennifer Schramm, manager for workforce trends and forecasting with the Society for Human Resource Management. “More and more employers and job applicants are realizing the opportunities available online,” Schramm said. “And company executives and human resource professionals feel more comfortable considering and hiring individuals who obtained these types of degrees later in life.”

http://www.journalgazette.net/business/Stigma-over-online-courses-has-gone-away-6634536

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4 Steps to Smart Online Learning at Your Agency

Saturday, May 23rd, 2015

by Paul Terry, ATD

Every agency has requirements for training and professional development. From keeping Baby Boomers at the top of their game to getting a new generation of federal employees up to speed, talent development leaders need to align training with the mission and objectives of their agencies. However, most government agencies are at a crossroads. Learning and development (L&D) remains a critical need, but budgets continue to tighten. Consequently, a growing number of agencies are turning to a cost-effective, online learning environment to ensure training mandates are met while saving budget dollars. Indeed, online learning is not only economical, but when used as part of a blended solution, it is proving to be more effective than traditional training.

https://www.td.org/Publications/Blogs/GovLearning-Blog/2015/05/4-Steps-to-Smart-Online-Learning-at-Your-Agency

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Community of practice helps faculty and staff step into role of online learner

Saturday, May 23rd, 2015
by Lika Balenovich, University of Wisconsin
Lisa Hebgen and other TeachOnline@UW participants shared their lessons learned during mini-presentations after the Fall 2014 workshop. This past year, more than 20 faculty and instructional staff received another chance at being a student — a role reversal that allowed each of them to explore the opportunities and challenges facing today’s online learners and instructors. As participants in UW-Madison’s inaugural TeachOnline@UW learning community, participants from eight schools and colleges came together to learn and share strategies for designing and teaching quality online courses. Over 12 months, they met and completed online coursework to learn how to better design and manage courses with specific learning goals, and to explore the use of new tools to help their teaching and their students.
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Purdue hires actors to deliver online course content

Friday, May 22nd, 2015

By Tara García Mathewson, Education Dive

Purdue has seen success with its online courses by hiring actors who can be more engaging to watch than industry professionals. Campus Technology reports that the university cut the standard 20- to 40-minute lecture series by subject-matter experts in favor of 7-minute videos from actors contracted by a studio in Dallas. The shorter videos allow specific modules to be replaced easily to update courses, and, while the actor fees are relatively hefty, in some cases they’re cheaper than experts and their work gets better outcomes, according to the article.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/purdue-hires-actors-to-deliver-online-course-content/397777/

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Feds say Miami University failed to accommodate disabled students

Friday, May 22nd, 2015
by Collin Binkley, The Columbus Dispatch
Miami University has failed to accommodate students with disabilities and provide them the technology they need to learn, the U.S. Department of Justice reports. The department joined an existing lawsuit filed against Miami by a blind student who said the school promised to accommodate her but failed to deliver.  A statement from the department said education is “said to be the great equalizer of American society.” “However, students with disabilities continue to encounter an impenetrable glass ceiling of opportunity when schools fail to comply with the ADA,” Vanita Gupta principal deputy assistant attorney general of the department’s Civil Rights Division, said in the statement.  The department’s legal complaint demands that Miami provide the right accommodations to students with disabilities, and to pay damages to those harmed by its practices.
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Learning online offers many educational, financial benefits

Friday, May 22nd, 2015

By Jan Burns, Houston Chronicle

Students are finding out that online programs can be an affordable education path. Though not all online programs have less expensive tuition than traditional schools, the associated costs can be lower. “The financial benefits of enrolling in online programs at universities is that students do not have to pay commuting expenses, may not need additional child care, and most likely will be able to continue in their current employment while in school as they can manage their own schedule and do their coursework around their families and work obligations,” said Vickie S. Cook, Ph.D., director, Center for Online Learning, research and service/research associate professor, University of Illinois at Springfield.

http://www.chron.com/jobs/article/Learning-online-offers-many-educational-6264367.php

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Does financial literacy ed need a “flipped” boost?

Thursday, May 21st, 2015

by eCampus News

New course intends to give program facilitators an in-depth understanding of financial literacy. iGrad and the University of Illinois (UI) have launched a financial literacy instructor certification program, aimed at boosting instructor confidence in the subject. The online course will be led by Scott Johnson, Program Coordinator of the Illinois Online Network (ION), a faculty development program at the University of Illinois that focuses on online and technology-enhanced teaching and learning. The course will employ the classroom curriculum “Your Financial Mastery” from iGrad and “Pay Your Family First.” The 2015 “Education Program of the Year” was written by best-selling author Sharon Lechter and Certified Personal and Family Finance Educator Angela Totman.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/igrad-financial-literacy-243/

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5 core functions of the LMS of the future

Thursday, May 21st, 2015

By Meris Stansbury, eCampus News

According to over 70 education IT specialists, current LMS functionality is great for administrative tasks, but doesn’t provide support for the new learning approaches in today’s schools. The next generation digital learning environment (NGDLE), says a new EDUCAUSE report, will need a “Lego” approach, where components are built that allow individuals and institutions the opportunity to construct learning environments tailored to their requirement and goals.“What is clear is that the LMS has been highly successful in enabling the administration of learning, but less so in enabling the learning itself,” wrote the report’s authors. “The challenge is to build on the value of an LMS as an administrative tool by retaining what works, but not be bound to an outgoing model of teaching and learning. [This] NGDLE is what should come after the LMS era.”

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/05/13/post-lms-era-437/

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Education’s Moment of Truth

Thursday, May 21st, 2015

By Frederick Singer, Inside Higher Ed

The use of big data and predictive analytics in higher education is nascent. So-called disrupters often claim that the lecture hasn’t changed in 150 years, and that only online learning can drive transformative, game-changing outcomes for students. Of course, these claims ring hollow among today’s tech-savvy professors. Since my transition into higher education, I have been struck by the parallel journey retailers and educators face. Both have been proclaimed obsolete at various points, but the reality is that the lecture, like the retail experience, has and will continue to evolve to meet the new demands of 21st-century users.

https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2015/05/14/professors-should-seize-chance-use-data-improve-learning-essay

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