Archive for the ‘Online Learning News’ Category

Keep gender in mind for course evaluations

Saturday, April 18th, 2015

by the Daily Tarheel (letter to editor)

Recent research suggests that students rate female professors more harshly than male professors. When a female professor of an online course pretends she is male, her evaluations are significantly higher than when students know she is a female, and evaluations of female professors are more likely to focus on aspects of personality or appearance rather than intellect or skill in the classroom. Gender bias in course evaluations can be reduced by focusing comments on feedback that is useful for improving instruction. Ideally, student comments will help us improve our instructional techniques and thus improve the learning experience of future Carolina students. Comments that are vague, belittling, personal or based on gender expectations do not help us make our courses better.

http://www.dailytarheel.com/article/2015/04/letter-keep-gender-in-mind-for-course-evaluations

Share on Facebook

Fee payments lift MOOC completion rates

Saturday, April 18th, 2015

by Tim Dodd, Financial Review

Students in massive open online courses (MOOC) who pay a modest amount for a “verified certificate” are just as likely finish their course as regular university students, according to a new large-scale study of online education. The study, from Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) which jointly founded the leading MOOC provider edX, found those students who paid the usually less-than $US100 ($130) fee for a certificate, had a 59 per cent course completion rate, the same as the overall graduation rate for students enrolling in bachelor’s degrees in the United States.

http://www.afr.com/news/policy/education/fee-payments-lift-mooc-completion-rates-20150412-1mhw76

Share on Facebook

UCLA Library to expand program promoting free, online course material

Saturday, April 18th, 2015

BY DANIEL AHN, Daily Bruin

UCLA, following the lead of many universities, is expanding an initiative to promote free, online course materials for students amid rising textbook costs. The Affordable Course Materials Initiative, a UCLA Library-led project which launched in 2013 as a pilot program, will become an official program fall 2015. The program, which UCLA recently decided to continue, seeks to encourage faculty members to compile online resources in a textbook-like form so they can be freely accessed by professors and students. The library will send out applications for the program this week, and instructors will be able to apply for a grant of up to $2,500 to help find resources and adjust syllabi and assignments. Since 2013, the UCLA Library has awarded $27,500 to 23 instructors. The library estimates that students enrolled in awarded courses saved more than $160,000 collectively since the program began.

http://dailybruin.com/2015/04/13/ucla-library-to-expand-program-promoting-free-online-course-material/

Share on Facebook

The ‘University Of Everywhere’ Isn’t For Everyone: The Future Of Learning Will Be A Big Tent

Friday, April 17th, 2015

by Andrew Kelly, Forbes

The point is: all of these ideas are part of the future of learning. Because the set of prospective students is large and diverse, that future must be a “big tent” containing a variety of new ideas, not just online learning. Some of the tools (i.e., MOOCs) will be low-touch, low-cost affairs with little interpersonal contact. Others will feature short, intense doses of direct instruction and mentorship and cost significant amounts of money. In short, entrepreneurs will produce different products because learners have different preferences. While The End of College implicitly acknowledges this by talking about more than just MOOCs, other models always seem to take a back seat to the open online courses that Carey expects to dominate in the future.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/akelly/2015/04/08/the-university-of-everywhere-isnt-for-everyone-the-future-of-learning-will-be-a-big-tent/

Share on Facebook

The Benefits of Adaptive Learning Technology

Friday, April 17th, 2015

By Kristen Hicks, Edudemic

Adaptive learning has long been a part of education. The basic concept is simple: Coursework should be adapted to meet the individual needs of each student. Every teacher has experience modifying curriculum in some way to help students access information. Nowadays technology can help make the adaptations easier and more streamlined. Many of the benefits that adaptive technology offers in online courses also apply to traditional classrooms. However, the nature of online learning means that some of the challenges adaptive learning helps to address are especially relevant to online students. When teachers and students don’t interact with each other regularly in person, as often happens with online courses, having a tool that helps pick up the slack becomes that much more important.

http://www.edudemic.com/how-adaptive-learning-technology-is-being-used-in-online-courses/

Share on Facebook

Coming to a business school near you: disruption

Friday, April 17th, 2015

by Margaret Andrews, University World News

Over the past few years it seems you can’t read about higher education without thinking about how ripe it is for disruption. Rising costs, employer dissatisfaction with graduate skills, technology advances and new entrants are making the case for the need for new ways of thinking about and delivering education. Based on some recent developments, business schools may be the first to feel the heat. Clay Christensen, who popularised the idea of disruption, has written and spoken quite a bit about disruption in higher education in general, and the management education market in particular. So how is this beginning to play out in the management education sphere? There are many new initiatives afoot.

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20150406140223800

Share on Facebook

UVa’s Curry School of Education Will Offer 3 Degrees Completely Online

Thursday, April 16th, 2015

by Molly Greenberg, DCInno

The University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education will offer its first online degrees this fall. They include two master of education degrees in reading education and curriculum and education, and an education specialist degree in reading education. Faculty members worked alongside a team of instructional designers to determine the map out how best to use technology to support the curriculum. Classes are limited to just 20 to 25 students – the same admittance size as would be found in any of UVa’s Curry School classrooms. “The Curry School’s expansion of online offerings reflects this core value of embracing diverse learner populations and needs,” said Stephanie Moore, assistant professor and online learning coordinator at the Curry School, to UVA Today. “It allows us to serve eligible students who may not be able to move for a degree, but who bring valuable experience and perspective into the learning environment.”

http://dcinno.streetwise.co/2015/04/07/online-learning-uvas-curry-school-of-education-offers-3-degrees/

Share on Facebook

New Research Shows Free Online Courses Didn’t Grow As Expected

Thursday, April 16th, 2015

by ANYA KAMENETZ, NPR

Andrew Ho, a lead author of the paper at Harvard, thinks the value of certificates will increase, “but ultimately be limited by the quality of assessments and assessment security, both areas where greater investment is necessary.” Translation: Proving that you and no one else completed that physics problem set costs money. The simplest answer to “What happens now?” is this: Despite lingering doubts about the power and profitability of MOOCs, companies and universities are still spending significant resources to create and support them for millions of people, in nearly every country, for free. It’s an investment, for now, on faith.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/ed/2015/04/11/397295495/the-future-of-free-online-courses-new-research-from-mit-and-harvard

Share on Facebook

Tech-savvy seek dating help in online courses

Thursday, April 16th, 2015

By Greta Kaul, Houston Chronicle

The 21st century version of the self-help book is an online course on how to get a date. And this is no tutorial on using Match.com but rather an online course — complete with a quiz and practice activities — in how to read body language and make good conversation. Udemy, an online course platform that enlists “everyday experts” to teach classes, helps people learn everything from programming to photography to marketing — and also how to approach the person you’re eyeing across the coffee shop. Udemy has seen its personal development offerings take off since about 2011, a year after it started, said Shannon Hughes, the company’s senior director of marketing. Though they’re a smaller share of the site’s course catalog, personal development classes are growing fast, and 77 of them — with nearly 52,000 students — cover dating and relationships.

http://www.chron.com/business/article/Tech-savvy-seek-dating-help-in-online-courses-6192588.php

Share on Facebook

Accreditation for alternative credentialing gaining traction

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015

By Tara García Mathewson, Education Dive

Multiple ideas to accredit alternative credentialing pathways are gaining traction in a push to expand opportunities for nontraditional, post-secondary learning.  Massive open online courses, coding bootcamps, and other programs offering “microcredentials” can’t currently accept federal financial aid because they’re not accredited, which ends up limiting access to low-income prospective students, Insider Higher Ed reports. Alternative pathways to accreditation include partnerships with accredited universities, the creation of new — state or federal — accreditation agencies, and authorization for existing accreditation agencies to do the job.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/accreditation-for-alternative-credentialing-gaining-traction/385338/

Share on Facebook

Higher Ed/Library Views Impact Final Net Neutrality Order

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015

by Jarret Cummings, EDUCAUSE

The FCC recently posted the full text of the network neutrality order it passed in late February. (Please see “FCC Votes to Restore Strong Net Neutrality Protections.”) An outline released after the vote highlighted the “no blocking, no throttling, no paid prioritization” rules that the order would impose. While those align with the views of the higher education/libraries coalition in which EDUCAUSE serves as a core member, the coalition looked forward to seeing if the order would address the other concerns it raised. And the order does.

http://www.educause.edu/blogs/jcummings/higher-edlibrary-views-impact-final-net-neutrality-order

Share on Facebook

7 THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT UNIVERSAL DESIGN FOR LEARNING

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015
by Janet Gronneberg (CAST, Inc.), Sam Johnston (CAST, Inc.), EDUCAUSE
Universal Design for Learning is a framework for the design of materials and instructional methods that are usable by a wide range of students. One aim of UDL is to provide full access to students with special needs, but it offers significant affordances for all students, allowing them to benefit from learning presented through multiple sensory avenues and a variety of conceptual frameworks. Early research about the influence of UDL is positive, showing that it improves engagement and performance among all students.
Share on Facebook

Arizona State U Teams with Private Partners on Adaptive Learning

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

By Leila Meyer, Campus Technology

Arizona State University (ASU) has partnered with Cengage Learning and Knewton to develop new active learning systems for introductory courses. The goal of the partnership is to provide ASU students with personalized learning in introductory college courses and to let instructors spend more time supporting students and less time lecturing and managing the class. ASU’s new “Active Adaptive” courses will use Knewton’s adaptive learning platform within Cengage Learning’s MindTap digital learning solution in an effort to achieve this goal. Together, ASU, Cengage Learning and Knewton will develop a series of Active Adaptive general education courses.

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/04/08/arizona-state-u-teams-with-private-partners-on-adaptive-learning.aspx

Share on Facebook

More Business Schools Launch Online MBA Degrees To Hone Digital Edge

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

by Seb Murray, Business Because

Top business schools have been investing heavily in digital learning environments, as the full-time MBA loses some of its lustre to shorter, online courses. The University of Southern California Marshall School of Business will offer an online MBA program focused on analytics, social media, virtual teams and entrepreneurial thinking – the latest top institution to tap into learning tech. Business schools have been investing heavily in digital learning environments, as the full-time MBA loses some of its lustre to shorter, online courses. USC Marshall’s online coursework will be conducted primarily in an asynchronous – flexible – format, with weekly, scheduled seminars conducted by faculty via webcam, and a one-week event on campus. The new program will incorporate live action cases, interactive exercises and virtual teamwork. John Matsusaka, USC Marshall online MBA academic director, said: “Online technologies continue to rapidly reshape our world.”

http://www.businessbecause.com/news/mba-distance-learning/3207/more-business-schools-launch-online-mbas

Share on Facebook

LinkedIn will acquire lynda.com in $1.5B deal

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

By Roger Riddell, Education Dive

LinkedIn announced Thursday its plans to acquire lynda.com in a $1.5 billion cash-and-stock deal. Lynda.com’s courses are focused on adults wishing to improve business, technology, and creative skills, and Reuters reports that the acquisition will allow LinkedIn to show what skills are needed for particular jobs listed on its social network. The deal, according to Reuters, is expected to give LinkedIn’s lucrative hiring business an additional boost.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/linkedin-will-acquire-lyndacom-in-15b-deal/384898/

Share on Facebook

Harvard’s Peter Bol, a leader in online learning, outlines the challenges and prospects ahead

Monday, April 13th, 2015

By Jennifer Doody, Harvard Gazette

I bring together three different areas. First is the Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching, which has been concerned with pedagogy directed at advances in teaching and learning across the University. Next is HarvardX, founded two years ago to create open online learning content made accessible to the world through platforms like edX, for which Harvard and MIT made the initial investment. Then there’s a group devoted to research on teaching and learning in the online learning space, and I think we’ll see an increase in attention to residential teaching and learning as well. One of my goals is to ensure that what we do with HarvardX is also circulated through campus; that what we do in research not only improves the quality of our learning online, but also that the research on online learning and teaching can benefit the residential community here at Harvard, and build pedagogy across the schools.

http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2015/04/a-new-office-a-global-audience/

Share on Facebook

University of Illinois increases free online college course development

Monday, April 13th, 2015

By Maggie Sullivan, Daily Illini

In an effort to compensate professors who spend time creating MOOCs, the University of Illinois Academic Senate is set to discuss a resolution on providing funding for professors who develop MOOCs. The University was the first land-grant university to partner with Coursera, one of the largest MOOC providers, Tucker said. “There is a brand recognition piece to this,” said Deanna Raineri, Associate Provost of Education Innovation. “We felt that this was a good opportunity for the University of Illinois to show the world that we have very high quality education here.” Students cannot earn credit toward their degree through most Moocs. However, Raineri believes in the future, MOOCs will be offered for college credit.

http://www.dailyillini.com/news/article_370ef4b0-dd7e-11e4-9fa8-ffa807ac7a37.html

Share on Facebook

ACCA Debuts Online Learning Venture

Monday, April 13th, 2015

BY MICHAEL COHN, Accounting Today

The Association of Chartered Certified Accountants has introduced ACCA-X, a set of online learning courses for accountants and financial professionals. The courses will be delivered on edX, an online learning platform founded by MIT and Harvard. ACCA-X’s open access courses will feature content developed by Epigeum, a spin-out from Imperial College London.

• Introductory Financial and Management Accounting Course, leading to ACCA’s Introductory Certificate in Financial and Management Accounting; and,

• Intermediate Financial and Management Accounting Course, leading to ACCA’s Intermediate Certificate in Financial and Management Accounting.

http://www.accountingtoday.com/news/audit-accounting/acca-debuts-online-learning-venture-74211-1.html

Share on Facebook

3,118 applicants accepted as freshmen by University of Florida, Gainesville required to take first year online

Sunday, April 12th, 2015

By SOPHIE JANE EVANS, Daily Mail

More than 3,000 students are facing an unexpected decision after they received acceptance notices from the University of Florida – only to find they would have to spend a year taking online classes. The 3,118 unidentified applicants were presumably delighted when they were accepted as freshmen by the university in Gainesville for the fall after sending in applications for traditional first-year slots. But after reading their congratulations notices, they apparently realized they would need to agree to spend their entire first year taking classes on the Internet in order to attend the public college. The classes are part of a new program – the Pathway to Campus Enrollment (PaCE) – which started in 2015 and aims to accommodate a higher number of students, The Washington Post reported.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3028025/Thousands-student-receive-acceptance-notices-University-Florida-spend-entire-year-taking-ONLINE-classes.html

Share on Facebook

Adult education models change; needs, passions remain

Sunday, April 12th, 2015

by Mitch LeClair, St. Cloud Times

Options for adult education have adjusted to modern needs throughout history, but technological advancements of the last few decades have accelerated the pace. It’s happening in European countries, India, China — and Minnesota. New methods of teaching are drawing learners away from traditional models, affecting how employers and students view degrees, other certifications and education in general.

http://www.sctimes.com/story/news/local/2015/04/05/adult-education-models-change-needs-passions-remain/25337183/

Share on Facebook

From MOOCs To Minerva: Higher Education And Beyond

Sunday, April 12th, 2015

BY Calvin Lemley, Forbes

The Minerva format focuses on seminar-based lessons, with instructors implementing methods such as pop quizzes, cold calls, and asking questions that students are required to answer, then called on to defend those answers. This would also cut down on time-wasting in class, with the instructor able to immediately quiz students on course material and just as quickly be able to receive and tabulate student responses, as well as streamlining the process for separating students into groups for cooperative assignments.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/berlinschoolofcreativeleadership/2015/04/06/from-moocs-to-minerva-higher-education-and-beyond/

Share on Facebook