Online degree units to cut tuition fees

May 28th, 2016

By Sean Coughlan, BBC

A UK online university network is claiming a “breakthrough moment” with a project which will allow students to cut the cost of a Russell Group degree by studying part of it online. A Futurelearn online course will provide credits towards a University of Leeds undergraduate degree. It will mean reducing the time and cost of tuition fees for a full degree. Futurelearn chairman Peter Horrocks says this will provide the flexibility needed by many students.  The online learning platform, which offers courses from more than 50 universities, was set up in 2013 by the Open University, as a UK provider for so-called Moocs (massive, open, online courses).

http://www.bbc.com/news/education-36378572

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IBM’s Big Data University: Free Online Learning With Over 400,000 Students

May 28th, 2016

by Bernard Marr, Forbes

Although there are a large number of startups in the field, one old name which is once again making waves is IBM. Its Big Data University initiative has now signed up over 400,000 students. Although it doesn’t charge for any of its courses, it takes a business-centric approach to delivery which sets it apart from many other online open course providers. Students can sign up independently at home and work at their own speed and on their own initiative, just as they can with Coursera and Futurelearn or other similar services. However, IBM also works with partners to tailor course packages to fill the needs of individual organizations.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/bernardmarr/2016/05/26/ibms-big-data-university-free-online-learning-with-over-400000-students/#38b52dd3452a

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$100K Machine Learning Challenge

May 28th, 2016

by Lucy Black, iProgrammer

In partnership with Udacity, Chinese ridesharing company Didi Chuxing has announced a global machine learning competition to come up with a better ride matching algorithm using Didi’s published data sets. The grand prize winner not only gets $100,000 and worldwide acclaim, and also a chance to work at the Didi Research Lab in China or Silicon Valley. The judging panel includes Sebastian Thrun, founder of Udacity and Peter Norvig, Director of Research at Google as well as He Xiaofei, President of the DIDI Research Institute.

http://i-programmer.info/news/204-challenges/9766-100k-machine-learning-challenge-.html

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Three Ways the Maker Movement Can Be More Inclusive of Women and People of Color

May 27th, 2016

By Suzette Duncan, Edsurge

Although most of the educators I know who self-identify as makers are women, some of them cite a lack of women in STEM fields and related pursuits as the very reason they are now makers. They are trying to change the landscape by encouraging young women and girls to become makers also. When I speak with people of color with about making, some discuss the lack of diversity when attending maker events. They rarely, if ever, see themselves represented. As a teacher and a woman of color, I am interested in shaping a Maker movement that reflects the diversity of people interested in creating, building, hacking, and tinkering.

http://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-05-23-three-ways-the-maker-movement-can-be-more-inclusive-to-women-and-people-of-color

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Teen to graduate high school with bachelor’s degree, no college debt

May 27th, 2016

by Bob Johnson, MLive

When Rachel Klammer finishes the last course she is currently enrolled in at Saginaw Valley State University, she will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in literature. Just a few weeks earlier, the 19-year-old Frankenmuth teen received her high school diploma. She follows in the footsteps of her sister, Sarah, who a year ago accomplished the same feat of graduating high school while earning a 4-year college degree. “It feels great that I’m done with undergrad,” Rachel Klammer said. “It’s kind of like I’ve just added four years to my life because all of my other friends are just starting college and I’m already starting my masters.” How did she and her sister do it? Rachel Klammer, who describes herself as “sort of a nerd,” began taking college classes at age 14 after enrolling in a program called the Paris Academy of Co-Secondary Education, or PACE. PACE is a dual enrollment program that allows students of any age to attend college or career-technical/CTE classes.

http://www.mlive.com/news/saginaw/index.ssf/2016/05/teen_graduating_high_school_wi.html

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Technology can be the big disruptor and innovator in education

May 27th, 2016

by Ashish Dhawan and Namita Dalmia, Economic Times

Technology has a huge potential to disrupt the education space in all three categories: (i) student’s preparation (ii) educator’s effectiveness and (iii) administration’s efficiency. Personalised tools help students learn and progress at their pace. Such tools, when integrated with the classroom, allow teachers to track the learning data of each child and provide individual intervention.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/services/education/technology-can-be-the-big-disruptor-and-innovator-in-education/articleshow/52378695.cms

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How this 16-year-old is teaching the world to code

May 26th, 2016

by Anita Balakrishnan, CNBC

High school junior Moksh Jawa is only 16 years old, but thousands of people around the world are turning to him to learn a valuable skill: coding. Jawa, the author of “Decoding AP Computer Science A: For a High Schooler, By a High Schooler,” is also the self-taught brains behind a free online computer course that has 4,000 students enrolled. “Going through the entire experience, I know that if the resources I had used had been paid, I wouldn’t have learned computer science,” Jawa said. “It’s my way of giving back. I’ve learned so much from the online community. Computer science is such an important skill it should be offered for free.”

http://www.cnbc.com/2016/05/19/how-this-16-year-old-is-teaching-the-world-to-code.html

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District to offer summer courses

May 26th, 2016

By Samm Quinn, Daily Reporter

Mt. Vernon School Corp. is offering all students the option this year to enroll in summer school — a program historically reserved for those who had fallen behind. The program gives students — even those who aren’t struggling — the flexibility to continue learning through the summer, even if they can’t be on campus. High school students will be able to take their summer courses online, so they can take the class anywhere. Elementary and middle school students will take two-week courses at Fortville Elementary and the high school focused on reading, math and language arts, while high school students will have the opportunity to earn extra credits on and off campus, through online learning, in a number of courses.

http://www.greenfieldreporter.com/view/local_story/District-to-offer-summer-cours_1463789834

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Surprise! Data science, technology among key higher ed growth areas

May 26th, 2016

By Tara García Mathewson, Education Dive

New research from Learning House aims to help colleges and universities think about the future of higher education. While many of the findings should not be a surprise to those inside the evolving educational landscape, “Growth Opportunities in Higher Education: Degrees and Alternate Pathways,” may provide some external validation of strategic plans at colleges and universities across the country. The report projects high-demand online bachelor’s, master’s, MBA and doctoral degree programs of the future, along with alternative learning pathways that are bound to gain in popularity. “This research underscores that for higher education institutions to thrive, it’s critical that they’re flexible in how, where, and what they offer to students,” said Learning House CEO Todd Zipper in a prepared statement.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/surprise-data-science-technology-among-key-higher-ed-growth-areas/418204/

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Online alternatives expand options for home-based learners

May 25th, 2016

by Marla R. Miller, Second Wave Media

Whether it’s due to special needs, behavioral issues, learning delays, health problems, bullying at school, intense athletic training schedules, extensive travel or other extenuating circumstances, many families are turning to online learning for their children’s education. Virtual offerings for students of all ages have been growing for the past decade. In 2006, Michigan became the first state in the country to make online learning a requirement for high school graduation. It’s evolved from high school students taking special languages or Advanced Placement courses, to home-schoolers taking advantage of free online electives through their local public schools. The majority of students participate in some form of blended learning, using online classes to supplement traditional school. But the expansion of for-profit online charter academies continues to transform the face of today’s home-schooler.

http://www.secondwavemedia.com/southwest-michigan/features/Online-alternatives-expand-options-for-home-0519.aspx

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Common Active Learning Mistakes

May 25th, 2016

by Richard M. Felder and Rebecca Brent, Tomorrow’s Professor

Active learning is an easy and remarkably robust teaching method that functions well in every conceivable academic setting – a claim supported by a mountain of literature. Instructors who start using it often limit its effectiveness by making certain mistakes, however, and many drop the method when the results disappoint them or they experience vigorous student resistance. Table 6.5-1 lists six mistakes to avoid when you use active learning and strategies to avoid making them, and the paragraphs that follow elaborate on the strategies.

https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1491

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Facebook Schools MOOCs on Engagement

May 25th, 2016

By Jason Schmitt, EdSurge

If MOOCs want to build student engagement, they may want to take a lesson from Facebook. That’s the takeaway from a recent study by researchers at Pennsylvania State University and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who found students favor using Facebook groups over MOOC forums in part because they have more positive interactions on the social media site and feel a stronger sense of community there. Trust plays a role; on Facebook the students tended to use their “real” names and could see one another’s profiles. Researchers at Pennsylvania State University and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory analyzed data on student use of forums for three MOOCs from Coursera and course-related Facebook groups, and interviewed instructors and a dozen students. The research was presented at the ACM conference on Learning at Scale.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-05-19-facebook-schools-moocs-on-engagement

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Common Misconceptions About Machine Learning in Cybersecurity

May 24th, 2016

by SVEN KRASSER AND DMITRI ALPEROVITCH, Information Management Online

Machine learning has never been more accessible than it is right now. Amazon utilizes it to uncover shopping habits and Netflix uses it to propose personalized movie selections. Many tech giants, both in the consumer and the business-facing arena, are using machine learning to build intelligent processes that can solve everything from creating more targeted search engine results to bigger challenges like climate change and cancer diagnostics. Leaders in the cybersecurity space are utilizing machine learning in a similar fashion. While there is a lot of buzz in the marketplace about the potential of the approach to solve persistent issues like silent failure and false positives, there are many misconceptions about how the technology is being applied in the field.

http://www.information-management.com/news/security/common-misconceptions-about-machine-learning-in-cybersecurity-10028853-1.html

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How Online Learning Is Shaping the UK Workforce

May 24th, 2016

by Jermaine Haughton, Managers.org

The appetite for online learning is on the up. Online education provider Coursera revealed it has experienced a 50% increase in new registrations over the last 12 months, with a large majority of this increase coming from workers in their mid-twenties or older who already have strong work experience. “Learning is not just an activity for the young anymore,” said Rick Levin, CEO of Coursera and former President of Yale University. “Over 80% of online learners on Coursera are over the age of 22.

http://www.managers.org.uk/insights/news/2016/may/how-online-learning-is-shaping-the-uk-workforce

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Tableau Announces New Data Analytics Learning Partnerships With Lynda.com, Pluralsight, Udacity and General Assembly

May 24th, 2016

by Tableau Software

Tableau Software announced new partnerships aimed at helping people more easily acquire data analysis skills needed for today’s workforce. Lynda.com, a LinkedIn company, and Pluralsight. In addition, Tableau is partnering with Udacity, an online education company focused on getting jobs for students with over 4 million taking its courses, and General Assembly (GA), the global education company that specializes in the most in-demand skills, to offer deeper training skills to current and future expert data scientists. Demand for data analytics skills has risen globally and employers seek to hire data driven people. In fact, the business social network LinkedIn listed Statistical Analysis and Data Mining as the number two skill in their list of the “25 Professional Skills That Will Be Hot in 2016,” and a joint study from Burning Glass Technologies and General Assembly reported demand for data science skills has tripled over the past five years.

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E-learning makes basic employment skills available to all

May 23rd, 2016

BY ELSAMARI BOTHA, HR News

The exponential rate of information has led to the creation of a new kind of educator: low-cost, on-demand, short-length education providers, providing courses on everything from gardening to robotics at lower costs than traditional universities and colleges. These are generally divided into two types: immersive educators such as Hack Bright that tend to focus on computer programming and massive open online courses (MOOC) such as Coursera that focus on collaborative and individualised learning. The growth of immersives and especially MOOCs around the world is a sign of how quickly digital innovation is changing the world and jobs market. The skills required for the new jobs on the cutting edge of innovation are changing rapidly and new job types are being created all the time. As innovative as the alternative educators have been, they have targeted the higher-income population group.

http://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/196/362/144756.html

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New Workers, New Skills

May 23rd, 2016

by Marina Gorbis, EDUCAUSE Review

As the world of work undergoes transformation, new worker categories are emerging—people who, by choice or by necessity, are thinking about making a living in new ways and who are putting work into a very different context. At the Institute for the Future (IFTF), our team of ethnographers has been exploring these new worker categories while conducting in-depth interviews and observations in various locations around the United States. These workers span different levels of skills and different levels of engagement with work, from those who simply rent their assets (e.g., homes, cars) to generate income streams to those who work in new ways full-time. Such workers include micro-workers, dream builders, amplified entrepreneurs, and makers and hackers.

http://er.educause.edu/articles/2016/5/new-workers-new-skills

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Penn State Responds to Surge of Interest in Skills-Based Online Teaching Certificate

May 23rd, 2016

by EdSurge

Last fall Pennsylvania State University’s World Campus launched a small, free skills-focused certificate program meant to help 30 graduate students develop online teaching abilities—but 350 actually showed up, and now the university plans to shake up its professional development to reflect the swell of interest. Laurence Boggess, director of faculty development for the World Campus, told Inside Higher Ed he believes this reflects a larger shift: “These graduate students who are about to go off and be the professors of the future, they get it. They understand that they’re going to be teaching online at some point, and they understand that online education—for better or worse—is not going anywhere.”

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-05-03-penn-state-responds-to-surge-of-interest-in-skills-based-online-teaching-certificate

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Using MOOC Data for Your Benefit

May 22nd, 2016

by Lee Maxey, Chief Learning Officer

If chief learning officers could tap into research showing how people are learning most effectively online, it could greatly improve learning content. By talking to universities about their approach to, and results from, online learning, CLOs could change the way their learning and development teams design courses and think about learning. For instance, a plethora of schools publish massive open online courses, or MOOCs. Organizations like edX, launched by Harvard University and MIT, have added dozens of leading schools to present free courses online. Coursera and Udacity have, too. Each of these organizations, and the schools that supply courses, extract heaps of data about what people are clicking on to learn, which in turn demonstrates retention rates. If learning leaders want to understand this data, they can start by contacting the person running the MOOCs for, say, HarvardX or the Harvard Business School. Boston’s Berkelee College of Music supplies MOOCs via something akin to a startup, which is run from within the school itself.

http://www.clomedia.com/2016/05/13/using-mooc-data-for-your-benefit/

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NComputing provides easy access to Windows on Chromebook

May 22nd, 2016

by eSchool News

NComputing has launched the Chromebook CX110 and Chrome app, giving U.S. schools the ability to easily run Windows applications on their Chromebooks. More than half of all computers used in U.S. K-12 schools are Chromebooks, and now NComputing Chromebooks – with the vSpace client – provides easy, multi-user access to the Windows, Java or Silverlight applications often necessary for learning and testing applications. vSpace software benefits schools by providing a centrally managed, reliable and scalable solution that delivers as many as one hundred individual Windows desktops from a single computer. This creates a cost-effective and easy-to-deploy solution for schools who can now use a single Chromebook device to access all their ChromeOS and Windows applications.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2016/05/13/company-provides-a-windows-desktop-on-chromebooks/

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Social media’s top 50 colleges and universities

May 22nd, 2016

BY RONALD BETHKE, eCampusNews

Engagement, impact and responsiveness were all key to landing a spot on the list of the best institutions on social media. Technology and data company Engagement Labs released its 2016 ranking of the top 50 U.S. colleges and universities on social media networks Facebook and Twitter. As the higher education landscape becomes more competitive than ever, social media has become an increasingly important way for colleges and universities to gain an edge over one another. Social media is especially helpful for schools not only with regards to recruitment and retention, but also to communicate with current and prospective students in a timely and effective manner that matches their tastes.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/social-media-colleges/

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