Should you treat your school like a business?

February 12th, 2016

BY LAURA DEVANEY, eSchool News

The idea of treating students, parents and the school community as customers isn’t an entirely new one, but it’s still one that makes some school leaders balk. After all, schools are institutions of learning, and traditionally, they have not been thought of as businesses. But with the growth of charter schools and online schools, parents have other options to explore if their child’s school does not meet expectations — and when students leave, so, too, does funding. And in an effort to increase parental engagement and ensure that parents and community members feel as though they are part of their children’s school, the newly-passed Every Student Succeeds Act includes multiple methods to increase parental engagement, including expanded accessibility, regular two-way communication, and enhanced parent and family engagement policies.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2016/02/05/should-you-treat-your-school-like-a-business/

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PwC tells universities to adapt or perish

February 12th, 2016

by Tim Dodd, Financial Review

There are clear signs that digital disruption is transforming universities and leaving behind those that can’t adapt fast enough. Not surprisingly this seems to be more apparent to students, who come from the generation of digital natives, than to many university academics and administrators. Last week the Australian Higher Education Industrial Association, the registered employer organisation for higher education providers, published a report it commissioned from PwC titled Australian Higher Education Workforce of the Future. It explores what the employment model for universities is likely to be 10 or 20 years hence, when the full impact of digital disruption, as well as other change-makers like fee deregulation and increased competition, will have hit.

http://www.afr.com/leadership/careers/pwc-tells-universities-to-adapt-or-perish-20160204-gmm2ek

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You don’t need an Ivy League degree to make a lot of money in these fields

February 12th, 2016

By Jillian Berman, Market Watch

Graduates of top-tier schools who major in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) don’t earn much more than graduates of schools that are easier to get into, according to research from Michael Hilmer, an economist at San Diego State University, and Eric Eide and Mark Showalter, economists at Brigham Young University. But for students who major in business or liberal arts, where you go to school matters — business majors from top schools make 12% more than those from midtier schools and 18% more than their colleagues from bottom tier schools, for example.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/you-dont-need-an-ivy-league-degree-to-make-a-lot-of-money-in-these-fields-2016-02-02

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King’s College head: ignoring online education is big danger

February 11th, 2016

By John Elmes, Times Higher Education

Ed Byrne, president and principal of King’s College London, believes that any university not exploring the world of distance education will find itself in “real trouble” because no institution is “immune to disruption”. Speaking during a debate at education company Pearson about online learning’s impact on global higher education, Professor Byrne said: “If I look ahead and think of the range of things universities do, we’re going to have to have superb technological environments everywhere – whether it’s in e-education…or on-campus [education]. He said he hoped that “the need for accelerated, exponential change will be met by the sector”. But he added: “I think places that just ignore all this – business as usual, nothing changes – will be in real trouble in every aspect of what they do.”

https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/kings-college-head-ignoring-online-education-big-danger

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China vs. the machine (learning)

February 11th, 2016

By Taylor Armerding, CSO

If American businesses want to curb the theft of their trade secrets and intellectual property by other countries, they are going to have to do it themselves. Experts say their best hope is machine learning. In the ongoing war against economic espionage – especially by China – the good news for the American private sector is that machine learning (ML) and behavioral analytics, are offering some promise of detecting hackers before they start exfiltrating trade secrets and intellectual property (IP).

http://www.csoonline.com/article/3029622/security/china-vs-the-machine-learning.html

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UC-Berkeley deals with backlash from secret monitoring

February 11th, 2016

By Tara García Mathewson, Education Dive

The University of California System is taking heat from faculty at UC Berkeley after a faculty member on the campus IT committee sent an email to his colleagues explaining the extent of a new computer network monitoring system. The Daily Bruin reports the new system was installed following an attack on UCLA Health in July 2015 and kept quiet until last week, secretly monitoring and possibly recording all traffic into and out of the campus network. While the university has said it is not reading faculty emails, privacy concerns have been raised, as well as concerns that the system acted without regard to proper shared governance procedures.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/uc-berkeley-deals-with-backlash-from-secret-monitoring/413330/

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Industry perspective: What to expect in higher ed-tech this year

February 10th, 2016

By Jon Phillips, eCampus News

2016 will be an incredible year for advancements in technology and we will see considerable implications and opportunities in education, from more personalized and meaningful learning to an evolving shift in learning environments. Based on our longtime work in higher education and ongoing conversations with our customers and stakeholders, we’ve identified a few areas where we expect technology to play a larger role for educators and students.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/higher-ed-tech-170/

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Unlocking Predictive Analytics to Improve Student Engagement and Retention

February 10th, 2016

by Gates Bryant, Campus Technology

The year 2015 was a turning point for data analytics technology. Now is the time for higher education institutions to put data to use and give students the advising support they need to succeed. 2015 was a turning point with notable shifts in how technologies are built to capture data, how campuses use data, and even the business activity in the data analytics space. These changes signal that colleges and universities are on the precipice of being able to take student success data out from behind the glass and use it to engage students and improve retention and graduation rates. But the proof will be in the pudding.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/01/28/unlocking-predictive-analytics-to-improve-student-engagement-and-retention.aspx

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Building a Blueprint for Better E-Books

February 10th, 2016

By Frank DiMaria, Campus Technology

Whenever students at Brookdale Community College have free time, they typically engage with their mobile devices, according to Mike Qaissaunee, chair of the Engineering and Technology department at the Lincroft, NJ, institution. That observation led him to wonder if he could create academic content and deliver it directly to students’ mobile devices. Not the static content they’re used to, but interactive content that would lure them into using their devices for academics. “Any free time they had, like waiting in line for a bus or in the cafeteria waiting in line to get some food — we could capture those moments and engage them with content,” said Qaissaunee.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/02/03/building-a-blueprint-for-better-e-books.aspx

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6 influential technologies on the higher ed horizon

February 9th, 2016

By Meris Stansbury, eCampus News

Annual Horizon Report details short-and long-term technologies, trends that will impact higher education in the next 5 years. The rise of robots is no longer science fiction; and any institution interested in remaining relevant in the next five years should start advancing “cultures of innovation.” These are just two of the revelations part of the New Media Consortium’s (NMC) and EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative’s (ELI) 2016 Higher Education Edition of the annual Horizon Report.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/horizon-report-2016-278/

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New type of remediation is making waves in higher ed

February 9th, 2016

By Ron Bethke, eCampus News

With corequisite remediation, however, students can enroll directly into college-level courses and receive academic support alongside their regular classes, states the report. Instead of taking numerous prerequisite, non-credit courses, students learn the needed material while working toward their degree. Within their college-level courses, additional class periods or customized support in a lab provide opportunities for academic support and tutoring when bridges need to be gaped.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/corequisite-remediation-achievement-265/

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Report: Wearable Devices To Top $28 Billion in Sales in 2016

February 9th, 2016

By Joshua Bolkan, THE Journal

Wearable electronic device sales will increase 18.4 percent year over year to hit 274.6 million shipments in 2016, according to a new forecast from market research firm Gartner. Of the $28.7 billion the company predicts sales of the devices will generate in revenue, $11.5 billion will come from smartwatches alone. “From 2015 through 2017, smartwatch adoption will have 48 percent growth largely due to Apple popularizing wearables as a lifestyle trend.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/02/03/research-wearable-devices-to-top-28-billion-in-sales-in-2016.aspx

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President Calls on Country to Deliver CS Education to All Students

February 8th, 2016

By Dian Schaffhauser, THE Journal

President Obama said he wants to see a stronger commitment to computer science in American schools, and he’s laid out a new initiative to make that a reality. The “Computer Science for All” program will seek Congressional funding to add CS at all levels of K-12, the use of resources at federal agencies such as the National Science Foundation (NSF) to expand CS training for teachers and public and private support for promoting CS education. “In the new economy, computer science isn’t an optional skill — it’s a basic skill, right along with the three ‘Rs,’” Obama said during his weekly Saturday morning address, in which he announced the initiative.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/02/01/obama-calls-on-country-to-deliver-cs-education-to-all-students.aspx

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EdTech: Why Digital Is The Future Of Business Education

February 8th, 2016

by Seb Murray, Business Because

2016 looks set to be a year of further disruption and digitization in the business ed space. Online programs have exploded, prompted by the rise of innovative online learning companies like Coursera or edX and the growing appetite for digital degrees from young managers who are questioning the cost and value of a campus course. But what is the future of online learning? Will the university as we know it be upended by tech-savvy challengers? Will MBA students study from their sofas instead of multi-million dollar bricks-and-mortar facilities?

https://www.businessbecause.com/news/mba-distance-learning/3756/why-digital-is-future-of-business-education

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AP biology classes flipped on head as part of new teaching method

February 8th, 2016

By Angela Deines, The Capital-Journal

Mike Steinert and Ryan Pfeifer, honors and AP biology instructors at Washburn Rural High School, implemented a “flipped” or “blended” teaching model at the beginning of the 2015-16 school year. The model turns the traditional method on its head, having students listen to lectures online outside of class while classroom work is devoted to more interactive learning. Steinert and Pfeifer said while there was resistance to the new model at first, student and parent attitudes have since shifted and higher test scores from previous years have resulted.

http://m.cjonline.com/news/2016-01-31/washburn-rural-honors-ap-biology-classes-flipped-head-part-new-teaching-method

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Savannah-Chatham public schools moving away from textbooks

February 7th, 2016

By Jenel Few, Savannah Now

The teacher sends a text alert about an upcoming test. The parent instructs the child to pull out her books. They’re going to review key points from the chapter. The study session goes downhill from there. There is no textbook. However, the links to the study guide won’t open. She can’t remember her online login to access the PowerPoint presentation, and she didn’t take notes in class because the teacher usually posts them on his website. “We’re in the beginning of that new age — the transition zone — and it’s creating difficulty for parents and even some teachers who want books and specific learning materials provided for them,” said Savannah-Chatham Public Schools Superintendent Thomas Lockamy. “They want to go page by page through a textbook. But when their students go to take the state test, they find that the standards are all over the place. You just can’t teach the old way anymore.”

http://savannahnow.com/news/2016-01-30/savannah-chatham-public-schools-moving-away-textbooks

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Never mind classrooms, Dubai kids being taught in ‘blended learning plazas’

February 7th, 2016

by Nadeem Hanif, The National UAE

A school in the emirate is changing the way lessons are taught by changing the layout of classrooms. Gems Wellington Academy in the Silicon Oasis has merged 12 classrooms into a “blended learning plaza”. The new space has a conference area and corners where pupils can use computers to enhance their learning. Furniture can be rearranged to suit lesson requirements. “It’s a huge, open space and we have soft furnishings as well as wall screens that pupils can use to write and work on,” said Tracy Moxley, the school’s associate principal. The switch to a “third teacher” concept is to provide space to eliminate distractions and improve learning. The concept prioritises children’s learning environment.

http://www.thenational.ae/uae/education/never-mind-classrooms-dubai-kids-being-taught-in-blended-learning-plazas

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Students favour online technology in ‘flipped’ classroom models

February 7th, 2016

by Sarah Muller, Sydney Morning Herald

As school kicks off for another year, an increasing number of teachers are ditching traditional teaching models for “flipped” classroom programs, which rely on engagement with online learning content at home. In a “flipped” class structure, students complete the traditional aspects of schoolwork at home through online technologies such as videos, podcasts and interactive forums. In fact, students across Australia are increasingly relying on various online technologies for study, according to a report published by the NBN last week. Three-quarters of parents surveyed by the NBN said their children use online programs for learning at home, while more than half watch video tutorials for homework help.

http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/students-favour-online-technology-in-flipped-classroom-models-20160126-gme25y.html

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Unlocking the Code for Robotics in the Classroom

February 6th, 2016

by Julia L. Dwek, Edutopia

In President Obama’s final State of the Union address, he expressed the importance of “helping students learn to write computer code.” In a recent YouTube video for Code.org, Obama spoke to students, urging them to “master the tools and technology that will change just about everything.” Obama is correct. Our students’ focus must shift from passive purveyors of technology to creators of programs, apps, and inventions. We must push them past low levels of static reception into a dynamic mindset, highlighting and nourishing thought and imagination to improve our world.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/unlocking-code-robotics-in-classroom-julia-dweck

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Orcs, robots and more in new School District 60 online courses

February 6th, 2016

by Bronwyn Scott, Alaska Highway News

Biotechnology, early childhood education, Lord of the Rings, and women’s studies are some of the new course offerings senior secondary students can take from the comfort of their own home. During Monday’s board meeting, School District 60 trustees approved 12 new online classes that will be added to the Northern B.C. Distance Education (NBCDE) course catalogue. The new courses include Art in World Cultures, Cosmetology: Cutting Edge Styles, Introduction to Agriscience, Lord of the Rings: Films and their Literary Influences, as well as some practical offerings for the Peace Region such as Working in the Resource Sector. Robotics 12 was also approved for implementation at North Peace Secondary School.

http://www.alaskahighwaynews.ca/fort-st-john/orcs-robots-and-more-in-new-school-district-60-online-courses-1.2161738

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Obama wants $4B to help students learn computer science

February 6th, 2016

by Carlene Superville, Associated Press

President Barack Obama said Saturday he’ll ask Congress for billions of dollars to help students learn computer science skills and prepare for jobs in a changing economy. “In the new economy, computer science isn’t an optional skill. It’s a basic skill, right along with the three Rs,” Obama said in his weekly radio and Internet address. Obama said only about one-fourth of K-12 schools offer computer science instruction, but that most parents want their children to develop analytical and coding skills.

http://www.fosters.com/article/20160130/NEWS/160139961

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