Report: Wearable Shipments to Top 100 Million This Year

June 29th, 2016

By Joshua Bolkan, Campus Technology

Global shipments of wearable devices will grow 29 percent over 2015 to hit 101.9 million units this year according to a new forecast from market research firm International Data Corp. (IDC). The segment will continue to see strong growth, according to the company, at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 20.3 percent through 2020, when it will ship 213.6 million units. The market leaders throughout the forecast period will remain watches and wrist bands.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/06/22/report-wearable-shipments-to-top-100-million-this-year.aspx

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Research Suggests Students Learn More When Working Together in Virtual Reality Games

June 29th, 2016

By Michael Hart, Campus Technology

In the game, which is intended to help students learn Japanese — although it is designed to teach other languages as well — players go on “quests” to learn new words by watching game characters talk to each other. For instance, as one character walks away, another that is left behind says, “Sayonara.” The hope is that the player understands “Sayonara” means “goodbye.” At that point, the player can drag the word from a speech balloon into an inventory of terms that can later be used to construct sentences. In one group, students were connected via a chat interface with another player who could, if they wanted, offer advice on how to play. The second group played a version of the game in which they were definitely required to collaborate on quests. The research group found the students in the second so-called “high-interdependence” group spent more time communicating and, as a consequence, learned more words.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/06/22/research-suggests-students-learn-more-when-working-together-in-virtual-reality-games.aspx

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FCC Chairman Gets Educated on VR at Stanford

June 29th, 2016

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

A day after the a federal appeals court upheld net neutrality rules put into place last year by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the guy who heads that agency had a chance to try out virtual reality (VR) and to ask questions of Stanford University experts about how VR might affect future policy decisions. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler visited the university specifically to check in on the Virtual Human Interaction Lab. The mission of that lab is to understand the impact of VR on interactions among people residing in digital worlds. Wheeler used the visit to emphasize the importance of “unfettered access to the entire web,” as he said in a prepared statement regarding the DC Circuit ruling. “Virtual reality shouldn’t have gatekeepers,” he told those participating in his Stanford visit. “It starts with an internet that is fast, fair and open.”

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/06/22/fcc-chairman-gets-educated-on-vr-at-stanford.aspx

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Technology key to university branding strategies

June 28th, 2016

By Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

eCampus News lays out three strategies to promote a successful branding campaign; digital archives and delivery systems are key for schools that want to expanding quality branding in recruitment, retention and community outreach. Building strong visual identity begins with feedback and support from campus stakeholders, and must be enforced with firm rules on presentation and usage. Making logos and marks accessible is critical to a successful branding campaign. Maintaining updated photo repositories and breaking down bureaucracy in securing these tools encourages institutional buy-in and support for branding guidelines.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/technology-key-to-university-branding-strategies/421329/

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Adaptive Learning Holds Promise for the Future of Higher Education

June 28th, 2016

by Education Dive

As an educational model, differentiated instruction has been around since the time of Socrates. As a method of providing a classroom of students, often with differing abilities, instruction based on individual aptitudes for learning, it has been an effective alternative to repetitive rote memorization that is still widely practiced in many countries around the world. Today, with the widespread availability of new learning software and platforms, differentiated instruction can take on a revolutionary role under the guise of adaptive learning, and it could alter our thinking about education and the way students learn.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/study-examines-why-students-choose-for-profit-education/421361/

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Growing Pains at Online Education Startup Udemy Hit as Amazon Rumors Swirl

June 28th, 2016

by Claire Groden, Inverse

Enter Amazon. The retail giant and growing media presence might be considering a foray into the online education space: four instructors who asked to remain anonymous say they’ve been approached by Amazon to post their courses on the company’s newest service. And after $173 million of investment, the highly leveraged Udemy is going to have to start showing revenue — not just a growing student count that many instructors say is dramatically exaggerated.

https://www.inverse.com/article/17307-growing-pains-at-online-education-startup-udemy-hit-as-amazon-rumors-swirl

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Bay Area Organizations Help Refugees Access Free, Online Educations

June 27th, 2016

by CBS San Francisco

Bay Area organizationsare helping refugees access free, online educational courses through Coursera via Stanford University, the University of California, and other major universities around the world. In an effort to increase access to education for refugees and non-profit organizations that serve refugee populations, Mountain View-based, Coursera.org launched the Coursera for Refugees program on Monday, in honor of World Refugee Day. Globally, a record 65.3 million people were displaced from their homes by persecution and conflict in 2015, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Coursera, a for-profit, venture capital-backed provider of onlinecourses, is now offering thousands of courses to refugees, as well as specialized courses such as English for Business and Entrepreneurship via the University of Pennsylvania, Career Success via the University of California, Irvine and Python for Everybody via the University of Michigan.

http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2016/06/21/bay-area-organizations-help-refugees-access-free-online-educations/

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No more classroom, no more books: Hazelwood Elementary takes wireless learning outdoors

June 27th, 2016

By Jeremy Eaton, CBC News

Hazelwood Elementary will move some of its classes outside in September thanks to new technology recently installed at the St. John’s school. On Monday morning, teachers and students at Hazelwood launched their wireless outdoor classroom. “It’s a very special day,” said principal Dale Lambe. “One of our teachers had the idea that, not only could we construct an outdoor classroom but make it more accessible for all and make it more appealing for learners in the 21st century.” Most of the total cost of about $18,000 came from government funding and construction took about a week. Using wireless Internet and tablets, students will be able to use apps to study nature and the school’s outdoor surroundings.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/hazelwood-elementary-wireless-outdoor-classroom-1.3643324
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Study: In-school support crucial for Montana online classes

June 27th, 2016

By MATT HOFFMAN, Billings Gazette

This year, Montana Digital Academy took steps to add more on-the-ground support for students in the online program’s credit recovery courses. Now, a report from a Portland, Ore.-based education research group backs that decision up. Education Northwest found that schools with higher passing rates offered more in-school structure and support for students in credit recovery. Data from the 2013-2014 school year shows passing rates varied wildly from school to school, although many schools had very small samples.

http://billingsgazette.com/news/local/education/study-in-school-support-crucial-for-montana-online-classes/article_3d7c080e-b2d5-5d9c-be90-a7e3813af9b2.html

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IBM to give $2.4 million to entrepreneurs in India taking courses from Coursera

June 26th, 2016

By tech2 News Staff

IBM India announced today that it will source entrepreneurs with high potential from India to invite them into its Global Entrepreneur program from Coursera’s series of courses under “Full Stack Web Development Specialization”. The series is being offered by the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. According to the announcement, at least 20 participants taking the online course and meeting the criteria by IBM will be accepted in IBM Global Entrepreneur. The selected participants will be given $120,000 in credit to access IBM Cloud services in credit in addition to the invites to apply to represent their startup at IBM SmartCamp 2016, a mentoring Bootcamp and pitch competition between rising startups from all over the world.

http://tech.firstpost.com/news-analysis/ibm-to-give-2-4-million-to-entrepreneurs-in-india-taking-courses-from-coursera-322113.html

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Google and Udacity launch a new Android programming course for beginners

June 26th, 2016

by Lucia Maffei, Tech Crunch

Google wants more people to learn to program — especially for its Android platform. While the company already offered a few programming courses, they were typically geared toward students with at least some rudimentary programming experience. Starting today, the Google Android Basics Nanodegree class is available on the online learning platform Udacity. It’s the first Android nanodegree class designed by Google for people with no programming experience at all. “Google, in partnership with Udacity, is making Android development accessible and understandable to everyone, so that regardless of your background, you can learn to build apps that improve the lives of people around you,” Shanea King-Roberson, program manager at Google, said in a blog post.

https://techcrunch.com/2016/06/22/google-and-udacity-launch-a-new-android-programming-course-for-beginners/?ncid=mobilenavtrend

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Daphne Koller: Soft skills are overlooked and undervalued

June 26th, 2016

by Rebecca Smith, Management Today

But which skills does Koller think students should be really swotting up on for future success? ‘One of the bigger ones we’re seeing is the ability to handle data,’ she says. ‘I don’t just mean big data, but data-oriented thinking and business analytics.’ Koller then points to an often overlooked set of skills as those that’ll always be valuable. ‘The whole range of soft skills is also very important,’ she says. ‘We’re getting to a point where the world is changing really fast so concrete skills that are important today might not be useful tomorrow.’ But the abilities to formulate a problem, work well within a team, accept responsibilities and be flexible don’t have a sell-by date. ‘All of those skills that I think for a while weren’t seen as important will be for a long time.’

http://www.managementtoday.co.uk/news/1399477/daphne-koller-soft-skills-overlooked-undervalued/

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ALEX Wants to Fill Classrooms Like Airbnb Fills Beds

June 25th, 2016

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

“In a world where we can place people in empty seats in cars and empty beds in houses, why not place people in empty chairs in college classrooms?” That’s what a team of Harvard University students say about their new start-up called ALEX (Anyone’s Learning EXperience). The students recently won a Public Sector Innovation Award for their work from the Technology and Entrepreneurship Center at Harvard. The idea behind ALEX is this: Universities and colleges with empty seats in some of their courses make those available through the site, and employers that want employees to obtain continuing education can subsidize enrollment for their people. The platform matches company need with excess classroom capacity.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/06/15/alex-wants-to-fill-classrooms-like-airbnb-fills-beds.aspx

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Want a high-paying job? Get a ‘nanodegree’

June 25th, 2016

by Clay Dillow, CNBC.com

In an effort to address the skills shortage, three-year-old Udacity (2016 CNBC Disruptor No. 12) has partnered with tech giants such as AT&T, Google, Facebook and Amazon to reinvent job training. The company — founded by Stanford professor and onetime Google VP Sebastian Thrun — has repositioned its focus from massive open online courses (MOOCs) to certification training on very specific skills. Students can earn what’s called a nanodegree and learn things like front-end web developing, iOS and Android programming, or machine learning in less than a year — and for less than $1,000.

http://www.cnbc.com/2016/06/20/udacity-reinvents-skills-training-with-the-nanodegree.html

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Coursera’s Koller: ‘Yesterday’s degree doesn’t prepare for tomorrow’s jobs’

June 25th, 2016

By Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

Coursera President and Co-Founder Daphne Koller says that the college diploma of 15 years ago doesn’t provide the necessary skills for a job in the 21st century. According to her podcast interview with Recode, Koller says that expanding educational access with coursework designed for skill-building in key industries is the way to increase interest in education and career preparation. Koller says that artificial intelligence and virtual reality components of learning will replace traditional classroom lectures.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/courseras-koller-yesterdays-degree-doesnt-prepare-for-tomorrows-jobs/421277/

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New sites use research to help students select the right college

June 24th, 2016

by eSchool News

A series of state-specific websites, grounded in work conducted by the American Institutes for Research (AIR), will offer students a new way to plan for life after high school. Its interactive features show the potential return on investment for a wide array of higher education choices. The first “Launch My Career” website, launched in Denver, will help students identify in-demand jobs across Colorado and in particular regions of the state, and will help students identify majors, as well as degree or certificate programs, that will help prepare them for those jobs.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2016/06/20/air-research-fuels-launch-my-career-website/

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Internet of Things, Machine Learning & Robotics Are High Priorities For Developers In 2016

June 24th, 2016

by Louis Columbus, Forbes

56.4% of developers are building robotics apps today.

45% of developers say that Internet of Things (IoT) development is critical to their overall digital strategy.

56.4% of developers are building robotics apps today.

45% of developers say that Internet of Things (IoT) development is critical to their overall digital strategy.

27.4% of all developers are building apps in the cloud today.

24.7% are using machine learning for development projects.

These and many other insights are from the Evans Data Corporation Global Development Survey, Volume 1 (PDF, client access) published earlier this month. The methodology was based on interviews with developers actively creating new applications with the latest technologies.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/louiscolumbus/2016/06/18/internet-of-things-machine-learning-robotics-are-high-priorities-for-developers-in-2016/#1f4e1e835644

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How Online Middle School Classes Prepare Your Student for Higher Learning

June 24th, 2016

by the Sequitur

Your child’s middle school educational years are incredibly important. This is the time that students become more independent, more responsible for their education and more vested in their commitment to learning. In seventh and eighth grade, curriculum becomes more rigorous than it was in early educational years. Expectations rise as students are taught to develop and refine their study habits and gain more advanced analytical and problem-solving skills. The priority is to help online learners continue to grow their knowledge base while preparing for the demands they’ll need to meet once they advance to a high school education. Linked below are some of the things online middle school classes are designed to help students achieve:

https://www.thesequitur.com/how-online-middle-school-classes-prepare-your-student-for-higher-learning-1268946/

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The digital-first district where OER meets iPads

June 23rd, 2016

By KATHERINE SCHAEFFER, Beaver County Times

Teachers and students at one district are replacing print with digital. By and large, it’s working. For students at Central Valley middle and high schools, accessing classroom lessons rarely involves opening a book. Instead, they power up glowing iPad screens and swipe and tap their way through math problems, the day’s reading or interactive content. In high school math teacher Joe Sowinski’s classes, technology has changed class structure. Students tackle lessons at their own pace as they work in groups to focus on concepts they find most challenging. “I spend less time waiting for students to copy notes and more time helping students work problems,” Sowinski said. Central Valley School District administrators envisioned such a shift when they decided to begin swapping paper textbooks for iPads in the 2012-13 school year.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2016/06/17/the-district-where-oer-meets-ipads/

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Worldwide Smartphone Sales to Grow at Slower Pace in 2016

June 23rd, 2016

By Richard Chang, THE Journal

Global smartphone sales will continue to grow, but not in the double digits anymore, according to market research firm Gartner. Smartphone sales are expected to grow 7 percent worldwide in 2016 and reach 1.5 billion units. That is significantly down from 14.4 percent growth in 2015, but it’s still substantial growth, equating to a new smartphone for one out of every five human beings on the Earth. In 2010, smartphone sales hit their highest growth, at 73 percent, Gartner said. In 2020, smartphone sales are on pace to total 1.9 billion units. “The smartphone market will no longer grow at the levels it has reached over the last seven years,” said Roberta Cozza, research director at Gartner, in a prepared statement.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/06/15/worldwide-smartphone-sales-to-grow-at-slower-pace-in-2016.aspx

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Colorado startup seeks to track online learning

June 23rd, 2016

by Caitlin Hendee, Colorado Business Journal

When Nicholas Garvin applied for a position at electric-car maker Tesla Motors in 2012, he felt there was really no good way to represent all the knowledge he had in the auto industry. ” We invented the Stackup tool to categorize and score everything you read online,” Garvin said. Stackup is a web application and smart browser extension that currently works with Google Chrome that can be used to track users’ engagement on any given website. Engagement is then scored to provide insight into the time people spend learning on the web. The app is currently gaining steam in the education industry. Several teachers in both the Aurora Public Schools and Denver Public Schools are using it in their classrooms to create assignments asking students to spend time learning on the web.

http://www.bizjournals.com/denver/blog/broadway_17th/2016/06/colorado-startup-seeks-to-create-a-credit-score.html

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