Pacific High School Speaks on How Emerging Tech Could Impact Students in 2015

February 1st, 2015

by Globe Newswire

According to Pacific High School the most significant way to transfer education is MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses). It is considered as the best practice for online students to succeed. With the right infrastructure and the right software system MOOCs can deliver education. These courses allow better understanding of information, basically permitting students to learn from anywhere at any time. In the year 2015 educational institutions can take advantage of these courses and make it more accessible with cloud-based innovation, adaptive education, information capture, analytics to support educational institutions in coordinating MOOCs and different sorts of instructive technologies into the learning environment.

http://globenewswire.com/news-release/2015/01/25/699702/10116878/en/Pacific-High-School-Speaks-on-How-Emerging-Tech-Could-Impact-Students-in-2015.html

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High school classes increasingly blend in technology

February 1st, 2015

By MATTHEW SANTONI, Associated Press

As homeroom ended Thursday morning, students in Shaler Area High School’s Academy program sat down for math lessons at their laptop computers, watching video lectures or taking quizzes for one of four or five math courses. Teacher Nicole Kutzner watched on her laptop as sophomore Logan Pegher took a geometry quiz, seeing which questions took more time and stepping over to help. “If I need help, she helps us,” said ninth-grader Charlotte Zimmerman of Shaler, who was watching a video lecture at the desk next to Logan. “It helps a lot. Last year, I failed, and this year I’m getting mostly ‘B’s and ‘A’s.” The Academy, which blends one-on-one instruction with online lessons tailored to each student, is helping the district with students who otherwise would be at risk of dropping out of a regular class.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/jan/25/high-school-classes-increasingly-blend-in-technolo/

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New app developed identifying when students skip class

February 1st, 2015

By Andrew Marshall, Vidette Online

A new phone application called Class 120 focuses on the problem of class attendance by letting parents or administrators know when students are skipping class. This application is developed by a new startup company Core Principle. “Our purpose is to promote and support student success in college,” CEO and Founder of Core Principle Jeff Whorley said. Studies show class attendance is the number one contributor to good grades in college courses, but is also a problem nationwide. According to National Student Clearinghouse, the total cost of unattended classes by college students nationwide is $31 billion in tuition alone. The application uses the student’s smartphone to monitor if they are in the class at the given time with geolocation technology.

http://www.videtteonline.com/index.php/2015/01/25/new-app-developed-identifying-when-students-skip-class/

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Learning Device of the Future

January 31st, 2015

By Dian Schaffhauser, THE Journal

We asked a young innovator, a futurist and the CEO of the One-to-One Institute to imagine what students will be using for learning one day. Here are their predictions, from the fantastical to the practical.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/01/05/what-will-the-learning-device-of-the-future-look-like.aspx

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7 Best Practices for Building a Multimodal Online Elementary Curriculum

January 31st, 2015

by THE Journal

With many states requiring students to complete one or more online courses to be eligible for high school graduation, virtual schooling has taken off in K-12 education. According to iNACOL’s Fast Facts About Online Learning, in 2013, 29 states and Washington, DC, offered their students full-time online school options. However, almost 75 percent of the 1,816,400 enrollments were at the high school level and focused on course recovery. There were far fewer student enrollments in grades 6-8, and even fewer still in grades K-5. There are several reasons for such low enrollment at the lower grade levels: 1) Not as many full-time virtual programs exist for these age groups; 2) parents or learning guides must commit to facilitating daily student learning; and 3) standards-aligned, interactive, engaging curriculum is difficult — if not impossible — to find.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/01/21/7-best-practices-for-building-a-multimodal-online-elementary-curriculum.aspx

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More NH high schoolers take college courses

January 31st, 2015

By James Niedzinski, Eagle Tribune

An increasing number of Granite State high school students are looking to save some money and get ahead at the same time. Through dual enrollment classes, high school students can take college level courses, receiving college and high school credit. The statewide Running Start program launched in 1999 through the Community College System of New Hampshire, seven community colleges in the state and their education centers. Through Running Start, high school students pay about $150 a course to earn college credit before graduating high school. In addition, Southern New Hampshire University has its own dual enrollment program, “SNHU in the High School.” Courses cost high school students $100 each.

http://www.eagletribune.com/news/new_hampshire/more-nh-high-schoolers-take-college-courses/article_a2371c16-48e7-55a0-9430-6f0e3ca92939.html

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Edudemic’s Guide to the Flipped Classroom for 2014

January 30th, 2015

By Edudemic

For the past few years, Edudemic has covered the rise of the flipped classroom and its subsequent evolution. Each year, we find that more teachers are testing this new learning strategy and creating new ways to improve current methods. While some teachers are trying it out for the first time this fall, others who used the flipped classroom method in 2013 are making changes to build on their lesson plans for the 2014-15 school year. Read this brief guide to learn why flipped learning is an increasingly popular choice, and review a few steps for teachers wanting to try it out.

http://www.edudemic.com/edudemics-guide-to-the-flipped-classroom-for-2014/

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Meet Pecha Kucha, the Japanese presentations changing everything about PowerPoint

January 30th, 2015

By Ivy Nelson. eSchool News

As I prepare for my presentation this week at the Florida Educational Technology Conference (FETC) on “Presenting with Pecha Kucha,” my colleagues have repeatedly asked me, “What is Pecha Kucha?” The short answer is it’s a great presentation style that gets students thinking and learning, not reading slides. A longer one might be to explain that the term comes from the Japanese words for “chit chat,” so as you might guess this unique presentational style embraces a more conversational tone. But more importantly, it is transforming presentations as we know them.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/01/22/pechakucha-powerpoint-359/

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5 keys to a successful STEM program at your school

January 30th, 2015

By Todd Tyner, eSchool News

Interested in making the jump to STEM learning at your school? Mine was too. As an elementary math magnet school for nearly two decades, Mound School was looking for a way to further incorporate science into the curriculum. After receiving a federal grant from the Magnet Schools Assistance Program, we altered our approach and sought to transition to a STEM curriculum. Now in our first full year of implementation, we have a few suggestions to help other schools replicate our success.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/01/23/stem-keys-939/

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Data shows widening gap in higher-ed technology adoption

January 29th, 2015

by EDUCAUSE

Research from higher education technology association EDUCAUSE shows that in 2015, colleges and universities will need to evolve to address very real challenges of IT security, cost, and productivity, as well as providing user support for the “new normal” that covers mobile, cloud, online education, and BYOD environments. “The pace of change for higher education information technology is increasing–not slowing–and on many fronts. Trends that have previously dominated thought leadership and motivated early adopters are now cascading into the mainstream,” said Susan Grajek, vice president of data, research, and analytics at EDUCAUSE.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/data-gap-technology-023/

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edX: Programming language Scratch isn’t just for kids anymore

January 29th, 2015

by Barb Darrow, GigaOm

Scratch is a programming language built to help children learn basic programming skills. But now edX, the MOOC (for Massive Open Online Course) backed by top colleges including MIT, Harvard and Caltech, will offer a free Scratch course for anyone “regardless of age or digital skill.” Registration is open now for Programming in Scratch” which kicks off February 2. The course will be taught by Colleen Lewis, professor of computer science at Harvey Mudd College, a tech powerhouse and another edX partner school.

https://gigaom.com/2015/01/23/edx-says-scratch-isnt-just-for-kids-anymore/

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How Apple wants to remake the classroom

January 29th, 2015

By Nick Heath, Tech Republic

Apple has more than one million apps, more than two million books, almost one million media files available through its services, according to Couch, as well as more than 10,000 public courses through its online learning repository iTunes U – with Apple breaking down some of that content into categories and educational level to make it easier to browse. Increasingly teachers and students will turn to personalised learning services such as eSpark he said, where the students and teachers can choose the lessons that best suits the student, moving away from one size fits all education. “Going forward technology will really empower teachers to meet the need of each individual student.”

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/how-apple-wants-to-remake-the-classroom/

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EdX CEO Lays Out Disruptive Vision For Higher Ed

January 28th, 2015

by WBUR Here and Now

Anant Agarwal, CEO of edX, says “I talk about unbundling in time, function and content. Let’s take unbundling in content. Why should it be the case that a professor who teaches a course writes a textbook, teaches a course, writes the exams, the whole thing. Instead, a blended course is an unbundled course, where you might use a MOOC from a professor from another university as a new age textbook. That would be unbundling of content. So we do some of that. Why can’t we increase that? Today, why is it that every student has to learn in college when they are 18? Why four years? How about unbundling time? …. So a continuous education system like this could solve many problems. It will allow people to get just-in-time education on topics that are on the cutting edge of technology and learn as they need to learn; they may be better able to pay later.”

http://hereandnow.wbur.org/2015/01/22/edx-moocs-anant-agarwal

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IDAHO’S PATCHWORK WEB OF ONLINE LEARNING

January 28th, 2015

by KEVIN RICHERT, Idaho Education News

Repeatedly — both before and after his election to a third term — Gov. Butch Otter’s praise for Idaho’s high school broadband system has focused on access. The Idaho Education Network brings more classes into rural schools, he says, bringing the state that much closer to meeting its constitutional mandate to provide a uniform system of free public schools. The state’s own numbers tell a very different story:

http://www.idahoednews.org/news/idahos-patchwork-web-of-online-learning/#.VMFse1w_28p

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Higher ed jobs changing with technology, students

January 28th, 2015

By Joan Axelrod-Contrada, Boston Globe

Over the next 10 years, jobs for college and university administrators are expected to grow 15 percent nationally compared with 11 percent for all jobs, according to the US Labor Department. The median pay is about $86,000 a year. The growth in higher education employment. A 2013 survey found that 7.1 million students — about one-third of all students — took at least one online course, up from 6.7 million in 2012. College and university officials say many skills from other industries are transferable to higher education, although they might have to be bolstered with a degree or certificate.

http://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2015/01/23/higher-jobs-changing-with-technology-students/PO956UVR6xI3dKwjMZyMLJ/story.html

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UGA students take flight in drones class

January 27th, 2015

By RAYLEIGH ROZIER, Online Athens

The lawn outside the University of Georgia’s journalism school recently was filled with buzzing as students tried their hand at flying drones for the first time. The students are now in the third week of “Drones, Drones, Drones” a new course this semester dedicated to analyzing the airborne technology. The course is being offered through the New Media Institute, a certificate program at UGA that teaches students about emerging technologies and prepares them to use new media in their careers. According to the syllabus, the class aims to “explore the appropriate and effective use of drones, chart the regulation and proposed legislation of drones, and learn how to operate drones.” Students are also responsible for collaborating on a paper detailing both the benefits and the challenges of drone use.

http://onlineathens.com/uga/2015-01-21/uga-students-take-flight-drones-class

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How to (Really) Get Girls Into Coding

January 27th, 2015

by Lydia Loizides, Shelly Palmer

If we really want to get girls to code, then show them that everyone can code. We need to find creative, engaging ways to get girls to understand that Ruby is more than a gemstone, that Java isn’t coffee and that Python is not something to run from. Coding is not only for nerds and geeks or “super-smart people”; coding is for artists, musicians, politicians, athletes and movie stars. Coding is for everyone.

http://www.shellypalmer.com/fwb/2015/1/21/how-to-really-get-girls-into-coding

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“What happens when you type google.com into your browser and press enter?”

January 27th, 2015

by Git Hub

This repository is an attempt to answer the age old interview question “What happens when you type google.com into your browser’s address box and press enter?” Except instead of the usual story, we’re going to try to answer this question in as much detail as possible. No skipping out on anything. This is a collaborative process, so dig in and try to help out! There’s tons of details missing, just waiting for you to add them! So send us a pull request, please! This is all licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Zero license.

https://github.com/alex/what-happens-when#the-enter-key-bottoms-out

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Khan Academy Releases All Classes for iPad

January 26th, 2015

by Michael Foster, Khan Academy

For the first time ever, Khan Academy has released all of its classes specifically for the iPad. Khan Academy has positioned itself as a stopgap for people who are being failed by their education system. While the site is great for self-study, often it’s being used by students who are being let down by their teachers. When lessons are confusing, fail to cover the material adequately, or assume knowledge that students lack, they can go to Khan Academy and fill in the gaps that their education system has thrust on them. Further distribution and simplification will only help Khan Academy shore up the holes in otherwise lacking educational programs, which is why the iPad release is such a big deal. Additionally, the growing popularity of teaching by tablet around the world means that more teachers will likely resort to teaching lessons through Khan Academy instead of through costly and often lackluster textbooks. This will save schools money, it will make the education process more efficient, and it will likely make more students learn to love learning.

http://www.allvoices.com/article/100003270

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Top Apps to Enhance Your Online Learning Experience

January 26th, 2015

By Viktor, Epoch Times

The academic world is becoming increasingly high-tech, with many programs offered completely online. It follows that plugged-in students would want to make use of technology to make the most of their online studies. Try downloading the following apps to communicate with your fellow students at a distance, stay organized, and absorb more from your readings.

http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/1208343-top-apps-to-enhance-your-online-learning-experience/

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Satellite Internet: meet the hip new investment for Richard Branson, Elon Musk

January 26th, 2015

by Megan Geuss, Ars Technica

The two moguls are backing competing networks to bring Internet to the underserved. It was an interesting week for ideas about the future of the Internet. On Wednesday, satellite industry notable Greg Wyler announced that his company OneWeb, which wants to build a micro-satellite network to bring Internet to all corners of the globe, secured investments from Richard Branson’s Virgin Group and Qualcomm. Then in a separate announcement on Friday, Elon Musk said that he would also be devoting his new Seattle office to creating “advanced micro-satellites” to deliver Internet.

http://arstechnica.com/business/2015/01/satellite-internet-meet-the-hip-new-investment-for-richard-branson-elon-musk/

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