Succession planning for online courses

May 28th, 2015

By Tara García Mathewson, Education Dive

When faculty create online courses but pass them off to other instructors to teach, emotions can run high. The Chronicle of Higher Education reports a University of Texas at Austin associate professor of classics took to her blog to complain when her chosen successor for a course she created did not get selected for the job and she only found out in passing. Because online courses are labor-intensive to create, colleges and universities are increasingly having to navigate the tricky hand-off between instructors so that courses can run longer than their initial creators teach them.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/succession-planning-for-online-courses/399532/

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(Higher) Learning to Confidently Embrace the Cloud

May 28th, 2015

by Steve Hall, EDUCAUSE Review

Moving some IT applications to the public cloud can benefit even small colleges, providing economies of scale not otherwise possible. The collaborative nature of the cloud means that academic institutions are highly susceptible to data loss — a vulnerability that makes data backup vital. IT looks for partners to help continuously improve business processes, adopt best practices, and help with professional development of the staff using the service.

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/higher-learning-confidently-embrace-cloud

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Penn State University Hacked

May 28th, 2015

By Jeff Goldman, eSecurity Planet

The College of Engineering’s computer network was disconnected from the Internet in response to the breach.Penn State University recently disconnected the computer network for the College of Engineering from the Internet in response to what it described as “two sophisticated cyberattacks conducted by so-called ‘advanced persistent threat’ actors.” “Contingency plans are in place to allow engineering faculty, staff and students to continue as much of their work as possible while significant steps are taken to upgrade affected computer hardware and fortify the network against future attacks,” the university said in a statement. “The outage is expected to last for several days, and the effects of the recovery will largely be limited to the College of Engineering.”

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/network-security/penn-state-university-hacked.html

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TwitterChat: Balancing the Urgency of Revenue Performance with Mission and Quality Online – May 27

May 27th, 2015

by Ray Schroeder, Josh Kim (Dartmouth / Inside Higher Ed), Katie Blot (Blackboard), Debbie Cavalier (Berklee)

Challenged by complex and shifting funding models, higher education faces a growing urgency to balance mission and product mix to keep things afloat as enrollments and state funding decline. Adding to this complexity is the growing tension in the marketplace in which the value/currency of traditional degrees are challenged by micro-credentials and the emergence of CBE. How can institutions address these crises? Join UPCEA for this timely TweetChat by using the hashtag #HigherEdAhead on social media as online education leaders share experiences and resources and respond to your questions. A live question and answer session will occur on May 27th from 2-3PM EST.  Is this your first Twitter Chat? – It’s free, it’s fun, it’s fast, it’s a fire hose of information!  Explained at the URL below:

http://upcea.edu/tweetchat

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Amazon Launches Free AWS Service for Educators and Students

May 27th, 2015

By David Ramel, THE Journal

Amazon Web Services has debuted AWS Educate, a free service for educators and students that aims to prepare IT pros and developers for the cloud workforce. With cloud computing changing the way businesses work and driving innovation in organizations of all kinds, AWS said there is a need for more workers conversant in cloud technologies. “AWS Educate empowers educators with training, tools, and technologies to help students develop the skills to design, deploy and operate applications on the AWS Cloud.”

http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/05/14/amazon-launches-free-aws-service-for-educators-and-students.aspx

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How (and Why) To Use Student Blogs

May 27th, 2015

By Kristen Hicks, Edudemic

Blogging has come a long way– once a strange new buzzword, it’s now an important tool for business, education, and personal development. Having a blog doesn’t just mean putting personal diary entries out on the web for the world to see – it can be a way to learn more about yourself and any subject you choose to explore. Blogging is one of the easiest ways to create something meaningful with mixed media. That makes it a perfect fit for the classroom.

http://www.edudemic.com/blog-setup-video/

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Alabama Schools Now Required to Offer Virtual Courses

May 26th, 2015

by D. Frank Smith, EdTech Magazine

Alabama is stepping up its virtual classroom presence with new legislation that mandates that public school systems offer more online instruction options. More than 30 states now offer fully online public schools, and Alabama was among the first states to offer online coursework. The Evergreen Education Group’s annual report, “Keeping Pace with K–12 Digital Learning,” says Alabama has 51,809 students enrolled in virtual courses, the third-highest online enrollment in the country. But state lawmakers are saying that’s not enough. A bill passed in April by the Alabama House of Representatives would expand the state’s virtual classroom options, requiring all public school systems “to establish a policy to offer some level of virtual school for high school students by the 2016-2017 academic year,” according to AL.com.

http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2015/05/alabama-schools-now-required-offer-virtual-courses

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Video Game Could Transform Middle School Students’ Online Learning

May 26th, 2015

by Infozine

The Department of Education recently awarded a group of researchers at the University of Missouri $2.7 million to support the development of an educational video game for middle school distance learners. Through playing the game, students will learn lessons about water systems and practice scientific argumentation. Teachers can monitor students’ progress and intervene during the game to support the individual needs of each student.

http://www.infozine.com/news/stories/op/storiesView/sid/61899/

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Jacksonville BOE adopts policies for online learning, early course credits

May 26th, 2015

By Laura Gaddy, Jacksonville News

The city school board approved a pair of policies Monday that will make it possible for students to take online classes off campus and to earn credits earlier than a traditional school schedule would allow. “It’s definitely a break from the norm,” Superintendent Jon Paul Campbell said. “We’re trying to get to a place where it’s more anyplace, anytime learning.” One of the two policies deals exclusively with online learning, and paves the way for educators in Jacksonville to develop their own web-based courses. The other policy establishes three options — one of which is online learning — students can use to earn high school credits ahead of schedule.

http://www.annistonstar.com/jacksonville_news/jacksonville-boe-adopts-policies-for-online-learning-early-course-credits/article_b2299b74-fdf3-11e4-9288-0fce4ec8d902.html

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TwitterChat: Balancing the Urgency of Revenue Performance with Mission and Quality Online – May 27

May 25th, 2015

by Ray Schroeder, Josh Kim (Dartmouth / Inside Higher Ed), Katie Blot (Blackboard), Debbie Cavalier (Berklee)

Challenged by complex and shifting funding models, higher education faces a growing urgency to balance mission and product mix to keep things afloat as enrollments and state funding decline. Adding to this complexity is the growing tension in the marketplace in which the value/currency of traditional degrees are challenged by micro-credentials and the emergence of CBE. How can institutions address these crises? Join UPCEA for this timely TweetChat by using the hashtag #HigherEdAhead on social media as online education leaders share experiences and resources and respond to your questions. A live question and answer session will occur on May 27th from 2-3PM EST. Is this your first Twitter Chat? – It’s free, it’s fun, it’s fast, it’s a fire hose of information!  Explained at the URL below:

http://upcea.edu/tweetchat

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Young Students Learn Better with Mix of Virtual and Real Worlds

May 25th, 2015

By Dian Schaffhauser, THE Journal

Young learners do up to five times better when instruction combines the real world with the virtual world. That’s the finding from Carnegie Mellon University, where researchers came up with a test to figure out how technology could best contribute to learning. “NoRILLA,” as the testing platform is called, is a mixed-reality set-up that bridges physical and virtual worlds. The system includes software and hardware components, including a computer depth camera (Microsoft’s Kinect for Windows) to provide personalized feedback while experimenting in the real world.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/05/11/young-students-learn-better-with-mix-of-virtual-and-real-worlds.aspx

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3 considerations for the device-agnostic class

May 25th, 2015

By Bridget McCrea, eCampus News

The open question on U.S. campuses is not if students are bringing their own devices or how to connect them to the institutional network, but rather: how do you support all these personal devices at the point of instruction, in the classroom? How can educators can effectively design lessons and utilize software in an environment where their students are using myriad different devices, computers, and operating systems? According to some educational experts, the best approach to supporting BYOD for instruction is the “device-agnostic” class. Device-agnostic tools are applications that work across multiple systems without requiring any special customizations; they are compatible with most (or all) operating systems and can be used on various tablets, smartphones, and laptops.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/device-agnostic-classroom-677/

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NASA 3D printing challenge tests creativity and design skills

May 24th, 2015

by eSchool News

A new 3D printing design contest from NASA is giving K-12 students the chance to design items that could ultimately be manufactured on the International Space Station. The program, called “Future Engineers,” challenges students to create a digital 3D model of a container for space. Astronauts need containers of all kinds,” according to the challenge’s website, “from advanced containers that can study fruit flies to simple containers that collect Mars rocks or store an astronaut’s food.” 3D printing gives astronauts the ability to fabricate necessities on the fly, even in space, opening up new opportunities for research and learning. The container could be intended for use on the International Space Station or for a different, even hypothetical, space mission.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/05/18/nasa-3d-challenge-470/

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Coding in the Classroom: 16 Top Resources

May 24th, 2015

By Joy Nelson, Edudemic

As cool as technology is, its intricacies and inner workings are sometimes intimidating, especially for young people who may be more interested in what technology can do for them rather than what they can do with technology. However, when students hurdle that obstacle and see the value of computer science — specifically coding — they gain a broadened perspective and the potential for a rewarding career in the tech field. The following resources will help you teach your students the basics of coding and will provide tips on how to keep kids interested as you go.

http://www.edudemic.com/coding-classroom-16-top-resources/

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Bangor Township Virtual School gives students online learning opportunities

May 24th, 2015

by Sam Easter, MLive

Julia Chase is enrolled in eight classes this semester through Bangor Township Schools. She takes algebra, English and U.S. history just like many of her fellow sophomores. Only Chase isn’t spending a single day in a traditional classroom. Rather, she’s one of 25 students enrolled in the Bangor Township Virtual School, an online learning option that sees students complete coursework in a non-traditional school environment. “You can work on it from here — that’s helpful,” Chase explained, sitting alongside a few friends and a laptop at the district’s administration building.

http://www.mlive.com/news/bay-city/index.ssf/2015/05/bangor_township_virtual_school.html

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For Teachers, Learning to Code Becomes Learning to Learn Again

May 23rd, 2015

by Gerard Dawson, Edutopia

I used tech tools all day with little knowledge of their workings. And, despite my interactions with Jane, I had a typical fixed-mindset explanation for this: “I’m an English teacher. My brain doesn’t work that way.” What I was really saying was, “I forgot how to be a beginner.” A year ago, though, I became a beginner, an apprentice, a struggling learner. I decided to learn how to code. Immediately, the experience became less about designing websites and more about experiencing the growth mindset, improving confidence with technology, and learning that failure is part of the process.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/learning-to-code-learning-to-learn-gerard-dawson

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Inquiry in the Classroom: 7 Simple Tools To Get You Started

May 23rd, 2015

By Pamela DeLoatch, Edudemic

We know certain characteristics can be encouraged, but not taught, like curiosity. But teachers who use an inquiry based approach can provide techniques that help students learn the questions to ask that may spark a natural interest. As students process this new way of approaching projects, they and their teachers have numerous technological tools to make work easier, so more time can be spent with creative thinking, research and discussions, instead of with project paperwork.

http://www.edudemic.com/inquiry-in-the-classroom/

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2015’s Top Education Technology Trends

May 23rd, 2015

By Kristen Hicks, Edudemic

Each year, the New Media Consortium and EDUCAUSE release the NMC Horizon Report, which looks at the technology most likely to shape education in the next five years. The 2015 report highlights a number of key changes that educators, those at the higher education level in particular, should be aware of.  A number of experts weighed in on the six technology trends that are making the biggest impact on education. If you read the report itself, you’ll see not only a description of what the trend is (which we’ve summarized below), but also a few examples of institutions or organizations that have already embraced it.

http://www.edudemic.com/education-trends-keep-tech-front-center/

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Video game could transform middle school students’ online learning

May 22nd, 2015

by Nathan Hurst, University of Missouri Columbia

With more middle school students learning online every year, experts have identified a growing need for high-quality educational approaches that take advantage of current technology. The Department of Education recently awarded a group of researchers at the University of Missouri $2.7 million to support the development of an educational video game for middle school distance learners. Through playing the game, students will learn lessons about water systems and practice scientific argumentation. Teachers can monitor students’ progress and intervene during the game to support the individual needs of each student.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-05/uom-vgc051415.php

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8 Must-Have Google Chrome Apps for Students

May 22nd, 2015

By Pamela DeLoatch, Edudemic

It’s not easy being a student. As classes, athletics, and extracurricular activities become more demanding, even the most conscientious students can have difficulty prioritizing and focusing on their work. Fortunately, for this technology savvy generation, there are a host of tools that can help students stay on top of their game. Google Chrome, the free web browser, offers applications (but if you don’t want the kids to laugh at you, be sure to call them apps), that function like software programs in the computer. With these apps, you and your students can get work done more quickly and easily. Although many apps are mostly for fun, others can be extremely effective in helping students stay organized and productive.

http://www.edudemic.com/8-must-have-google-chrome-apps-for-students/

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Intel grants $5M for computer science program

May 22nd, 2015

By Doug Oakley, The Oakland Tribune

McClymonds and Oakland Technical high schools in California will share a $5 million grant over five years to grow computer science and engineering programs, courtesy of tech giant Intel. With the Intel grant, the Oakland Unified School District this year has accepted about $28 million from organizations interested in sponsoring different programs this year including an $11 million grant from the Atlantic Philanthropies to develop pathways to careers in the health industry and a $5 million grant from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation for early learning. Intel will help the two schools develop curriculum, buy computers, train teachers and offer employee mentors and job shadowing programs. Officials hope it will produce 600 college ready graduates who will seek college degrees and careers in engineering and computer science.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/05/14/intel-computer-science-049/

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