An ‘unhackable’ system for securing campus data?

October 24th, 2014

By Dennis Pierce, eCampusNews

New Hampshire-based company EduLok promotes a two-pronged approach to safeguarding sensitive data, data-security. With data security breaches continuing to plague higher education, a New Hampshire company called EduLok is promoting what it calls an “unhackable” system for safeguarding sensitive information. EduLok’s new system, announced in August, reportedly takes a two-pronged approach to securing campus networks and data: (1) It fragments the information stored in campus databases and disperses it across multiple EduLok servers located around the world, and (2) it requires multifactor authentication for students and staff to retrieve this information. EduLok says its system eliminates the need for user names and passwords, which can be cumbersome to remember and easily hacked. Instead, students and staff would use a PassKey—either a USB token or a mobile app—and a Personal Identification Number to access the data.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/unhackable-campus-data-803/

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Easy steps to OER creation

October 24th, 2014

By Laura Devaney, Managing Editor,eSchool News

Creating and using OER isn’t as complicated as some educators might believe. Open educational resources (OER) offer educators a chance to align learning materials to students’ needs–and teachers can create their own OER through a surprisingly straightforward process, using materials they likely have in abundance in their classrooms. OER are commonly considered resources that are freely shared and able to be modified and redistributed. Educators can use OER in small bits to supplement textbooks or other learning resources, or they can use OER to replace traditional textbooks and revamp classroom instruction. This “grass-roots, bottom-up” approach to content creation enables educators to tailor content to meet students’ needs,” said Tyler DeWitt, a MIT Ph.D. student and a student coordinator for the new MIT+K12 video outreach project, during a Connected Educator Month edWeb webinar.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2014/10/16/easy-oer-creation-423/

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The 21 Best Resources for 2014 to Prevent Cyberbullying

October 24th, 2014

By Edudemic

According to the Cyberbullying Research Center, more than half of teens and adolescents have reported that they’ve been bullied online, and between 10 and 20 percent say it occurs regularly. As a slew of recent news stories have demonstrated, the consequences can be devastating. A recent study conducted by the Center found that 20% of respondents who had been bullied, “reported seriously thinking about attempting suicide.” Not all cases result in such poignant tragedy, of course, but cyberbullying has become a widespread problem that affects students of all ages and backgrounds. What’s worse is that many victims of cyberbullying don’t reach out for help, and they may continue to suffer from the consequences of bullying — such as low self-esteem and heightened levels of stress — for years after they’ve finished school.

http://www.edudemic.com/21-resources-to-prevent-cyberbullying-for-2014/

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How Should Educator Professional Development Change?

October 23rd, 2014

by Ben Johnson, Edutopia

Teachers in the United States have long known that there is a traditional “disconnect” between what teachers were expected to do and how the teachers were expected to learn how to do it. Teachers attend professional development sessions of all kinds, but unfailingly will acknowledge that the real development of teacher skills for most teachers in the U.S. is “on the job” or “learning by doing.” Job-imbedded professional development through teacher collaboration is becoming a more significant factor in more and more school systems worldwide. This is demonstrated in the report from the National Center for Teaching Quality (NCTQ) out of North Carolina published in May, 2014. This report shines more light on not only the American professional development perspectives, but also perspectives from teachers in Shanghai, Singapore, and Canada — nations that significantly outperform the U.S. on the Program for International Assessment (PISA).

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/how-should-professional-development-change-ben-johnson

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Using Multimedia Technology for Teaching Social and Life Skills

October 23rd, 2014

by Maurice Ellias, Edutopia

Take a good story, make it into an illustrated book, develop a curriculum, shoot videos of kids in action, add a website, create an app, ground it all in rigorous research and this may be the formula for the next wave of social and life-skills-related instruction.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/using-multimedia-technology-teaching-social-and-life-skills-maurice-elias

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Some Kentucky School Districts Can Now Use Online Courses as an Alternative on Snow Days

October 23rd, 2014

By DEVIN KATAYAMA, WFPL

Remember last winter, when schools around Kentucky closed because of the unusually harsh weather? The Kentucky Department of Education has now approved waivers for 13 school districts to teach through virtual or other means when school is canceled because of emergencies, like large snowfall. Last winter, Kentucky schools had a lot of snow days. Some areas were hit harder than others. But it prompted lawmakers to revise a law to say that any district could make up 10 days of missed school through nontraditional means as long as their plan to educate children has been approved by the state education commissioner. This will most likely include online learning.

http://wfpl.org/post/some-kentucky-school-districts-can-now-use-online-courses-alternative-snow-days

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Using Games to Promote Evidence-Based Learning

October 22nd, 2014

By Christopher Piehler, THE Journal

Ashlee CornettFor educators around the country, teaching to new Common Core or state standards has meant a lot of work. For one Florida librarian, it has also meant a lot of play. Ashlee Cornett (pictured), who teaches at Parkway Middle School in Osceola County, uses the game-show style platform Cranium CoRE to encourage her students not just to answer questions about what they have read, but also to discuss why their answer is correct. Cornett, who used Cranium CoRE at two previous schools before she came to Parkway, said that the online platform is “a nice break from the paper and pencil model, and the kids like it because they work in teams and they think they’re playing a game.”

http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/10/14/using-games-for-evidence-based-learning.aspx

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Real-Time Classroom Feedback Enhances Flipped Learning at Temple College

October 22nd, 2014

By Leila Meyer, Campus Technology

Terry Austin, an instructor of anatomy and physiology at Temple College in Texas teaches several online courses, as well as one face-to-face course that he describes as a hybrid between an online and traditional course. “It’s not 100 percent flipped, but a significant portion of the class is flipped,” he said. His students watch short lecture videos at home, and then they log on to Learning Catalytics to answer a few questions about the concept covered in the video lecture. When the students return to class the next day, they get together in small groups to discuss the same questions and submit group answers. “It makes for some really interesting discussions,” said Austin.

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2014/10/15/real-time-classroom-feedback-enhances-flipped-learning-at-temple-college.aspx

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Easy steps to OER creation

October 22nd, 2014

By Laura Devaney, Managing Editor, eSchool News

Creating and using OER isn’t as complicated as some educators might believe. OER-creationOpen educational resources (OER) offer educators a chance to align learning materials to students’ needs–and teachers can create their own OER through a surprisingly straightforward process, using materials they likely have in abundance in their classrooms. OER are commonly considered resources that are freely shared and able to be modified and redistributed. Educators can use OER in small bits to supplement textbooks or other learning resources, or they can use OER to replace traditional textbooks and revamp classroom instruction.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2014/10/16/easy-oer-creation-423/

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Ubiquitous Everything and Then Some

October 21st, 2014

by Mara Hancock, EDUCAUSE Review Online

The media is buzzing about the “Internet of Everything.” The term ubiquitous computing became old-school before it even became reality, replaced by the Internet of Everything (IoE), aka the Internet of Things (IoT). This new conceptual framework—which essentially refers to the interconnectivity of devices, data, and people to one another and to the Internet—offers a rapidly evolving foundation on which to conjecture about the impact this connected technology will have on the future of society, learning, and education. Since 2008, the number of physical items connected to the Internet has exceeded the number of people on earth.1 Sensors are embedded in the phones in our pockets and also in common consumer devices such as refrigerators and cars; in addition, stand-alone sensors can be placed throughout our environment and set to communicate to our phones, clothes, watches, or jewelry. Campuses are now dealing not only with bring your own device (BYOD) but also with bring your own sensor (BYOS)!

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/ubiquitous-everything-and-then-some

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From Gamification to Touch Interfaces: Designing for 21st Century Learners

October 21st, 2014

by Jeff D. Borden, EDUCAUSE Review Online

The proven efficacy of games in helping students learn has yet to fully surmount skeptical attitudes among educators, but the motivational aspects of games are enticing, as are the futuristic apps and cross-cultural connections that new devices make possible.  Anyone who has read Carol Dweck’s Mindset would tell you that learning via intrinsic motivation trumps external motivation — always. Well-constructed games seem to provide just that. And what about a safe place to fail? What is the penalty for failure in school? How many chances do students typically receive? How many faculty members still see failure as a “weeding out” of the weak or unmotivated? Games can offer many lessons for educators.

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/gamification-touch-interfaces-designing-21st-century-learners

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How will the Internet of Everything change education by 2018?

October 21st, 2014

By Cisco, ZD Net

As we all know, technology is evolving rapidly. It has, and will continue to, profoundly change our lives in the years to come. What kind of positive changes can we expect to see rising out of the Internet of Everything (IoE) by 2018? For example, IoE is changing the ways in which students with disabilities are able to learn. Technology is being put to use in schools in Australia, with sensors changing the ways students learn sign language. Elsewhere sensors are being used to improve learning for students with ADHD by monitoring brain activity and providing rewards for improved learning. This process perfectly captures how a connection between the four pillars of IoE – people, process, data and things – is already influencing. Though currently, physical attendance is the norm; by 2018 we could expect to see tuition taking place through any device, anywhere. Through IoE, the linear knowledge-sharing dialogue between teacher and student can evolve into something entirely within the student’s control. They will be able to learn at their own pace, focusing more on what they perceive as relevant to them. This, in turn, could lower the price of education with students customising a course of learning that is specific to their needs, paying only for what they want rather than a ‘one size fits all model’.

http://www.zdnet.com/how-will-the-internet-of-everything-change-education-by-2018-7000034585/

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Lawrence gets waiver for snow-day teaching

October 20th, 2014

by Mike James, The Independent

Lawrence is one of 13 Kentucky school districts granted waivers to allow the use of online or other non-traditional instructional formats when school is canceled because of weather or emergency. “Last winter’s harsh weather created a significant hardship for both teachers and students alike. Many of our districts were forced to close for several days or weeks at a time, which not only disrupted instruction, but also extended the school year for many,” said Education Commissioner Terry Holliday. “While we hope that this winter will not bring the same challenges, now students in the approved districts will be able to carry on with learning — even when inclement weather keeps them out of the classroom.” The waiver allows the district up to 10 days of such instruction, Superintendent Robbie Fletcher said. The days will count as regular attendance days and the district will not have to make them up.

http://www.dailyindependent.com/news/article_c71c13b4-5352-11e4-a864-2764aa585cad.html

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Report: New revelations about campus IT trends

October 20th, 2014

By Meris Stansbury, eCampus News

Survey provides a national snapshot of campus IT spending, cloud tech, and outlook for the future. Almost one in every five dollars spent on campus IT investments are made outside of centralized IT; in other words, almost $4 billion is spent in non-managed, non-measured, and redundant IT spending each year on campus technology. This is just one of many illuminating findings of a recent MeriTalk survey—sponsored by VMware and Carahsoft—of over 150 IT professionals at public and private institutions across the U.S.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/campus-it-trends-096/

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Study says college students addicted to technology

October 20th, 2014

by WCSC

Researchers surveyed more than 150 college students, and 60 percent of them said they are addicted to their cell phones and spend on average eight to 10 hours a day on it. Rachael Anderson is a licensed professional counselor and a coordinator of Augustana Student Counseling Services. “It’s not anything formal according to psychology,” Anderson said. “You can’t get diagnosed with a cell phone addiction, but I can kind of get what they are saying; which is that this is something that I need and I feel really lost without it.” In addition to looking up from your phone during the day, Anderson suggests keeping it off of your night stand. “Studies have consistently shown that (cell phones) will completely wreck your sleep patterns,” Anderson said. “So you really need to find a time where you put down the cell phone before you go to bed.”

http://www.live5news.com/story/26763562/study-says-college-students-addicted-to-technology

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8 Billion Mobile Devices by 2019, but Can Batteries and Chargers Keep Pace?

October 19th, 2014

by David Nagel, THE Journal

The installed base of mobile devices is expected to hit 8 billion worldwide by 2019, according to a new forecast. But can the technologies that power these devices keep pace with this growth? According to ABI Research, which produces market reports and forecasts for the technology sector, there are, at present, about 10 “untethered,” rechargeable (i.e., mobile) devices per house in “advanced markets.” And this figure is only going to increase. Despite that, both power storage and charging technologies aren’t keeping pace at all. “The opportunity is enormous…. The growth in wearables driven by the likes of Samsung and now Apple will increase this number further, along with the Internet of Things, and even electric cars.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/10/09/8-billion-mobile-devices-by-2019-but-can-batteries-and-chargers-keep-pace.aspx

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HP hopes its breakup will benefit higher ed

October 19th, 2014

by eCampus News

Ed-tech consultant Mitch Weisburgh of Academic Business Advisors said he likes the company’s move. “I think that this could bode really well for the two entities and also for schools and [colleges],” he said. “Printers and PCs are a commodity business. HP Inc. can concentrate on driving down costs and increasing value, which should result in lower-cost devices.” At the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) conference in Atlanta in June, HP showed its new EliteBook line of devices, running Windows 8.1—including the EliteBook Revolve, a notebook computer that converts to a tablet, and the EliteBook 840, which reportedly features up to 33 hours of battery life thanks to an accessory battery stored under the device. HP has positioned these devices as more versatile options for schools looking for the convenience of a tablet combined with the productivity of a laptop.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/hp-breakup-ed-536/

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11 ed tech developments from Educause

October 19th, 2014

By Roger Riddell, Education Dive

With over 260 exhibitors on the floor at Educause 2014, there was plenty for attendees to see. Education Dive was on hand to take it all in, and while we didn’t see everything, there was plenty that caught our attention. From the latest LMS to publishing developments to lecture capture, and in no particular order, we put together the following list of things to note at this year’s event.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/11-ed-tech-developments-from-educause/318727/

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5 Ways to Use Integrated Google Drive Apps for Group Projects

October 18th, 2014

by Leah Levy, Edudemic

Google Drive empowers teachers as they use Google Docs to provide real time feedback. It also helps students engage in discourse via Google Moderator, and provides project participants a platform for brainstorming remotely on Google Hangouts. But Google Drive’s power doesn’t lie solely in its own features. In fact, it is Drive’s integration with third party apps that really empower student collaboration. In this post, we’ll explore 5 creative ways to use integrated apps for group projects.

http://edudemic.com/5-ways-use-integrated-google-drive-apps-group-projects/

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Learning about art via smartphone

October 18th, 2014

by Meg McConahey, Press Democrat

College students who are more comfortable browsing the web than stacks of books can now research the artworks on display in Santa Rosa Junior College’s Doyle Library simply by pointing their phones at them. The new Art Talk uses smart phone technology to make fine art accessible to a new generation of what writer Marc Prensky dubbed “digital natives,” students who never knew a world without home computers and the Internet. SRJC librarians Alicia Virtue and Loretta Esparza created the online gallery to better engage students with the library’s extensive collection of fine art, all done by current or former faculty members.

http://www.pressdemocrat.com/lifestyle/2919598-181/learning-about-art-via-smartphone

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Online learning program to be offered to elementary students

October 18th, 2014

by Julie Greene, Herald Mail Media

Washington County Public Schools is adopting an online adaptive learning program that could be available to all county elementary schools by the end of this month, according to a school system official. Students will be able to access it from home and at school, with the program providing data to teachers to help them determine which skills students need more help with, said Matt Semler, director of elementary education and student services. The Washington County Board of Education voted 6-0 on Tuesday to approve its consent agenda, which included the $231,000 purchase of Stride Academy for one year from LTS Education Systems, of Birmingham, Ala. Board member Melissa Williams was absent from the meeting.

http://www.heraldmailmedia.com/news/local/online-learning-program-to-be-offered-to-elementary-students/article_55f7f516-5f27-586a-b71f-0fecd8a56a0f.html

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