Educational Technology

February 19, 2019

AI is giving companies a fighting chance against cyberattacks

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

Venture Beat

The amount of information that we have to pour through in order to identify threats and vulnerabilities and ongoing attacks is growing non-linearly, says Fernando Maymi, Ph.D., CISSP, a security practitioner with over 25 years’ experience in the field for both government and private sector organizations in the US and abroad. Maymi first became a passionate cybersecurity advocate decades ago, when as part of a government project looking at creating the next generation of wearable computing devices for soldiers, he realized there was no way to prevent an adversary from intercepting any communications. The project was ultimately cancelled till it was entirely reimagined some time later to manage for the risk.

https://venturebeat.com/2019/02/08/ai-is-giving-companies-a-fighting-chance-against-cyberattacks-vb-live/

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New online resource brings science outreach to a broader audience

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Rockefeller University

After years of running on-campus workshops for New York City’s educational communities, the RockEDU Science Outreach team has accrued a rich portfolio of science education materials. With the launch of a new website, RockEDU Online, these resources are now available for learners, educators, and scientists everywhere. The site was created considering the challenges and limitations of participating in science education activities outside of traditional laboratory settings. RockEDU Online provides creative and well-designed resources that educators can incorporate to enhance their science education practice—including lab experiments, demonstrations, and discussion topics—as well as a Guide to Outreach where scientists can learn about effective tools and strategies for participating in science outreach.

https://www.rockefeller.edu/news/25138-new-online-resource-brings-science-outreach-to-a-broader-audience/

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Online app allows North Linn students to learn during snow days

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:29 am

by Shannon Moudy, CBS2 Iowa

“Good morning kindergarteners!” begins a video on Seesaw, an app Ms. Manos uses to communicate with parents and the students use to work remotely. “Another snow day!” This is how the 11-year teaching veteran keeps her young students learning, even when classes are cancelled. “I post all my videos and activities I want the students to do via Seesaw,” she says. The school began using the app last year, but this use, posting at-home lessons during snow days, was created out of necessity as frigid and sometimes dangerous weather has kept many Iowa students home.

 

https://cbs2iowa.com/news/local/online-app-allows-north-linn-students-to-learn-during-snow-days

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February 18, 2019

Will A.I. Put Lawyers Out Of Business?

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Neil Sahota, COGNITIVE WORLD

What is the law but a series of algorithms? Codified instructions proscribing dos and don’ts—ifs and thens. Sounds a lot like computer programming, right? The legal system, on the other hand, is not as straightforward as coding. Just consider the complicated state of justice today, whether it be problems stemming from backlogged courts, overburdened public defenders, and swathes of defendants disproportionately accused of crimes. So, can artificial intelligence help? Very much so. Law firms are already using AI to more efficiently perform due diligence, conduct research and bill hours. But some expect the impact of AI to be much more transformational. It’s predicted AI will eliminate most paralegal and legal research positions within the next decade.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/cognitiveworld/2019/02/09/will-a-i-put-lawyers-out-of-business/#2bc1715c31f0

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New Chief of California’s Virtual Community College Wants to Help Solve the State’s Work-Force Problem

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

By Terry Nguyen, Chronicle of Higher Ed
Heather Hiles will be the new chief executive of California’s fledgling virtual community college, the California Community Colleges system announced on Wednesday. The state’s ambitious first online community college hopes to test its first cohort of students in late 2019. The college, the brainchild of former Gov. Jerry Brown, seeks to reach nontraditional students left behind in the education system — those with some college but no four-year degree, or those who have never been to college at all. The virtual campus will serve primarily adult learners who want to take classes on their own schedules.

https://www.chronicle.com/article/New-Chief-of-California-s/245639

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Classroom technology should take a back seat to learning structure, experts say

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

Acquiring new classroom technology for students to explore isn’t as important as reforming the pedagogical structure they’re learning in — including a redefinition of success and accountability for students and teachers — according to 2019 policy priorities released last week by the the International Association for K-12 Online Learning, or iNACOL.For state officials and stakeholders, the priorities are more incremental and localized. iNACOL advocates for new standards of proficiency based on subject mastery, not “seat time” or how long a student spends on a subject; new accountability models and assessments; modernizing educator training; and enabling new education paths for students, like mastery-based diplomas and flexible credit transfers.

https://edscoop.com/classroom-technology-should-take-a-back-seat-to-learning-structure-experts-say/

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February 17, 2019

Did A Robot Write This? How AI Is Impacting Journalism

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Nicole Martin, Forbes

How do you know I am really a human writing this article and not a robot? Several major publications are picking up machine learning tools for content. So, what does artificial intelligence mean for the future of journalists? According to Matt Carlson, author of “The Robotic Reporter”, the algorithm converts data into narrative news text in real-time. Many of these being financially focused news stories since the data is calculated and released frequently. Which is why should be no surprise that Bloomberg news is one of the first adoptors of this automated content. Their program, Cyborg, churned out thousands of articles last year that took financial reports and turned them into news stories like a business reporter.  [ed note:  How will this apply to students writing research papers?]

https://www.forbes.com/sites/nicolemartin1/2019/02/08/did-a-robot-write-this-how-ai-is-impacting-journalism/#6c6fa7207795

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Transforming Big Data Processing Through Blockchain and AI

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Gerald Fenech, Forbes

After years of research at MIT, Endor claims to have invented the “Google for predictive analytics*”, providing automated AI predictions for companies. Endor can process Encrypted Data, without ever decrypting it, on and off blockchain and it enables business users to ask predictive questions and get automated accurate predictions. No data science expertise is required. Endor is a spinoff of MIT. The company started four years ago and commercialized Social Physics building a product that can connect to data sets and allow the owners of these data sets to ask questions about their data automatically and accurately without disclosing anything about the data or the questions.

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/geraldfenech/2019/02/03/transforming-big-data-processing-through-blockchain-and-ai/#907364350562

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Online learning advances at Marquette

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:29 am

Emma Tomsich, Marquette Wire

With the goal of educating a greater and more diverse student body, Marquette University is working to expand its online learning programs, David Schejbal, vice president and chief of digital learning, said.  Schejbal said enhancing the online learning program and creating more opportunities for students can allow Marquette to become more technologically and socially advanced. Schejbal was hired in August after administration showed interest in developing the program, he said. “One of President Lovell’s interests and goals of the university’s Beyond Boundaries plan is to engage more with the greater Milwaukee community,” Schejbal said. “Marquette is very interested in developing its online presence and expanding its scope to attract a more diverse student body, which would include adult and nontraditional students both in Milwaukee and throughout Wisconsin.”

https://marquettewire.org/4006107/news/online-learning-advances-at-marquette/

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February 16, 2019

Don’t Fear AI: 16 Ways To ‘Future-Proof’ Yourself As A Professional

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Forbes Coaches Council
Many companies are leveraging artificial intelligence and machine learning today, and the impact of these technologies is only expected to increase. While this is great for businesses looking to improve their performance, many employees worry that robots will take over their jobs within the next few years. While AI may certainly change certain types of jobs, they will never fully replace human workers—you just need to know how to maintain and sell your skills. Forbes Coaches Council members shared tips for “future proofing” yourself for an AI-driven working world.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2019/02/08/dont-fear-ai-16-ways-to-future-proof-yourself-as-a-professional/#5f2a02ae4cd3

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Are Digital Devices the Reason Why Kids Can’t Write?

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

Many parents who look at the messages sent back and forth in their children’s smart phones wonder if schools are even teaching writing these days. After all, the conversations seem to be full of acronyms and emojis, hardly the stuff that made Mark Twain or Louisa May Alcott great writers and less likely to help their children write at all.   The language that kids use for informal chatting and messaging in their digital devices is only one type of writing. Are these digital devices the reason why kids can’t write? If you’re thinking about handwriting, maybe. Cursive handwriting has advantages over typing and IMing, but we’re talking about writing instruction that fosters communication skills and develops critical thinking – and whether or not digital devices help or hinder writing instruction.

https://www.thetechedvocate.org/are-digital-devices-the-reason-why-kids-cant-write/

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The Purdue University Online Writing Lab and Chegg Partner to Make World-Class Writing Education Tools More Accessible

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

Purdue University

The Purdue University Online Writing Lab (OWL) and Chegg, Inc. (NYSE: CHGG), today announced an exclusive agreement to integrate Chegg’s Writing tools with Purdue University’s OWL content to support students on-demand whenever and wherever they need it. This partnership furthers both groups’ shared goal to help students worldwide become better writers. “This underscores the huge opportunity for traditional education institutions and technology innovators to work together to harness the power of subject matter expertise, premium content, intelligent software and the 24/7 access the internet provides,” said Nathan Schultz, President, Learning Services at Chegg.

https://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2019/Q1/the-purdue-university-online-writing-lab-and-chegg-partner-to-make-world-class-writing-education-tools-more-accessible.html

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February 15, 2019

Report: Colleges must offer digital credentials to stay relevant

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

By Natalie Schwartz , Education Dive
Colleges that offer online programs should grow their digital credential options in order to stay competitive, according to a new report from the International Council for Open and Distance Education (ICDE). Credentials are an increasingly popular option for learners, prompting traditional colleges and alternative education providers to increase their offerings to claim a stake in the growing market. Colleges that don’t follow suit could lose out to “nontraditional and tech-savvy organizations” that are dipping into “universities’ traditional spheres of influence,” ICDE warns. Traditional transcripts don’t adequately convey a student’s skills, whereas credentials indicate if an applicant has the required competencies for a job, the working group argues. Credentials will eventually make transcripts irrelevant, they predict, and better align learning outcomes with workplace needs.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/report-colleges-must-offer-digital-credentials-to-stay-relevant/547858/

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University School of Milwaukee has used virtual learning days for years. Now other districts looking into it, too.

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:34 am

Alec Johnson, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
The snowy and cold weather events have school districts scrambling to figure out how to make up for lost time. That usually means either adding days onto the end of the year or making designated days off school days. But other options are also being considered, especially the concept of virtual learning days. At University School of Milwaukee in River Hills, virtual learning has been a reality for almost five years. The idea came about after weather-related school closings in the 2013-14 school year caused USM to extend its winter break by three days. Teachers and administrators wanted a way to continue teaching and keeping students engaged during unplanned off days.

https://www.jsonline.com/story/communities/northshore/news/river-hills/2019/02/06/wisconsin-schools-consider-replacing-snow-days-virtual-learning/2768021002/

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Midwest instructors move classes online during polar vortex

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

Natalie Schwartz, Education Dive

When a polar vortex swept through the Midwest last week and triggered wind chills as low as 66 degrees below zero, University of Michigan professor Perry Samson thought it was too good of a teaching opportunity to pass up. Samson, an atmospheric sciences professor, teaches a course called “extreme weather.” In it, he covers topics such as hurricanes, tornadoes and lightning, as well as how a changing climate can alter the frequency and intensity of such events. The week the polar vortex hit, he was scheduled to lecture about heat waves. Inaccurate student data can have major consequences for credit reporting for not only your organization, but also your students. Get up to speed on new standards and how to meet them with this playbook. Even if students were willing to chance frostbite in the record-breaking cold to get to his class, the university had made the rare call to close the campus. So instead, Samson took the class online. Other instructors at closed campuses across the Midwest kept their students on track through the deep freeze by bringing their classes online.

 

https://www.educationdive.com/news/midwest-instructors-move-classes-online-during-polar-vortex/547526/

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February 14, 2019

If taught well, online law school courses can pass the test, experts say

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:41 am

BY STEPHANIE FRANCIS WARD, ABA Journal

The skills for teaching online law school courses are not unlike those needed for the practice of law. Both require concise writing, well-organized outlines and the ability to speak without appearing that you’re reading from a script, says Ellen Murphy, assistant dean of instructional technologies and design at Wake Forest University School of Law. And despite the stereotypes about online offerings being low-quality, Murphy says that when the courses are done well, students and professors may have a better connection than they would with in-person classes. With online learning, she adds, “you can’t hide in the back row.”

http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/are-online-law-school-courses-good-that-depends-experts-say

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Emerging Technologies Need Diversity: Innovative Women in AI / Blockchain to Follow in 2019

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:39 am

Sandra Ponce de Leon, Forbes

Besides being a hot topic these days, emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence and blockchain have received a reputation for being especially male-dominated in an already bro-saturated tech world. However, the buzz around artificial intelligence and cryptography isn’t without merit, as these technologies are much more than just one more thing to be mansplained.  With such diverse and far-reaching applications, it is clear that a diversity of perspectives will be necessary to create effective and sustainable solutions. I interviewed some of the most innovative female voices in AI and blockchain to better understand their struggle to ensure that this technology benefits everyone.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/cognitiveworld/2019/02/03/emerging-technologies-need-diversity-innovative-women-in-ai-blockchain-to-follow-in-2019/#14fbd2e9d3ed

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Ironwood, The Last Open edX Version, To Be Released This February

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:29 am

By IBL News

Big news for Open edX’s developers: Ironwood, the 2019 version of this learning platform, will be released on February. The first release candidate, Ironwood.1rc1, was just made available this week. “Our goal is to release Ironwood in two weeks. In order to do that, I need to hear back from you about how testing is going,” Ned Batchelder, Software Architect at edX announced on Google Groups.

https://iblnews.org/2019/02/07/ironwood-the-last-open-edx-version-expected-to-be-released-this-february/

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February 13, 2019

7 discoveries from an active learning classroom

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

BY JULIE MARSHALL, eSchool News

There is a fair amount of research into the impact of classroom design on student learning. Spaces flooded with natural light that allow for a variety of learning methods and activities, and spaces that let students feel a sense of ownership over the classroom, demonstrably affect how well students learn.  Active learning applies a similar principle, including minimizing institutional barriers like teacher lecterns, fixed and stagnant furniture, and limited student exposure to real-world experiences. Through active learning, the teacher gradually releases control to the students, encouraging them to become independent learners.

 

https://www.eschoolnews.com/2019/01/30/7-discoveries-from-an-active-learning-classroom/

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Delivering Tech Enabled Learning Opportunities to Refugees

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am
Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate
It’s hard to imagine a more challenging teaching situation than the one facing those tasked with educating refugees. Usually, by the time a refugee child makes it to the United States, he or she has experienced unspeakable trauma, lengthy disruptions to daily life, and much uncertainty. The student is unlikely to know English or to be familiar with the American educational system and wider culture. This daunting task of providing the best possible education to refugee children can be met with the help of some edtech tools.

https://www.thetechedvocate.org/delivering-tech-enabled-learning-opportunities-to-refugees/

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THE WORLD’S FASTEST SUPERCOMPUTER BREAKS AN AI RECORD

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Tom Simonite, Wired

Oak Ridge National Lab’s Summit supercomputer became the world’s most powerful in 2018, reclaiming that title from China for the first time in five years. The record-setting project involved the world’s most powerful supercomputer, Summit, at Oak Ridge National Lab. The machine captured that crown in June last year, reclaiming the title for the US after five years of China topping the list. As part of a climate research project, the giant computer booted up a machine-learning experiment that ran faster than any before. Summit, which occupies an area equivalent to two tennis courts, used more than 27,000 powerful graphics processors in the project. It tapped their power to train deep-learning algorithms, the technology driving AI’s frontier, chewing through the exercise at a rate of a billion billion operations per second, a pace known in supercomputing circles as an exaflop. Fittingly, the world’s most powerful computer’s AI workout was focused on one of the world’s largest problems: climate change.

https://www.wired.com/story/worlds-fastest-supercomputer-breaks-ai-record/

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