Educational Technology

June 24, 2019

Google’s Growing IT Certificate

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:37 am

By Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed
To bolster expanding online IT certificate program, Google plans to add career resources for students and to expand its community college partnerships and pathways to four-year degrees. More than 8,000 people have completed the eight-month Google IT support certificate program since it launched in early 2018. The certificate, Google’s first substantial foray into postsecondary education, is offered through online learning platform Coursera. The tech giant’s aim is to create a pipeline of diverse applicants for entry-level IT jobs. Nearly 75,000 people have enrolled in the program, said Natalie Van Kleef Conley, a senior product manager for Grow With Google, an initiative that aims to expand access to Google’s training and tools.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2019/06/14/google-it-certificate-program-expands-more-community-colleges

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9 Skills and Certifications Employers Want

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Sarah Surette, Thrive Global

With ever-increasing competition from other job seekers, you need to stand out from the crowd to potential employers. So, what will give you the edge over other candidates? There are several skills and certifications that employers want more than others. Now that online learning has taken off, there are hundreds of different certifications you can get. They offer classes in any number of different skills and trades, and the consensus among HR professionals is that certifications can, indeed, make a difference, but not all of them. Take a look at these top skills and certifications that should place you ahead of your competitors.

https://thriveglobal.com/stories/9-skills-and-certifications-employers-want/

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What’s in a microcredential?

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

Wayne D’Orio, Education Dive

There are nearly 750,000 “unique credentials” on offer in the U.S. today, including micocredentials and certificates, said Scott Cheney, executive director of Credential Engine, a nonprofit that aims to implement a common schema for credentials and has developed a national registry to track them. Less than a degree and not a formal license, he said, microcredentials can be offered by a variety of organizations, from IBM to the National Wood Flooring Association, and delivered through a range of postsecondary institutions. Some of the most popular topics for microcredentials are in technology fields, where much of this activity started, as well as in so-called “soft” skills such as empathy and resilience, deLaski said.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/whats-in-a-microcredential/556606/

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June 23, 2019

A third of U.S. workers say they lack data skills

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:39 am

Katya Schwenk, EdScoop

Research by the online course provider edX reported on Tuesday that 39 percent of U.S. consumers they surveyed across industries feel they lack proficiency in data skills — though respondents also said they are reluctant to ask their employers for additional training. The survey, conducted by a 3rd-party data vendor, polled 1,000 adults, 917 of whom were or had previously been employed. Another 37 percent of the respondents said they lacked proficiency in soft skills like project management. And a quarter said they had been forced to seek outside help with technology they used at the workplace.

https://edscoop.com/a-third-of-u-s-workers-say-they-lack-data-skills/

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School-Issued Devices Are Spying on Your Children

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

The Chromebooks, iPADS, or other tech devices your child borrows from school each year are digital spies. They are intimately familiar with your child’s private information and browsing habits.  When most people think of digital surveillance, images of cameras come to mind. Digital surveillance is already in place at shopping malls, traffic lights and even classrooms where surveillance cameras monitor behavior. Surveillance is supposed to improve security and increase safety. School employees watch cameras in trouble spots like stairwells, halls, and common areas. Surveillance systems then store images in the cloud. If administrators need to determine who vandalized school property or engaged in a fight, the documentation is available. Some surveillance practices, however, violate the privacy of students.

https://www.thetechedvocate.org/school-issued-devices-are-spying-on-your-children/

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5 Ways to Create Greater Learner Retention

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

By Patty Gaul, ATD
Retention is defined as “the continued possession, use, or control of something”; “the fact of keeping something in one’s memory”; and “the action of absorbing and continuing to hold a substance.” But given the pace of change in business and competing demands for learners’ attention, how do facilitators help their participants retain what is shared in a training course? It’s about conscious creation, whether facilitating an e-learning or in-person course.

https://www.td.org/insights/5-ways-to-create-greater-learner-retention

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June 22, 2019

Intellectual Property and Digital Learning: Developing a campus strategy

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:42 am

Edward J. Maloney and Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

Who owns the content that is created for online and blended courses? The faculty? The institution? Both? Do you know the answer to this question for your school? Would your answer agree with the provost or general counsel? Another way to ask this question is to inquire if the intellectual property policies at your institution have kept up with the digital learning revolution. Back in the days before teaching and learning were digital affairs, the rules governing intellectual property were fairly simple. At most institutions, faculty members owned their IP. If a professor wrote a book or an article, she owned the IP for the book. (Unless she signed away the rights to a publisher or journal, but that’s a different story.) Professors also owned the IP for the lectures that they gave.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/blogs/technology-and-learning/intellectual-property-and-digital-learning

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Dublin City University announces a strategic partnership with FutureLearn

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

BY CONOR MCMAHON, Fora
DUBLIN CITY UNIVERSITY is rolling out a suite of online courses on topics such as blockchain and artificial intelligence as part of a strategic partnership with digital education provider FutureLearn. Jointly owned by the UK-based Open University and employment industry group SEEK, FutureLearn provides a range of online courses designed by universities and other institutions from around the world. Students and working professionals will be able to enroll in short-term and accredited DCU courses on a range of subjects like artificial intelligence, fintech, conflict resolution, blockchain and data analytics. The full range of courses will be available from the start of next year.

https://fora.ie/dcu-online-courses-professionals-4676983-Jun2019/

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Survey: 1 in 4 Students Say There’s Not Enough Technology in the Classroom

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

By Rhea Kelly, Campus Technology
In a recent survey, 23 percent of college students said classroom technology use at their school is insufficient. And 60 percent said that having more classroom technology would improve their learning experience. The survey, conducted by Barnes & Noble College, polled more than 500 undergraduate and graduate students at the company’s partner schools. Survey questions focused on students’ classroom experience as well as their views on testing and instructional feedback.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2019/06/11/survey-1-in-4-students-say-theres-not-enough-technology-in-the-classroom.aspx

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June 21, 2019

Why You Should Use Live Streaming in Your Classroom Right Away

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

Live streaming may be one of the more effective ways to engage your students in the learning process. The concept of live streaming has generated immense popularity on social media platforms. If you’ve recorded or watched a live vlog, then already you’ve been part of live streaming. Maybe you’ve engaged with live streaming by marking your emotional response with a thumbs-up or a heart, and you may have even made comments in the feed. Your student should have similar experiences with your classroom content.

https://www.thetechedvocate.org/why-you-should-use-live-streaming-in-your-classroom-right-away/

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The Adaptive Learning Market Shakes Out

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Bob Ubell, Inside Higher Ed

In a recent rush, more than half a dozen adaptive learning companies have been scooped up like M&Ms at a candy counter. One of the most notable is Knewton, whose assets were acquired by Wiley just weeks ago. Last year, Carnegie Learning, Acrobatiq, Knowre and Fishtree were also swallowed in acquisition fever. Meanwhile, ACT, the nonprofit college admission test company, earlier this year invested $7.5 million in Smart Sparrow. Ed-tech guru Phil Hill, the MindWires partner who is widely followed on his Phil on Ed Tech blog, told me in a telephone interview that most sales were made not from strength, but “from positions of weakness and need.”

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/views/2019/06/12/explaining-shakeout-adaptive-learning-market-opinion

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The End of the Line for iTunes U?

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed

Many critics weighed in earlier this month when tech giant Apple announced it was dismantling its iconic iTunes music platform and replacing it with separate apps for music, podcasts and video. In numerous articles reflecting on the legacy of iTunes, they remarked on how the software became bloated and suffered from poor user design. But they also acknowledged the pivotal role iTunes played in shaping the music industry by changing the way consumers bought and listened to music. Largely absent from the discussions, however, was the central role iTunes played in opening up higher education to the public.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2019/06/12/apple-winds-down-itunes-u

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June 20, 2019

Rewriting the Rule Book for College Accreditors

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:39 am

By Andrew Kreighbaum, Inside Higher Ed

Trump administration seeks overhaul of federal standards for college accreditors, arguing current rules stifle innovation. But critics say proposed changes water down oversight. Betsy DeVos issued a proposal Tuesday to loosen federal standards for college accreditors, arguing that the changes would spur innovation. The education secretary wants to allow colleges to expedite plans to outsource programs and to add new degree offerings or branch campuses without getting an accreditor’s approval. The changes also would make it easier for accreditors who don’t fully meet federal standards to retain their approval.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2019/06/12/trump-administration-issues-proposal-loosen-standards-college-accreditors

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Moving from textual thinking to visual thinking

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

BY TOM HAYMES, eCampus News
Instead of forcing visual thinkers into textual thinking, we need to see the world differently and develop critical thinking skills.  We need to start seeing the world in different ways if we hope to make effective use of the tools of the digital age. However, our educational institutions are still locked into profoundly text-based paradigms that have limited our capacity to use and teach visual and multidimensional problem-solving skills. I see the effects of this in my students and in my colleagues. Our industrial education model is designed to teach visual thinkers to think textually. It is baked deeply into the system and starts from an early age. It profoundly limits the way we perceive the world to artificially linear tracks.

https://www.ecampusnews.com/2019/06/05/moving-from-textual-thinking-to-visual-thinking/

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What happened to teaching digital etiquette?

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

By Fernando J. Figueroa, SM Daily Journal

There are only a few school districts in the Bay Area that effectively tackle digital citizenship and etiquette. Most school districts point at how they use Common Sense Media or Google Applied Digital Skills online courses as solutions. They even include them on their tech plans. Oftentimes there is no followup or almost no data as to how effective these initiatives are. In my experience, despite all of the tech hype that the companies in our region and communities claim, very little is explicitly taught in our schools about digital citizenship and etiquette. Students are often under the impression that these are topics only to be addressed in “computer class.” A policy of placing phones in bags sends the message that students cannot be trusted.

https://www.smdailyjournal.com/opinion/columnists/what-happened-to-teaching-digital-etiquette/article_8e9518cc-88c4-11e9-a0ef-afbf3b05361f.html

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June 19, 2019

Curated Reading List Professional, Continuing, Online Ed Passes 1,000,000 reads – Ray Schroeder

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

This is a more personal posting – my UPCEA curated reading list has just passed one million reads.  Since 2011, the blog has steadily grown in readership; more than 1,000 leaders in our field subscribe via email to get the daily updates of news, research, and trends that are most important to those leading professional, continuing and online education.  I invite you to visit the site and subscribe via email (free, no advertising, no spam) using the subscribe box in the upper right hand corner.  Know that you can search the 10,000 postings via keyword.

https://continuingedupdate.blogspot.com/

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How online learning helped local high school grads

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Tulsa World

Griffin Massey has known he wanted to be a dancer since he was six years old. After starting ballet when he was seven, this Tulsa-area EPIC Charter School student developed a singleness of purpose that led him all the way to being accepted to The Juilliard School in New York City, where he will start this fall. The EPIC senior is one of only 24 students to be accepted into Juilliard’s world-renowned dance program.

https://www.tulsaworld.com/sponsoredcontent/how-online-learning-helped-local-high-school-grads/article_cb626660-8923-11e9-84ff-2bca9c1838c8.html

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As Higher Education Evolves, Nontraditional Students Require Nontraditional IT

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

David Hutchins, EdTech Magazine

Consider that over the next six years, the number of people 35 and older who enroll in college will grow 20 percent, compared to 13 percent for the traditional 18- to 24-year-old set, according to a National Center for Education Statistics report. And today, across all age groups, roughly one-third of students are taking at least one distance education course, according to NCES data. This break with tradition is breaking IT. A prime example is legacy student information systems that were never designed to accommodate noncredit courses, distance learning, boot camps, self-paced study that doesn’t neatly fit into academic calendars and the increasingly diverse mix of private, public and institutional financial aid sources.

https://edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2019/06/higher-education-evolves-nontraditional-students-require-nontraditional-it-1

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June 18, 2019

New Illinois law allows schools to use online learning during emergency days

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:39 am

Rebecca Gangemella, WSPD 6

Illinois schools now have a backup plan to snow days and other emergency days out of the classroom. Public Act 101-0012 was a new law enacted Friday will allow teachers to utilize online classrooms when they cannot meet in person. A release from the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) said school districts found online learning helped curriculum move forward and students stay on track. This will also avoid adding on school days to the end of the year to make up for days classes were cancelled. However, the law still allows district to use two instructional days a year for parent/teacher conferences.

https://www.wpsdlocal6.com/2019/06/07/new-illinois-law-allows-schools-to-use-online-learning-during-emergency-days/

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From badges to performance reviews, here’s how colleges are reinventing the Work-Study job

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

By James Paterson, Education Dive

One idea comes from Chicago-based education technology firm Parker Dewey. Its online platform features a directory of short-term micro-internships that give students between five and 40 hours of paid experience in work such as content creation, candidate sourcing, market research and lead generation. “It is a win-win in several ways,” said Jeffrey Moss, Parker Dewey’s founder and CEO. “Companies test out a student interested in their firm and fill a need for handling a short-term project.” For colleges and universities, it promises better job placement and stronger employer relationships.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/from-badges-to-performance-reviews-heres-how-colleges-are-reinventing-the/556098/

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Using Artificial Intelligence to Close the Achievement Gap

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

Achievement gaps occur when one group of students (such as students grouped by race/ethnicity, gender) outperforms another group and the difference in average scores for the two groups is statistically significant. The achievement gap between students who come from different socio-economic backgrounds is a pervasive problem in education. Disparities in achievements between high and low socio-economic groups can be observed in children as young as 3 years and mostly stay with them for their lifetime. With the achievement gap established at a very early age, the resulting lack of achievement only decreases the likelihood of these children ever reaching the same levels of achievements as their more privileged peers. Well-designed AI solutions can help to resolve the achievement gaps that exist between various groups of students.

https://www.thetechedvocate.org/using-artificial-intelligence-to-close-the-achievement-gap/

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