8 tips for creating video in online learning

August 21st, 2014

By Meris Stansbury, eCampus News

To use or not to use faculty and admin created video in online learning has been a hot topic of debate in higher education, for many reasons. However, thanks to new research on video’s efficacy, best practices compiled over the last five years, and abundant technology resources, successfully creating and using video for online learning has never been easier to execute. According to a new report about instructor-generated video on student satisfaction in online classes, recently published in the MERLOT Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, instructor-generated video (when created through YouTube) can have a positive and moderate influence on student satisfaction with, and engagement in, online courses.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/video-online-learning-991/

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Education: Online course allows early childhhood teacher to keep learning

August 21st, 2014

by Kristie Kellahan, Sydney Morning Herald

Erin Foo, 24, is a student of Torrens University’s master of education (early childhood) program. She studies online and is building on her previous bachelor’s qualification. ‘‘The online nature of the course allows me to work and improve my qualifications simultaneously,’’ she says. ‘‘The small class sizes have allowed me to really connect with my peers and create a network of professionals that have a shared, common goal of revolutionising the early childhood industry.’’ Torrens’ online learning portal, LENS (Learn, Evolve, Network, Socialise), enables students to connect online with other education professionals in a simple and convenient way. ‘‘The connectedness between LENS, the modules, the online library and discussion boards provides an environment where I want to contribute to the learning and experiences of others,’’ Foo says.

http://www.smh.com.au/business/education-online-course-allows-early-childhhood-teacher-to-keep-learning-20140811-101yeb.html

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Online college courses making the grade

August 21st, 2014

by Paula Ann Mitchell, Daily Freeman

Not surprisingly, the number of colleges and universities offering online study, or distance learning, is growing. The website www.collegeatlas.org, in fact, reports that three-fourths of them now provide that option, leaving one to wonder what that might mean for the future of traditional “brick and mortar” university study. the State University of New York at New Paltz has watched its onlne programs grow. “Our summer online enrollments have averaged about 1,800-plus students and our winter enrollments are 300-plus,” said Philip Mauceri, provost and vice president for academic affairs at SUNY New Paltz. “The enrollments are mostly SUNY New Paltz students, but several non-matriculated students from other states have enrolled in select courses. Our students also have the opportunity of taking online courses from other SUNY schools through Open SUNY, easily transferring them into our college.”

http://www.dailyfreeman.com/general-news/20140816/online-college-courses-making-the-grade

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Remote Learning: The Lay of the Land

August 20th, 2014

By Andrew Binstock, Dr. Dobb’s

If I were obliged to choose industries that are susceptible to significant disruption in the next few years, I would have to point to education as being the most obvious and most important. In a generation and a half, education has gone from being an expense that most families bore manageably or with some difficulty to an extraordinary cost that can plunge students and their parents into deep, long-lasting debt. Rather than being the path of upward mobility that it was for generations, education has evolved into the principal barrier between the wealthy and the rest of us. Education costs have risen far faster than inflation and can be accommodated mostly by parents who begin saving towards the expense the day their child is born. The current model cannot continue along its present trajectory. It is ripe for disruption, particularly in the programming field where developers are always partially self-taught and demonstrated skill, rather than coursework completion, is the defining hiring criterion.

http://www.drdobbs.com/tools/remote-learning-the-lay-of-the-land/240168860

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‘It Takes Time’

August 20th, 2014

By Carl Straumsheim, Inside Higher Ed

The University of California System, after five years and millions of dollars spent, is asking for more time and money to get its systemwide online education initiative off the ground. The 10-campus university system began to seriously consider a centralized approach to online education in 2009, as California faced a multibillion-dollar deficit that led to budget cuts, layoffs and tuition hikes across the state. Online for-credit courses, administrators believed — and to some extent still believe — could alleviate some the system’s access issues and create a new source of tuition revenue. But five years later, California’s economy has rebounded, and the exigency to go online and do so quickly has diminished.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/08/13/changing-economy-changes-online-education-priorities-u-california

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Online Learning and Digital Books

August 20th, 2014

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

Tomorrow’s student may prefer mobile learning over stationary learning.

Tomorrow’s higher ed student may decide that paying for a traditional campus based residential experience makes about as much sense as paying for a new hardcover book.

Tomorrow’s student may find the lecture format as attractive as digital book enthusiasts finds the hardcover.

Are existing higher ed institutions (the incumbents) moving fast enough today to be ready for tomorrow’s learner?

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8 Myths About MOOCs

August 19th, 2014

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

This week Josh Kim is in Cambridge for a Hewlett Foundation sponsored invited participant workshop on Learning With MOOCs. The timing of the gathering coincides with Dartmouth, his institution, working on developing DartmouthX open online courses on the edX platform. Spending a couple of days immersed in all thing open online learning prompted this post of eight ways in which many misunderstand MOOCs.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/8-myths-about-moocs

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E-learning is the way to future – OAU (Nigeria) VC

August 19th, 2014

BY Sunday Oni On, Sun News

The Vice Chancellor, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Prof Bamitale Omole has described e-learning as the future of education, stressing that learning has left the traditional four walls of the university. He made the assertion recently in Lagos during the launch of the university’s e-learning platform by the institution’s Centre for Distance Learning (CDL). The platform, according to Prof Omole, would give the teeming Nigerian youths, as well as working class people, the opportunity to acquire university education, which has eluded many of them for so long due to space constraints in the universities.

http://sunnewsonline.com/new/?p=76568

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Distance Learning Meets Students’ Needs

August 19th, 2014

By Melissa Gute, Northwest Arkansas Online

Use of NorthWest Arkansas Community College’s distance learning program continues grow in a time when overall enrollment has been less than optimal, Kate Burkes, director of distance learning, told the college’s board of trustees Monday. Burkes gave an update about the school’s distance learning program at the board meeting Monday afternoon. “The growth in distance learning across the nation has been phenomenal the last 20, 25 years,” said Steve Gates, senior vice president for learning and provost. “NWACC’s story is no exception.” Distance learning has become a huge part of the college’s delivery system, he said. The program provides expanded access for students, Burkes said.

http://www.nwaonline.com/news/2014/aug/12/distance-learning-meets-students-needs-/

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Real-life business experience over the internet

August 18th, 2014

by Tim Dodd, Financial Review

A key feature of Intersective’s Practera platform was that it let ­students “engage with real companies and real company issues”, Professor Wailes said. “Students go on to the ­platform, they get involved in brainstorming and discussion, then they form teams and work through business plans,” he said. “It has the potential to allow us to bring real world experiential learning into the online domain. Our students get to learn by doing.” The two new initiatives are in pilot form and, if successful, will become a permanent part of the master of ­business and technology degree in 2015.

http://www.afr.com/p/national/education/real_life_business_experience_over_nhh0Ry4nDuYRl4VQODvIdL

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MIT to take its courses to the world

August 18th, 2014

by Tim Dodd, Financial Review

The Massachusetts Institute of ­Technology (MIT) is preparing to ­disrupt the prevailing global model of higher education with a massive ­expansion of its online courses which it would sell to other universities through licence agreements. A new internal report has also urged MIT to “engage in bold experiments” with its undergraduate program to ensure the university continues to be a world leader “at a time of ­disruptive change”. The report, titled Institute-wide Task Force on the Future of MIT ­Education , said MIT academic staff had identified 300 courses that would be suitable for transforming into online learning.

http://www.afr.com/p/national/education/mit_to_take_its_courses_to_the_world_gO2bKr0SuryYnXMQ3N0uIK

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UNM expands massive online courses after early success

August 18th, 2014

By Mike Bush, ABQ Journal

After a tentative, first step into the world of Massive Open Online Courses last semester, the University of New Mexico this fall is offering three MOOCs, which, even before they are set to begin, already have more enrollees than UNM’s entire student body. UNM’s first MOOC, last spring, was Professor Greg Heileman’s Web Application Architectures. Then – and now – it was described by the university as an experiment. It was also wildly popular, with more than 48,000 students enrolling from 192 countries around the world, about 10 times what Heileman had expected.

http://www.abqjournal.com/444094/news/unm-expands-massive-online-courses-after-early-success.html

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MIT Team Turns 6.9 Million Clicks Into Insights To Improve Online Education

August 17th, 2014

by Peter High, Forbes

Juho Kim is a Ph.D. candidate in the User Interface Design Group at MIT CSAIL. He designs interactive technologies for online education, with a focus on leveraging collective learner activities to enhance the video learning experience. His research introduces learnersourcing, a set of methods and tools that collect, process, and visualize large-scale learner activities. He is interested in applying established learning theories beyond small, in-person classrooms. As a result of these findings, he has been working with a team at MIT to develop a better learning platform. The result is LectureScape, which has the ambition of becoming the “YouTube for MOOCs.” I caught up with Kim to ask him about the vision for LectureScape, the needs it hopes to address, and how he anticipates it will grow.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/peterhigh/2014/08/11/mit-team-turns-6-9-million-clicks-into-insights-to-improve-online-education/

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A Cornucopia of Multidisciplinary Teaching

August 17th, 2014

by Vincent Mastro, Edutopia

Synergy is the primary force behind multidisciplinary or interdisciplinary learning. The benefits of the multidisciplinary teaching method are both significant and well documented. It is my belief that the power of multidisciplinary teaching is much more than just synergy. It is also about understanding how each discipline contributes to the whole. In other words, students will learn the capabilities, characteristics, and limitations of the individual disciplines when they understand how that discipline contributes to their newly learned knowledge of the subject. They will also begin to think holistically, and they will be able to deduce why it is important to learn a subject they would otherwise dislike.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/a-cornucopia-of-multidisciplinary-teaching-vincent-mastro

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Can Universities Use Data to Fix What Ails the Lecture?

August 17th, 2014

By Steve Kolowich, Inside Higher Ed

Colleges that are largely online, like the University of Phoenix and Southern New Hampshire University’s College of Online and Continuing Education, sit atop vast deposits of data describing students’ interactions with instructors, peers, readings, and quizzes. Those data can be mined for insights about teaching techniques that are not working and concepts that students are failing to grasp. They also can be used to design software that adapts on the fly to the needs of individual students, an approach that many advocates see as online education’s trump card against traditional instruction.

http://m.chronicle.com/article/Can-Universities-Use-Data-to/148307/

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Twitter enhances teacher education

August 16th, 2014

by La Trobe University, Australia

La Trobe University pre-service teachers are taking to Twitter to learn skills that will make them better teachers once they enter the classroom. Dr Narelle Lemon, Senior Lecturer in Teacher Education has researched ways for her Graduate Diploma of Education (Primary) students to explore and extend their knowledge of arts education through their use of social media. Over a three year period 550 La Trobe pre-service teachers logged into Twitter and created online galleries to share artwork and reflect on their learning. ‘As the group created the online galleries each individual was encouraged, through the maximum 140 character construction of a tweet, to carefully think about the content they could share associated to their learning experiences.’ This is a highly desirable skill in the environments they will work in when they enter the workforce.

http://www.latrobe.edu.au/news/articles/2014/release/twitter-enhances-teacher-education2

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10 Types of Learners You Can Run Into When Imparting Online Training

August 16th, 2014

Posted by Karla Gutierrez, Shift eLearning

The most challenging aspect of imparting effective online training is targeting the many learners taking the same program. Understanding the different types of learners, summed up in following categories, is beneficial to any designer looking to create personalized eLearning courses.

http://info.shiftelearning.com/blog/bid/352582/10-Types-of-Learners-You-Can-Run-Into-When-Imparting-Online-Training

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Portfolio Assessments Help Online Students Earn Credit

August 16th, 2014

by Devon Haynie, US News

Although portfolio requirements depend on the course students are trying to get credit for, students will typically need to compile evidence of their learning – anything from resumes to letters from supervisors – and then write a narrative discussing how their knowledge relates to the class, Tate says. A human resources professional, for example, might talk about how her ​ leadership courses related to those at a university or submit a copy of a handbook she​ designed. Faculty trained and chosen by CAEL then assess the portfolio. If they approve it, LearningCounts submits a credit recommendation transfer from to the program where the student hopes to get credit. The cost for submitting each additional portfolio –​ after the first one that is developed during the course – ​is $125. While that, on top of the course fee, may seem like a significant sum, it can actually allow students to save on education costs. ​

http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/articles/2014/08/08/portfolio-assessments-can-help-online-students-earn-credit

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Summer classes try digital tools

August 15th, 2014

by Katherine Nazemi, the Tech

While researchers were running experiments in MIT labs this summer, the Institute was conducting an educational experiment of its own, piloting for-credit summer classes through the “summer@future” initiative. Summer@future gives students increased flexibility in completing degree requirements and broadening interests, and by experimenting with digital learning tools. “It’s a chance to experiment with different ways of teaching, particularly more project-based, hands-on, more intensive ways of teaching,” Willcox said. “It’s also an opportunity to look at ways to infuse online learning and blended learning models into classes.” Proposals were solicited from professors early in 2014. Out of seven proposals received, five were accepted and offered as summer courses. Director of Digital Learning Sanjay E. Sarma and Claudia Urrea PhD ‘07 managed the program once the call for proposals had been sent.

http://tech.mit.edu/V134/N30/summer.html

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Urban Universities Embark on a Quest to Transform Higher Education

August 15th, 2014

by Tanya Roscorla, Center for Digital Ed

Personalized education is just one of the strategies that seven urban universities are planning to use as they map out how to improve student success as part of a Transformational Planning Grant project. Florida International University, California’s Fresno State, Georgia State University, Oregon’s Portland State University, Pennsylvania’s Temple University, The University of Akron in Ohio, and the University of Illinois at Chicago each received a $225,000 grant in a year-long project designed to transform higher education delivery. For this grant project, Portland State University is honing in on cost-saving flexible degrees for adult learners and clear pathways to success for community college students. The clear pathways will help students understand what classes they need to graduate and prevent excess course taking that doesn’t count toward their degree, Andrews said. Credentialing prior learning, and providing fully online and flipped classes will also save students time and money.

http://www.centerdigitaled.com/news/Urban-Universities-Embark-on-a-Quest-to-Transform-Higher-Education.html

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All Things in Modulation

August 15th, 2014

By Carl Straumsheim, Inside Higher Ed

Massive open online courses will return to the University of Wisconsin at Madison next year — or something that looks like them will, anyway. Having reviewed the results from its first round of MOOCs, the institution will offer new courses that are shorter, cover fewer topics and target Wisconsinites. It’s a concept known as modularity. Instead of reassembling a face-to-face course, lecture by lecture, institutions are urging faculty members creating online courses (and not just MOOCs) to split coursework into modules. For example, a 15-week course on Shakespeare could be transformed into modules on his poetry, comedies, tragedies and historical plays.

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/08/07/its-second-round-moocs-u-wisconsin-madison-embraces-modularity

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