Archive for August, 2010

Online Learning Framework for Teaching with Twitter

Tuesday, August 31st, 2010

By Mark Sample, ProfHacker, Chronicle of Higher Ed

Faculty are increasingly experimenting with social media, and it’s exciting to find more and more courses incorporating Twitter, a ProfHacker favorite. Just last week on ProfHacker Ryan provided an excellent introduction to Twitter, while earlier in the summer Brian reflected on his use of Twitter in the classroom during Spring 2010. As we gear up for the Fall 2010 semester, I wanted to revisit the idea of teaching with Twitter.

http://chronicle.com/blogPost/A-Framework-for-Teaching-with/26223/

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Online Learning: Practical Advice for Teaching with Twitter

Tuesday, August 31st, 2010

By Mark Sample, ProfHacker, Chronicle of Higher Ed

Last week I introduced a pedagogical framework for using Twitter in your teaching, organized along two axes: monologic to dialogic and passive to active. These high-falutin terms are fine for a theoretical matrix, but what about the real life implementation of Twitter in and outside of your classroom? How do you actually do it? I’m going to leave behind the pedagogy (mostly) in this post, and instead offer some practical advice for teaching with Twitter.

http://chronicle.com/blogPost/Practical-Advice-for-Teaching/26416/?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

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Using VoiceThread to Give Students an Online Learning Voice Outside the Classroom

Tuesday, August 31st, 2010

By Prof. Hacker Guest Shannon Polchow, Chronicle of Higher Ed

Just like most educators, I view teaching as a process. After incorporating a new activity or giving a new course, I reflect upon the outcomes. What went well? What failed? Sometimes I know the modifications I would make the next time around, but other times I look to my student evaluations for guidance. This recently happened after teaching an introductory Spanish class online. While I felt that the class had gone well, a student’s simple observation led me to my latest modification: find a way for students interact with one another in an online setting. The online forum I employed enabled me to speak in an asynchronous fashion with my students, but it did not allow them to communicate with one another, leaving them isolated, alone in cyberspace to work on their assignments with no personal interaction. The comment sent me knocking on my friendly technology consultant’s door, and together we found a simple solution: VoiceThread.

http://chronicle.com/blogPost/Using-VoiceThread-to-Give/26367/

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Ways that students can manage working full time and taking online learning classes

Monday, August 30th, 2010

by Bobby Coles, Helium

If you are working full time, and you are desperately attempting to better yourself from an educational perspective, taking online learning classes in your spare time is simple. The key to making the most out of any endeavours is to learn time management skills that are transferable in all aspects of your life. You do not have to sacrifice any hours of work, but you may have to figure out a way to still maintain that vibrant social life you desire.

http://www.helium.com/items/1926408-best-ways-and-tips-for-balancing-working-full-time-and-going-to-school-with-online-classes

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The good and bad of online learning

Monday, August 30th, 2010

By Stacey Kennelly, Chico News Review

Chico State’s Technology & Learning Program provides instructors with training, advice and a rubric for online instruction, said Ann Steckel, one of four instructional-design consultants at the center. She and her team created the rubric, which provides instructors with a checklist of things to consider when it comes to creating an engaging and effective course that will come alive to students. The rubric has been adopted by nearly 200 universities nationwide. Often, TLP consultants simply give instructors tools that allow them to think of their classes in a different way. For example, Steckel encouraged one art instructor to have students document pieces of art they encountered in real life with cell phones before uploading the images to the Internet, as opposed to having students find a piece of art online and write about it.

http://www.newsreview.com/chico/content?oid=1526396

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Which courses work best through online learning?

Monday, August 30th, 2010

By Creston News – ARA

Studies have shown that online learning is just as effective at teaching material as traditional classes. So any class has the potential to work well online if taught the right way. The quality of the class does not solely depend on the material being taught, it depends on the school, too.

http://www.crestonnewsadvertiser.com/articles/ara/2010/08/19/8047655066/index.xml

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Thinking of Taking Online Learning Classes? What to Know Before You Start

Sunday, August 29th, 2010

Fall classes are beginning soon for millions of online learners. Yet many of these students still have unanswered questions about how to excel in the online environment. Where can they go for help? Author and professor for six online universities, Dr. Diane Hamilton (http://drdianehamilton.com/), has taken her many years of online teaching experience and incorporated what she has learned into creating her new book, The Online Student’s User Manual. Recognizing that past books about online learning left out important information about how to be a successful student, Dr. Hamilton was inspired to create a book to fill in the gaps.

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2010/08/prweb3806784.htm

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Schools see benefits of online learning

Sunday, August 29th, 2010

By MARK MARONEY, Sun-Gazette

Muncy School District has developed online courses taught by certified staff members that are much cheaper than cyber school expenses, according to school officials. The administration recommended and the school board approved Monday night payment for a pre-approved online course. The course costs $1,500 for one to five students and $2,400 for six to 10 students. It serves two purposes, according to Dr. Kimberly A. Hamilton, director of curriculum, instruction and assessment. It is for students in need of credit recovery, but it also is being used for students who are “doubling up” on areas such as science and marine ecology.

http://www.sungazette.com/page/content.detail/id/547528.html?nav=5011

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Online learning benefits teachers, not just students

Sunday, August 29th, 2010

by Silicon Republic

While online learning is traditionally seen as an educational resource for students its can also benefit their teachers and directly impact on their professional development according to a report from US university Boston College. It was found that English and maths teachers who took on e-learning courses in professional development have improved both their teaching methods and their knowledge of the subject itself.

http://www.siliconrepublic.com/innovation/item/17398-e-learning-benefits/

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Why adults should go back to college

Saturday, August 28th, 2010

by Carrie Lynn Smith, Helium

Go to almost any job posting site on the internet and check out the ads. Most any ad for a job that pays more than $10 per hour will have very specific skills that they are looking for in an employee. They want you to know MS Office, Dreamweaver, Java, HTML, or QuickBooks. Or perhaps have “in-depth industry knowledge”. How does one obtain these much needed skills? College is the best way to accomplish these goals. With online learning, night and weekend courses, and other options for learning, college has become more accessible than ever to busy adults.

http://www.helium.com/items/1925684-adult-education-adult-students

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‘iGeneration’ seeks greater learning options online

Saturday, August 28th, 2010

by Brooke Blanck, the Kansan

The “iGeneration” has grown up submersed in the digital age — an age of mobility, flexibility and options.  This generation lives in a world where choice is abundant and content options are endless, and they demand opportunities that reach them in, and incorporate, their high-tech, high-touch world. The education sector must remain at the forefront of these trends to provide a dynamic learning environment, rich educational content and one-on-one support to students. With online learning, students have access to a wide range of unique core and elective courses, and they have the flexibility to learn in their own ways, taking more time on subjects they find more difficult, or advancing rapidly to more challenging material.

http://www.thekansan.com/newsnow/x297561118/-iGeneration-seeks-greater-education-options

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Online Learning: More university students taking advantage of cheaper community college courses

Saturday, August 28th, 2010

By Daniel de Vise, Washington Post

“The community college is part of the rhythm of four-year college attendance, more and more,” said Cliff Adelman, a senior associate with the Institute for Higher Education Policy. The growing role of two-year colleges is part of a broader trend. Three-fifths of those who earn bachelor’s degrees attend more than one college, and the percentage is slowly rising, according to federal data. In a mobile society with an abundance of classes available online, students increasingly view college as a collection of credits rather than a four-year term on one campus. These collegiate nomads, called “swirlers,” are becoming a major force in higher education.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/08/15/AR2010081502765.html?hpid=topnews

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Online learning classes may ease costs Students advised to check if course credits will transfer toward degrees

Friday, August 27th, 2010

by Katherine Borgerding, The Oklahoma Daily

Hannah Morris, a political science and public relations junior at OU, took an online class at Rose State College in addition to her course load at OU. Some OU students choose to take online classes at junior colleges, not to save money, but because they believe it will be easier. “Classes at junior colleges are less rigorous and more financially feasible,” Morris said. When a student enrolls in an online class at junior colleges Rose State College in Midwest City or Oklahoma City Community College, a fixed fee of $12 is added to the cost of tuition. This fee is added to cover the expenses the college takes on when offering classes taught in this manner. At Rose State, the cost per credit hour is $69, at OCCC it is $65. So, even with the $12 increase the cost of taking an online class is still fairly low. At OU however, in-state tuition is $117 per credit hour and out-of-state tuition is $236 per credit hour. This is the general cost of tuition at OU, and the fees can also be quite expensive.

http://www.oudaily.com/news/2010/aug/16/online-classes-may-ease-costs/

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As online learning classes grow in popularity, measuring their value evokes varied opinions

Friday, August 27th, 2010

by Dana Bartholomew, Los Angeles Daily News

Max Carrizo loved his online community college classes because his professors got to the point and never wandered off subject. Alina Hall took an online course and said she hated it because it lacked professorial support. Both recent graduates of Los Angeles Mission College represent a scholastic divide over the fastest growing segment of community college instruction: distance learning. “In an online class, I know what I have to read, and there aren’t any tangents, topics that have nothing to do with the subject,” said Carrizo, 23, of North Hills, who is transferring to California State University, Los Angeles, this fall with hopes of becoming a cop. “I’m trying to learn something.

http://www.dailynews.com/news/ci_15789491

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Economy, budget cuts send students to online learning

Friday, August 27th, 2010

by Tonya Moxley, The Roanoke Times

The popularity of online courses continues to grow at schools such as New River Community College. Some of the students enrolled this semester at New River Community College may never set foot on either of the school’s campuses — in Dublin or in Christiansburg at the New River Valley Mall. Like many community colleges across the state, NRCC has boosted its online course offerings again this year, giving students up to 130 distance learning courses from which to choose, said Linda Claussen, director of distance learning and off-campus services. Last fall, NRCC offered about 110 online courses, a trend that has exploded over the past five years. But today, entire degree programs, such as New River’s two-year administrative support technology degree, can be earned online, Claussen said.

http://www.roanoke.com/news/nrv/wb/257253

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Traditional Colleges Eye Online Learning Degrees

Thursday, August 26th, 2010

By Amanda Roberge, the Worcester Business Journal

The typical university classroom of 2010 has just gotten a makeover, and it may look familiar. In fact, it bears an uncanny resemblance to your home office, living room or local library. With online learning gaining popularity at a steady pace, earning a college degree is a reality to anyone who can log on from home. The virtual classroom is fast becoming a way for eager students to obtain an undergraduate degree, a master’s degree or even a doctorate, and local colleges are beginning to offer online-only degrees, in part to compete with online-only schools like the University of Phoenix. UMassOnline, which is based in Shrewsbury and oversees online programming at each of the University of Massachusetts’ five campuses, and Assumption College in Worcester, are two of the local pioneers in fully online degree programs.

http://www.wbjournal.com/news47071.html

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UF sets sights on the wider world market through online learning

Thursday, August 26th, 2010

By Nathan Crabbe, Ocala.com

The University of Florida is introducing nine new online degree programs during the next academic year, but that is just the start of a planned expansion that would double enrollment in UF’s distance-learning programs within five years. UF is considering proposals from companies to partner in the expansion effort, providing services such as marketing and student recruitment. The plan is to have 7,000 students enrolled in its distance-learning programs in five years, with enrollment growth around the world, said Andy McCollough, the associate provost for distance education.

http://www.ocala.com/article/20100815/ARTICLES/8151008/1001/NEWS01?Title=UF-sets-sights-on-the-wider-world-market

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UF, Santa Fe offer joint online learning degree programs

Thursday, August 26th, 2010

By Nathan Crabbe, Gainesville.com

The University of Florida’s distance-learning programs extend around the world, but they’re also being offered close to home. UF and Santa Fe College are offering joint online degree programs in business and sports management, with plans for three more programs in the next year. UF used stimulus money to pay for the creation of a facility on the Santa Fe campus – dubbed the “Gator den” – where students taking or planning to enter the programs can study and meet advisers. “These students are students at the University of Florida but they may or may not ever step foot on campus,” said interim Santa Fe Provost Ed Bonahue.

http://www.gainesville.com/article/20100815/ARTICLES/8151006/1002

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Will We Have the Best Courses via Online Learning in Five Years?

Wednesday, August 25th, 2010

By Paul E. Peterson, Education Next

Within 10 years, half of all high school courses will be taken online, say Clay Christensen and Michael Horn. Bill Gates has now trumped that prediction with an even stronger one: within five years the best higher education will be available on the internet. I will make a further prediction: Within five years Bill Gates will recommend that high school courses be taken online, something he has so far failed to forecast or encourage. Instead, Microsoft’s top executive drew a distinction between K-12 and higher education, encouraging online learning only for higher education, as if young adults at the age of 15 and 16 are drastically different from those at age 18 and 19.

http://educationnext.org/will-we-have-the-best-courses-online-in-five-years/

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ULM expands online learning program

Wednesday, August 25th, 2010

By Stephen Largen, the News Star

The University of Louisiana at Monroe is rapidly expanding its online course offerings to meet the needs of nontraditional students like Maggie K. Gras Stephens and her husband, Matthew Stephens. Each is pursuing a general business degree at ULM through the university’s online program. Maggie Stephens left ULM after a few semesters to take a full-time job as a legal assistant in Shreveport. Now, with about a year to go before she earns her bachelor of business administration, Stephens has her sights set on law school. “It’s really good for me living in Shreveport,” Stephens said of the ULM online degree program. “You do it on your own schedule, but it’s still very challenging because you have to work hard to keep up.”

http://www.thenewsstar.com/article/20100814/NEWS01/8140331

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Online learning classes vs. Board of Education

Wednesday, August 25th, 2010

by Meg Alexander, KFOR

A virtual charter school is being denied a district code by the State Department of Education. That has parents of the Epic Charter school angry and suing for an interpretation of the State Charter School Act. Attorney Brad Clark is representing the parents of the school, and says they were told their school did not meet requirements for an Oklahoma Charter School. He believes, legally, they have met the standards. He also says the school has a contract with the University of Central Oklahoma to sponsor the charter school. OCU says they are no longer involved in the school.

http://www.kfor.com/news/local/kfor-news-online-classes-board-of-edu-story,0,4484537.story

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