10 Awesome Online Courses for Only $15

September 25th, 2016

by Entrepreneur

What if we told you there was an awesome opportunity to invest in yourself, improve your knowledge, and take your skills to the next level … for only $15? We thought that might get your attention. Udemy offers thousands of online courses that movers, shakers, and entrepreneurs like you can enroll in to better themselves and their businesses. And the best part is that we’ve picked 10 of the highest-rated and most popular courses that you can enroll in for just $15. There’s something for every type of entrepreneur: writers can sharpen their pencils with journalist Shani Raja, business owners can build their personal brand with Gary Vaynerchuk, day traders can sweeten their stocks with Jeff Tompkins, and many more!

https://www.entrepreneur.com/slideshow/282517

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Higher ed leaders say industry is in trouble

September 25th, 2016

By Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

Inside Higher Ed reports on a survey of more than 200 college and university executives that will reveal a negative perception of higher education’s commitment to student outcomes, but largely positive perception of the work being done on their individual campuses. More than 60% of survey respondents indicated that their school has too many initiatives in place designed to address student outcomes, which leads to “initiative fatigue” and a lack of deliverables or results in this key area. Nearly half of the executives surveyed say that higher education at large is somewhat worse than it was 10 years ago.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/higher-ed-leaders-say-industry-is-in-trouble/426259/

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Pokemon Go craze hits classroom

September 25th, 2016

By Colleen Williamson, Parson Sun

Since its release in July, Pokemon Go has grown in popularity and criticism as the augmented reality game using global positioning systems and mobile devices has taken players outside their homes in their quests to capture and train virtual, fantasy creatures called Pokemon. The popularity of the game with youths is evident, which is what led Meadow View Grade School seventh- and eighth-grade math teacher Morgan Wacker to spending part of her summer working with her husband to develop a means of linking the game to math, school and home learning.

http://www.parsonssun.com/news/article_68663fae-7c93-11e6-b8a7-c7064c9d85f6.html

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Coding from college to high school

September 24th, 2016

by JANEE WILSON, Mat-Su Valley

It’s not often that a high school elective class can make students immediately employable. Jenny Barnes, John Notestine along with Colony High Teacher Brian Mead are bringing a surplus of job opportunities to students. It’s called CS50, and the plan is to have it be the most popular class in school. CS50 stands for Computer Science 50. It’s a MOOC, massive open online course, started at Harvard by Professor David Malan. At Harvard, the class became so popular and well-loved that Harvard decided to take it on the road, teaching coding to high school students. The high school version of CS50 takes the semester long university course and extends it over an entire school year

http://www.frontiersman.com/schools/coding-from-college-to-high-school/article_d802f69a-7aa9-11e6-a1ce-6bc2e26b16f9.html

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The Internet of Things, Machine Learning and In-Transit Visibility Revolutionizing Supply Chain

September 24th, 2016

BY SCOTT DULMAN, SDC Executive

There are new technologies and solutions—related to the Internet of Things (IoT)—that are creating opportunities for retailers to improve omnichannel operations, better manage inventories, reduce logistics costs, and retain and acquire customers. But the IoT—along with Big Data—offers a solution to unlock end-to-end supply chain visibility, giving retailers the ability to save costs through improved efficiency by better planning with analytics and machine learning. Chief among these benefits are increases in on-time deliveries, reductions in planning and scheduling costs, opportunities to decrease inventories, reduced transportation costs and improved cross-docking efficiency. Combined, these benefits enable a retailer to improve customer service, and increase revenue and margins.

http://www.sdcexec.com/article/12257563/the-internet-of-things-machine-learning-and-in-transit-visibility-revolutionizing-supply-chain

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Staying the course on a massive open online course

September 24th, 2016

by Science Daily

Massive open online courses (MOOCs) are popular with educational establishments as an efficient way to deliver their materials. Unfortunately, student engagement does not match the enthusiasm of the educators and the number who complete any given course is disturbingly low, according to research. The authors of the paper, suggest that an engagement model for MOOCs needs to be implemented and simple steps taken to improve completion rates.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160915120349.htm

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Open Educational Resources Adopted Slowly, Report Shows

September 23rd, 2016

by Education News

A recently-released report from Cengage Learning has examined open educational resources (OER) within higher education, including who makes use of the resources and why, as well as what the future holds for OER. The report, “Open Educational Resources (OER) and the Evolving Higher Education Landscape,” interviewed over 500 OER primary adopters, supplemental adopters, and non-adopters. Study results found that just 4% of higher education respondents use OER as primary materials. The majority of this use is within the topic of math with 13% and computing at 11%. Meanwhile, the lowest was found in English at 2% and psychology at 1%. In terms of supplemental material, OER is used by 5% of respondents overall. This includes 18% in computing, 13% in math, 8% in English, and 4% in psychology.

http://www.educationnews.org/higher-education/open-educational-resources-adopted-slowly-report-shows/

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Can more be done to retain women in engineering?

September 23rd, 2016

BY LAURA DEVANEY, eCampus News

Although 20 percent of engineering graduates are women, only 11 percent of professional engineers are women, according to the National Science Foundation. Women account for 47 percent of the labor force, and more than 40 percent of all four-year degrees granted in the last 5 years–making women’s representation in engineering even more troubling. The numbers are a stark reminder that there is much work to be done to bring gender balance to the fields of engineering and technology.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/news/can-done-retain-women-engineering/

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The Challenge of Understanding MOOC Data

September 23rd, 2016

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

Plenty of scholarly research has come out about massive open online courses since edX’s official introduction in 2012. What’s lesser covered is how the institutions running the MOOCs have used the data to improve learning in their regular courses. Part of the reason for that is that the colleges and universities involved in edX don’t necessarily have the resources — expertise, tools or understanding — to exploit the torrents of data their courses generate. Four smallish eastern liberal arts colleges working with edX — Colgate, Davidson, Hamilton and Wellesley — formed a collaborative in 2013 to share the cost and expertise of developing their online offerings, encourage cross-teaching among faculty, bulk up on the amount of data available for research and build systems for managing the MOOC data.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/09/14/the-challenge-of-understanding-mooc-data.aspx

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Want to Cut Innovation Risk in Higher Ed? Follow These Indicators

September 22nd, 2016

By Cristi Ford and Sharon Goodall, EdSurge

In higher education, it’s paramount that we be able to recognize patterns and trends early in the life of a cutting-edge project. Innovation initiatives need time to mature from development through evaluation, the higher-ed culture generally eschews risk, and, in an era of competing agendas, tight budgets and impatient stakeholders, projects need to fail fast or pivot so that institutions can maximize their investment dollars. Luckily, identifying leading indicators for success in higher-ed innovation is easier than finding unicorns—the next $1 billion startups—or understanding the nuances of digital currency. If you pay early attention to certain aspects of your innovation work, you can more clearly forecast results and keep the initiative steering toward success.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-09-16-want-to-cut-innovation-risk-in-higher-ed-follow-these-indicators

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Ask an Economist: How Can Today’s College Students Future-Proof Their Careers?

September 22nd, 2016

by JOE PINSKER, the Atlantic

It is by now close to certain that there are millions of people currently in high school and college who are fine-tuning their skills for steady-looking careers that will, following technological breakthroughs, dissipate by the time they retire. A 2013 study out of Oxford—the one that’s most frequently cited in any discussion of the future of labor—estimated that just shy of half of American jobs were at risk of being swallowed up by advances in automation. In anticipation of changes like this, is there anything that today’s college students can do now to future-proof their careers? A panel of experts gives some (pretty dispiriting) advice to a generation that will come of age as automation does.

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/09/how-can-todays-college-students-futureproof-their-careers/499244/

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U.S. E-learning Market to Exceed $48 Billion by 2020

September 22nd, 2016

By Chelsea Legendre, MeriTalk

The e-learning market in the United States is forecast to grow by 15.64 percent by 2020. The “E-learning Markets in the US 2016-2020” report points to cloud-based solutions as a key trend over the next few years. This growth is due to “the introduction of education technology and online content into the curriculum,” said Jhansi Mary J, lead analyst at Technavio. “Cloud solutions have restructured the aspects of education such as content creation, content delivery, and accessibility, making it more productive, convenient, and effective.” New education technologies include 3-D printing, simulations, and Augmented Reality (AR). The trend is driven by both traditional and online schools, which is due in part to government involvement.

https://www.meritalk.com/articles/u-s-e-learning-market-to-exceed-48-billion-by-2020/

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Online learning an appealing alternative to traditional college experience

September 21st, 2016

by Kellyn Willis, NWI

Online learning has become a staple in the life of a college student. Colleges are making classes, certificate programs, and degrees more convenient to every type of student without sacrificing the quality of the education. So what does a typical online course look like? According to Dr. Gina Rodriguez, vice president of academic affairs at Calumet College of St. Joseph, one of the most popular types of classes at her university is a hybrid class. “Hybrid courses are courses where students come to class and meet occasionally, but most work is done online,” she says. This gives students the opportunity to meet their professors and classmates, then continue to do the work online and on their own time. At Calumet College, this is offered in numerous graduate programs, and some undergraduate programs as well. “This is an area where we have moved forward significantly,” Rodriguez says.

http://www.nwitimes.com/news/education/online-learning-an-appealing-alternative-to-traditional-college-experience/article_05aa7337-0805-5dc9-9643-e985dec11e95.html

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Miami University lowers online tuition for winter and summer terms

September 21st, 2016

BY ALTHEA E. PERLEY,

Beginning this coming January, Miami University is lowering tuition costs for online classes by 20 percent during summer and winter terms for Ohio residents. Announced in the June minutes from the Board of Trustees meeting, under the Ohio State House Bill 64 Affordability Act, the institution received a 5 percent reduction cost and wants to pay it forward to its students. “It wasn’t advertised, it wouldn’t be in our purview to leverage the bill or the advertising, however as an institution we are excited to lower the cost for our students,” said Dave Sauter, university registrar.

http://patch.com/ohio/miamiuniversity-oxford/miami-university-lowers-online-tuition-winter-summer-terms

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A trio of short-term trends may also hold long-term promise

September 21st, 2016

BY STEPHEN NOONOO, eSchool News

Take a casual flip through this year’s trend-predicting Horizon Report, released today, and you’ll find plenty to get excited about. The end of the report is stuffed with tantalizing promise about how future learners will engage with robots, artificial intelligence, virtual reality, and wearable tech (think data-collecting headbands and skill-tracking sensors) that could explode into classrooms in as little as four to five years. By contrast, the report’s short-term developments, online learning and makerspaces, have a distinct yesterday’s news vibe about them. But make no mistake, they still hold some of the biggest long-term promise in the report.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2016/09/14/making-coding-online-learning-real-trends-watch/
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Google Australia extends online classes for tech teachers

September 20th, 2016

by Simon Sharwood, the Register

Australia’s digital technologies curriculum has been welcome by everyone as fine idea, but has also sparked worries from teachers about how they’ll skill up to handle the new lessons. The nation’s States are taking different approaches to training teachers and applying different levels of resources to the task. Google, as is its wont, thinks the internet is the best way to train teachers since 2013. Now the company says it has expanded its online resources with Professional Learning In a Box resources covering:

Algorithms

Visual Programming

Binary 101

Makey Makey Project Workshop

Game Development Workshop

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/09/13/google_australia_extends_online_classes_for_tech_teachers/

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Silicon Valley online course to mint self-driving car engineers

September 20th, 2016

By Heather Somerville, Reuters

Silicon Valley is creating a crash course in self-driving car technology to address a shortage of engineers with help from a startup in a different field: online education. In about a year’s time, a Lincoln sedan will be driving itself from Mountain View to San Francisco, using software developed by 250 or so students enrolled at education start-up Udacity, if all goes according to plan. Udacity bought the Lincoln already equipped with the digital interface needed in autonomous vehicles; students will write the code. Udacity’s course, which costs $2,400 for three, 12-week terms, starts next month and was designed by company co-founder Sebastian Thrun, who launched Google’s driverless car program.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-udacity-autonomous-idUSKCN11J24G

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CLC adds online course to honors program

September 20th, 2016

By BRAINERD DISPATCH

Central Lakes College is offering its first online course through its honors program. The course, Intercultural Communication, will be followed next school year with another online honors course called Interpersonal Communication. “Online courses work best for a lot of students, including some in our technical programs, so we wanted to make sure these students had access to our honors program,” said Adam Marcotte, English instructor and honors program coordinator, in a news release. Previously, honors courses were only offered in face-to-face class settings.

http://www.brainerddispatch.com/news/4114855-clc-adds-online-course-honors-program

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Poll reveals connections between college, professional engagement

September 19th, 2016

By Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

A new study from Gallup suggests that students who are exposed to nurturing faculty and engaging internship or extracurricular experiences have double the amount of professional satisfaction in their post-collegiate lives. The survey of more than 60,000 college graduates reveals that these elements, which could be classified as customer service elements in the college setting, promote key metrics of individual purpose and well-being in financial, social and emotional areas of life. Gallup recommends that colleges increase their focus on mentoring and career development to help students make stronger connections between college preparation and their success in working and personal development.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/poll-reveals-connections-between-college-professional-engagement/426277/

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Public Opinion on Higher Education

September 19th, 2016

by Public Agenda

Americans are increasingly uncertain about the necessity of college for success in the workforce, according to our recent survey, funded by The Kresge Foundation. For many years, when we asked the public the question, “Do you think that a college education is necessary for a person to be successful in today’s work world,” an increasing percentage of Americans said yes. That trend has shifted since the Great Recession. Now, just 42 percent of Americans say college is necessary for workforce success, a 13 percent drop from 2009. Fifty-seven percent of Americans say there are many ways to succeed in today’s world without a college degree, a 14 percent increase from 2009.

http://www.publicagenda.org/pages/public-opinion-higher-education-2016

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Research: Robots Give Chronically Ill Kids Valuable Social Ties with School

September 19th, 2016

By Dian Schaffhauser, THE Journal

A University of California Irvine research project may be the first of its kind to measure the impact and feasibility of the use of robots to bring homebound students into the classroom when they can’t be there physically. The use of “virtual inclusion” through telepresence has been used for nearly two decades. More recently, the idea is that chronically ill students use some kind of robotic device on campus that can be operated from home to allow him or her to participate in class, interact with fellow students and navigate through school.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/09/12/robots-give-chronically-ill-kids-valuable-social-ties-with-school.aspx

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