Online Learning Update

September 25, 2017

How to avoid degree ‘mills’ and online college scams

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

Jessica Presinzano, North Jersey

Looking to enter an online degree program to help your career or gain a new skill set? Welcome. You are about to join 5.8 million other Americans who have enrolled in an online class. Online learning goes by many names, including a virtual classroom, MOOC (massive open online course), e-learning or online course, but all offer learning convenience and flexibility. That is, as long as you’re not getting scammed. Education scams aren’t new. Degree “mills” and fake university scams (think of the 2006 movie “Accepted”) have existed since the 19th century, but learning online has made it easier for scammers to cheat you out of your education — and money.

http://www.northjersey.com/story/news/education/2017/09/15/how-avoid-degree-mills-and-online-college-scams/669295001/

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Humboldt State offering online class for parents Course aims to help their student succeed

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Geneva Peppars, KRCR

Humboldt State University is now offering a new online class to help family members get educated on how they can help their student succeed in college. The course is called Forever Humboldt Families 101 and the class launched in August, coinciding with the beginning of the Fall Semester. Parents were introduced to the course during student orientation. HSU is not the first university to have parent programs, however, the campus is taking an unusual approach for families to familiarize themselves with the college experience. Family members take the course for free through “Canvas”, the same online learning system used by HSU students. The course covers topics such as the transition to college, academic support, student health, and campus involvement.

http://www.krcrtv.com/north-coast-news/humboldt-state-offering-online-class-for-parents/620913706

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How Big is the LMS Market?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

I’m trying to figure out the size of the learning management system (LMS) market.
The problem with numbers related to educational technology is that you just can’t trust them.  Do a Google search for the size of the LMS market and you get some really big numbers, and wide discrepancies in the estimates. A Google search about the global educational technology market yields an estimate that worldwide spending on e-learning will reach $325 billion by 2025. A Business Wire report puts the global higher education technology market at $29 billion. Until I really understand where all these estimates about the edtech and LMS market come from, I plan to be skeptical about any numbers related to the edtech industry.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/how-big-lms-market

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September 24, 2017

7 tech innovations that are drastically changing the way people learn

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:11 am

by LUCAS MILLER, the Next Web

When we discuss technology innovations, we usually focus on the ways that new tech is making our lives easier. While this is certainly a great perk of technology, it also causes us to overlook an even better benefit of the new innovations and developments we see on a daily basis: how technology is improving learning. Both inside and outside the classroom, the following tech innovations are having a drastic impact on the way people learn, helping to change education for the better.

https://thenextweb.com/contributors/2017/09/11/7-tech-innovations-drastically-changing-way-people-learn/

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On-Demand Learning – in an On-Demand World

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

By Ben Henderson, eLearning Inside

Within the e-Learning industry, we are familiar with buzz words and fancy expressions which aim to revitalize old ideas and learning concepts. Be it ‘flipping the classroom’ or ‘gamify learning’, these seemingly new notions crop up every so often, convincing L&D departments that this is the method which will finally make compliance training exciting and engaging. So is ‘on-demand learning’ the new kid at school, or is there actually substance and value in the concept from an L&D perspective? During the last educational technology event I attended, I heard a learning platform company referring to themselves as the ‘Netflix of learning’. ‘This sounds great’, I initially thought. Most of us are familiar with Netflix and its personalized dashboard, customized to our own desires and available anytime, anywhere. I instantly thought that from an engagement point of view, branding a learning platform in a similar way to Netflix was a clever (but potentially deceptive) idea, but is it any more effective than a standard LMS in disseminating learning content?

https://news.elearninginside.com/demand-learning-demand-world/

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eLearning Helps Classes Stay on Track During Hurricane Season

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Cait Etherington, eLearning Inside

Just as some schools located in northern regions of the nation have started to replace snow days with virtual school days, in the South, a growing number of public schools, colleges and universities are relying on eLearning to keep classes on schedule even during weather crises. This year, as the region is devastated by a series of hurricanes, eLearning is already proving critical.  The Kingwood area north of Houston was slammed by Harvey, but it was the runoff from the storm that caused the most damage. In fact, the Lone Star College system has closed its Kingwood campus and doesn’t expect it to be back up and running for two months. Despite this, Lone Star College remains in full operation.  The Lone Star College system’s chancellor, Steve Head, told Inside Higher Education that more than 35,000 of the system’s nearly 90,000 students are already enrolled in online courses: “We’re very technologically advanced here.

eLearning Helps Classes Stay on Track During Hurricane Season

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September 23, 2017

Forecast for eLearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:07 am

by PiWorld

One trend in eLearning involves the incorporation of video, and this practice will continue to grow. While informal online video-based learning has been taking place for as long as there have been online videos, the goal of formal eLearning approaches is to incorporate video-based content in structured training frameworks. Another trend in online learning involves compatibility with mobile devices. Mobile learning, or mLearning, has been a buzzword for a number of years, and a study by RnRMarketResearch.com predicts that this segment of the online learning market should grow to $37.60 billion by 2020 with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 36.3%. A related trend takes advantage of mobile-enabled virtual reality (VR) systems. A final burgeoning practice in eLearning involves the incorporation of “Big Data” to provide increased personalization.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/flipped-courses-and-costs

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How to Fulfill the Promise of Online Education

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

by JANE S. SHAW, the Spectator

Many colleges and universities have hired private companies to build and operate their online education programs. Firms such as Academic Programs, 2U, Coursera, the College Network, and Pearson work quietly behind the scenes to convert traditional courses to online formats, recruit students, follow up with students, and even supply courses. They are known as online program managers (OPMs). The Century Foundation, an explicitly progressive organization, recently expressed concern about these relationships. Its report, authored by Margaret Mattes, was based on reviews of 117 contracts between nonprofit schools (mostly public universities) and private OPMs. She concluded the companies provide “services so intertwined with the actual teaching and learning” that they may undermine the independence of the universities.

https://spectator.org/how-to-fulfill-the-promise-of-online-education/

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Online enrollment a key to UNA’s future

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Times-Daily
The number of students taking at least one class at the University of North Alabama this fall will be lower for the first time in three years. The loss appears to be in the freshman class. With semester enrollment set to be frozen today, Ron Patterson, vice president over enrollment management, reported Wednesday the preliminary numbers indicate there will be 7,388 enrolled this semester. That’s 129 less than the final enrollment count for the fall semester a year ago (7,517), or a 1.7 percent decline.

http://www.timesdaily.com/opinion/editorials/online-enrollment-a-key-to-una-s-future/article_7963eaa1-bbd1-5863-a949-bb9e6695b2c5.html

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September 22, 2017

US Dept of Ed approves sale of Kaplan to Purdue

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:15 am

by Autumn A. Arnett, Education Dive

The U.S. Department of Education has approved the sale of Kaplan University to Purdue University — a controversial transaction which came with a $1 price tag and allows the Kaplan company to still maintain administrative control, while potentially reaping profits. The department also gave its blessing on the sale of for-profit Art Institutes, which Buzzfeed calls “much murkier” because the buyer, the Dream Center, is “a tiny, inexperienced nonprofit.” These approvals are a good sign for the rest of the industry, as more for-profit institutions consider converting to non-profits as a way to revive the struggling institutions.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/us-dept-of-ed-approves-sale-of-kaplan-to-purdue/505219/

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Federal Audit Challenges Faculty Role at WGU

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:11 am

By Paul Fain, Inside Higher Ed

Education Department’s inspector general labels Western Governors as a correspondence-course provider, seeks reimbursement of $713 million in aid and may broadly threaten competency-based education. The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Inspector General has released the results of a much anticipated high-stakes audit of Western Governors University, with negative findings that could threaten the large online university and, more broadly, the growing field of competency-based education. Citing concerns about an inadequate faculty role — which the competency-based university contests — the inspector general called for the department to make WGU pay back at least $713 million in federal financial aid.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/09/21/education-depts-inspector-general-calls-western-governors-repay-713-million-federal

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Survey of Tech in Education Finds Mixed Results

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

If you’re trying to hunt down research to justify the use of technology in the classroom or argue against it, a working paper may provide you with information you need. “Education Technology: An Evidence-Based Review,” published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), takes a global view in examining how technology can be used to support K–12 and post-secondary education. The goal? To figure out what the literature says overall about causal effects or lack thereof in four areas.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/09/14/survey-of-tech-in-education-finds-mixed-results.aspx

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September 21, 2017

Standard Operating Procedure?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Mark Lieberman, Inside Higher Ed

A regional accreditor recently denied an Arizona community college’s bid to increase its online degree offerings.  In particular, the reviewers found a lack of required training for online instruction and a general lack of consistency. Meanwhile, success rates in Scottsdale Community College’s face-to-face courses stood at 75.2 percent, compared to 65.4 percent in online courses last fall. This issue prompted several questions: How much standardization of course design, navigation, underlying technology and academic support (among other features) should an institution mandate — and be required to mandate — for its online courses? How should colleges and universities balance the potentially conflicting goals of ensuring that its distance education courses are student centered and of maintaining faculty control over course content?

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2017/09/20/experts-weigh-standardization-accreditor-dings-arizona-community

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Students have new ways of measuring degrees of success

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

By Jeffrey J. Selingo, Washington Post

Fewer students are going to college this fall, as enrollment in higher education has fallen for five straight years, according to the National Student Clearinghouse, which tracks enrollment. Some 2.4 million fewer students are enrolled than at the recent peak in 2011.  Several factors are to blame for declining enrollments…. But a third factor that is rarely discussed is also at play: the rise of alternative types of higher-education credentials in an age when we always need to be learning…. The demand for alternative types of credentials suggests another reason: Colleges might not be offering what students want and what today’s workforce needs as entire occupations expand and contract at an alarming pace.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/grade-point/wp/2017/09/17/students-have-new-ways-of-measuring-degrees-of-success/

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A New Way to Learn Economics

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

By John Cassidy, the New Yorker

With the new school year starting, there is good news for incoming students of economics—and anybody else who wants to learn about issues like inequality, globalization, and the most efficient ways to tackle climate change. A group of economists from both sides of the Atlantic, part of a project called core Econ, has put together a new introductory economics curriculum, one that is modern, comprehensive, and freely available online.

https://www.newyorker.com/news/john-cassidy/a-new-way-to-learn-economics

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September 20, 2017

Digital English Market in China Surges to $1.4 Billion by 2022

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:07 am

by Markets Insider

The growth rate for Digital English Language Learning in China is a healthy 8.5% and revenues will spike to $1.4 billion by 2022, according to the new report by Metaari called “The 2017-2022 China Digital English Language Learning Market.” There are six major catalysts driving the current Digital English Language Learning market in China: a booming online English tutoring industry, a dramatic increase in private investments made to digital English companies, emphasis on digital English in the schools, the growing use of English in the higher education segment, strong consumer demand for mobile Digital English Language Learning apps, and a high demand for English for Specific Purposes (ESP).

http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/Digital-English-Market-in-China-Surges-to-1-4-Billion-by-2022-1002359286

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New study points to benefits of personalized learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Linda Jacobson, Education Dive

A new study from Education Elements finds that personalized learning programs, in which students typically work at their own pace on laptops or tablets, are leading to growth in math and reading skills, according to Business Insider. The consulting organization’s study of 36,000 students in five districts focuses on performance on the NWEA’s MAP and other assessments, and one Alabama district saw 72% of students in grades 3 through 8 reach their target scores on the ACT Aspire test, up from just 28% in the 2014-15 school year. The article notes additional research from the RAND Corporation, which suggested that students using online learning programs performed better than those in classrooms where teachers lectured.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/new-study-points-to-benefits-of-personalized-learning/504663/

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This Is How Entrepreneurs, Students And Teachers Can Benefit From LinkedIn Learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

Robyn Shulman, Forbes

LinkedIn Learning provides a personalized learning experience via high-quality, personally curated and easily digestible content. The platform has more than 10,000 courses across business, creative and tech categories and offers this content in English, Spanish, French, German and Japanese. Higher education students will also find various resources on LinkedIn. Beside LinkedIn Learning, students can stop by LinkedIn for Students for a plethora of resources including LinkedIn “how-to” videos, tip sheets, career guides, and handbooks. For those on their career paths for the jobs of tomorrow, LinkedIn also provides the opportunity for students to become campus editors for their institutions. Students who like to write, curate content, and represent their universities can find applications open now for the 2017-2018 school year.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/robynshulman/2017/09/11/this-is-how-entrepreneurs-students-and-teachers-can-benefit-from-linkedin-learning/#6f9b5a792ec9

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September 19, 2017

Georgia Tech presents model for designing online degrees

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by Shalina Chatlani, Education Dive

In a guest post for Evolllution, Shabana Figueroa and Yakut Gazi of Georgia Institute of Technology’s Professional Education (GTPE) division detail how the institution worked to develop an efficient design approach for its second entirely-online master’s degree program, which would also improve student user experience studied from the launch of the first online degree.  Among these strategies, the authors write that for site development GTPE created a group cross-functional group of independent instructional design and studio teams, the director of learning met one-on-one with faculty members to figure out course content and teaching styles and attended some in-person class sessions for inspiration, and the faculty worked in two-to-four hour design sessions so that content was 95% complete before production commenced.  Some challenges the authors list include needing to become comfortable with the edX hosting platform, developing logistics and technology to handle proctored exams, meeting the needs of students through flexibility, and designing various versions of the same courses for different cohorts. And with the guidance of faculty, the team was able to begin the project in Dec. 2016 and finish in mid-August of 2017 — which is on track for one year.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/georgia-tech-presents-model-for-designing-online-degrees/504806/

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Seven Steps toward IT Accessibility Compliance

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Sheryl Burgstahler and Christian Vinten-Johansen, EDUCAUSE Review
Colleges and universities are subject to various laws and regulations regarding the accessibility of the IT resources they provide. Accessibility leadership can and should come from different levels of an organization. Full accessibility compliance can seem intimidating, but it’s important to begin the work, develop priorities, and sustain the effort.

http://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/9/seven-steps-toward-it-accessibility-compliance

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Report: Faculty want more OER-here’s why

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am
By LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News

The study, Launching OER Degree Pathways: An Early Snapshot of Achieving the Dream’s OER Degree Initiative and Emerging Lessons, was released by Achieving the Dream (ATD) and conducted by SRI International and the rpk GROUP. The report indicates that faculty at colleges participating in ATD’s OER Degree Initiative are changing their teaching and that students are at least as or more engaged using OER courses than students in non-OER classrooms. Eighty-four percent of faculty members surveyed said students in the new OER courses had the same or a higher level of engagement with the learning materials as compared to courses they have taught using traditional course materials. Meanwhile, faculty with experience in using open resources who received assistance from technology specialists and librarians in developing their courses were most likely to report changes in their teaching, the report says.

https://www.ecampusnews.com/curriculum/report-faculty-oer/

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