Online Learning Update

January 18, 2018

5 Steps to Restart Online College After Failing, Dropping Out #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Bradley Fuster, US News

After assessing what went wrong the first time around, look into online programs that better meet your needs.  Picking up the pieces and restarting an online bachelor’s program following an unsuccessful first attempt is difficult but admirable. Returning to an online college may also still be the best path to academic recovery as a working adult. Here are five steps to take if you’re ready to return as an online student after previously failing or dropping out of an online undergraduate program. Be sure to also consult an adviser with questions along the way.

https://www.usnews.com/education/online-learning-lessons/articles/2018-01-09/restart-an-online-bachelors-program-after-failing-dropping-out

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How Long Does It Take to Develop One Hour of Training? Updated for 2017

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

By Robyn Defelice, ATD

In this article, we will explore the results from a 2017 survey, compare that data to the previous two studies, and discuss a few trends that have emerged over the years. If you are unfamiliar with the research, the data helps to squelch the desire to say, “It depends…” when a client asks how long it will take to develop training. These numbers provide another way for project planners to budget time and resources, and they can be used in place of or in conjunction with estimates based on old projects with similar needs. At a minimum, it provides a method for making estimates, comparisons, or both.

https://www.td.org/insights/how-long-does-it-take-to-develop-one-hour-of-training-updated-for-2017

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Your School Should Not Pursue Online Education for the Money #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

Any online program that has the main goal of revenue generation will, in the end, wind up creating a host of unforeseen and undesirable consequences. This is not to say that online program should not be economically sustainable, and should make sense from an opportunity cost and investment perspective. They should, and they are. In some cases it is also true that new online programs can create revenues that can be utilized to support other strategic programs and initiatives. Higher education, like many activities that exist for the public good, relies on cost sharing to survive. Putting money as the first and ultimate goal of online education will cause a school to make a series of bad choices, while simultaneously closing off other potential benefits of online learning.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/your-school-should-not-pursue-online-education-money

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January 17, 2018

At MIT, It’s Out With The Old Case Studies, In With Immersive Ones #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:07 am

by Fred Thys, WBUR
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s leading role in online education for all is changing how its own faculty approach more traditional education. For example, at the MIT Center for Real Estate, professors are rethinking the case study approach common in management training.  The change stems from an effort to introduce case studies to MIT’s “Massive Open Online Courses,” better known as MOOCs. “Of course, the classic case study, it’s a PDF file, about 15 to 20 pages,” says the center’s director, Albert Saiz. “It’s very difficult to implement in an online class. Attention spans of students, especially younger students, are getting shorter.” So Saiz led a team that developed case studies designed to more easily hold the attention of big audiences.

http://www.wbur.org/edify/2018/01/08/mit-case-study-online

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The most popular online courses in the world #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

by Jamie McKane, My Broadband

Online learning portal Coursera has released its list of the most popular online courses on its platform. Coursera boasts over 30 million registered learners and over 2,000 online courses from institutions around the world. Upon completing courses online, students are awarded with a signed and shareable electronic course certificate. Specialisation certificates and university-recognised degrees are also offered through the platform. Coursera’s 10 most popular courses highlight a growing global interest in emerging technologies – including blockchains, machine learning, and neural networks.

https://mybroadband.co.za/news/internet/243612-the-most-popular-online-courses-in-the-world.html

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Online course enrollments continue to grow #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Jeremy House, Education Dive
According to new federal data, the number of college students taking online classes continues to grow, reports Inside Higher Ed. In academic year 2016, 6.34 million students were enrolled in at least one online course, compared with 5.99 million students in 2015.  Even as overall enrollment at postsecondary institutions is flat (unlike recent numbers from the National Student Clearinghouse, the federal data show enrollments staying roughly constant, not declining), online enrollments climb.  Enrollment dipped for a few universities with large online programs — especially those offered by for-profits — but most experienced a online student enrollment boost.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/online-course-enrollments-continue-to-grow/514255/

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January 16, 2018

Are Prospective Students About to Disappear?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed

New book says most colleges — and the vast majority of nonelite institutions — are about to face severe shortage of potential students.  Yes, everyone in admissions knows that certain groups of students — those who graduate from good high schools and have parents able to pay a significant share or all of their tuition and other college expenses — are shrinking in number. And the situation is more severe in the Northeast and Midwest, where populations are shrinking, than in other parts of the country. Those demographic realities, known for years, have led colleges to adjust strategies: new programs to attract adult students. Online education. More outreach to parts of the country where the population is growing. Attracting full-pay international students. Some combination of those and other ideas will work for most institutions, enrollment professionals have said. But what if they are wrong? What if the demographics are about to get much worse for higher education than the experts have expected?

https://www.insidehighered.com/admissions/article/2018/01/08/new-book-argues-most-colleges-are-about-face-significant-decline

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Small College Struggles in the Sights

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

by Rick Seltzer, Inside Higher Ed

Heightened concern about liberal arts institutions is reflected in presidents’ outlooks and an institute program. Numerous presidents at the institute agreed that they see an increased urgency among their peers interested in exploring significant changes in order to stabilize their colleges’ standing or seek long-term viability. In a few cases, presidents pointed to a confluence of trends causing them to reconsider doing business as usual, such as a declining number of traditional high school graduates in their regions, increased financial pressures, stiffer competition from public institutions or the free public college movement. More often, presidents reported having long been aware of headwinds. But their Boards of Trustees, alumni and faculty members have recently become more open to making significant changes, they said.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/01/08/cic-presidents-institute-increases-focus-solutions-struggling-colleges

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Survey: Students sing praises for digital learning tech #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News.
Students said they vastly prefer classes with digital learning technologies.   Ninety-four percent of students in a new survey said digital learning technologies have helped them retain new concepts, and 53 percent said they prefer classes that use such tools. McGraw-Hill Education’s fourth annual Digital Study Trends Survey, compiled by Hanover Research, includes responses from more than 1,000 college students. Sixty percent of surveyed students said they think digital learning technologies have improved their grades, and one-fifth said those technologies significantly improved their grades. Students in STEM majors were the most likely to say technology has positively impacted their grades. Approximately 60 percent of students agree that digital learning technology increased their engagement with course materials.

Survey: Students sing praises for digital learning tech

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January 15, 2018

10 Things Children Born in 2018 Will Probably Never Experience

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

by Kristin Houser and Patrick Caughill, Futurism

Children born in 2018 will probably never know the feeling of being tethered to a landline. A trip to the local megaplex to catch Blade Runner 2049 may have stirred up adults’ memories of seeing the original, but children born this year may never know what it’s like to watch a film on a smaller screen with a sound system that doesn’t rattle the brain. Technology is currently advancing faster than ever before, so what else will kids born today only read about in books or, more likely, on computer screens? Here’s a list of the top 10 things that children born in 2018 will likely never experience.

10 Things Children Born in 2018 Will Probably Never Experience

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3 big ways today’s college students are different from just a decade ago

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by  BY MERIS STANSBURY, eCampus News

Gen Z, the digital generation, non-traditional students, and potentially many more descriptions have been used to label the current postsecondary body of students, but what may not be so evident is exactly how much their preferences, lifestyles and experiences have radically changed from even a decade ago.  And it’s these large changes that are critical for colleges and universities not just to take notice of now, but also to anticipate what students and their needs may look like in 2027.

#3: 3 big ways today’s college students are different from just a decade ago

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Apple Waives Developer Fees for Schools, Nonprofits

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Joshua Bolkan, THE Journal
Apple is now waiving the fees for its developer program for accredited educational institutions and other qualifying organizations. Members of the developer program are able to distribute apps through the Apple App Store and gain access to tools such as app analytics, beta testing resources such as TestFlight, beta software and advanced app capabilities. The move comes in response to complaints directed at the company when it banned apps generated from templates last year, according to TechCrunch.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2018/01/03/apple-waives-developer-fees-for-schools-nonprofits.aspx

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January 14, 2018

As Universities Go Online, Architects Rework Buildings For ‘Active’ Learning #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Adam Gordon, Forbes
Many leaders in industries going through digital transformation experience a certain spine-tickling moment when “futures flip-over” happens. That moment is when you get-it that the previously marginal online offering has become the default and the traditional solution has become the exotic. It has happened in music, in newspapers, etc., and this is where university campuses and business schools are fast heading as education designers, coders and entrepreneurs close in on online platforms that replicate and in many ways improve on the traditional live experience. All for much less money.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/adamgordon/2018/01/05/as-universities-go-online-architects-rework-buildings-for-active-learning/#38e5d2db2a24

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Worldwide change takes global effort

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

by MIT Open Learning

In keeping with its mission to expand access to affordable education around the world through the innovative use of online learning, MIT Open Learning welcomes an international university that has elected to grant course credits to their students who complete the MITx MicroMasters in Data, Economics, and Development Policy (DEDP). The American University in Cairo (AUC) will be the first school in the world to pair with MIT in accepting the DEDP MicroMasters credential to help students embark on their master’s education.

http://news.mit.edu/2018/mit-auc-partnership-masters-credits-mitx-0105

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Gain Skills in Online Courses Requiring Group Work

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Marian Stoltz-Loike, US News

Group work in online classes can teach students about working with others remotely and giving virtual presentations.  Many careers today involve collaborating virtually with colleagues who may be located throughout the country or even internationally. To be successful, you will need to develop strong strategies to get the work done – and this can be challenging. Online courses may require students to complete projects virtually in groups, which can teach them critical skills for the fast-paced, rapidly changing, 24/7 global business world. Linked below are four areas where you can develop skills through group work in an online degree program.

https://www.usnews.com/education/online-learning-lessons/articles/2018-01-05/gain-skills-in-online-courses-requiring-group-work

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January 13, 2018

What Online Faculty Can Do to Avoid Burnout #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:11 am

By: Edna Murugan, Faculty Focus

With the increase in online classes being offered by higher education institutions and the convenience and flexibility it affords (particularly for adult learners), it is important that institutions hire, train, and retain high-quality, student-centric online faculty. Just like on-ground students, online students need instructors who are passionate, organized, creative, and manage the (virtual) classroom effectively. Unfortunately, from time to time, online faculty can struggle with burnout, which may make them less effective instructors. Although from the outside, it may appear that online instructors have a dream job that allows them to work from home and set their own schedules, many online faculty experience some form of burnout.

https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/online-education/online-faculty-can-avoid-burnout/

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‘Just another day:’ Wake Tech online students attend class on snow day #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by WRAL

For some Triangle students, the weather had no impact on their courses. Students enrolled in online courses at Wake Technical Community College students went to class Thursday, never setting foot in the snow. For Dr. Chris Roddenberry, a professor at Wake Tech Community College, today was business as usual. He taught a class, while sitting in his Willow Springs home. He even met with multiple students, online, for office hours. “It was just another Thursday for me,” he said. “Classes started, students were registering in my class. I had meetings with different students. Nothing changed for me.” Roddenberry said there are many benefits to online classes, and inclement weather is a classic example.

http://www.wral.com/-just-another-day-wake-tech-online-students-attend-class-on-snowy-day/17234539/

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34th annual Distance Teaching & Learning Conference: August 7-9, 2018 #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

Call for Proposals open! Seeking expert and engaging presenters. The DTL conference invites you to submit a proposal to present at the 34th annual Distance Teaching & Learning Conference, August 7-9, 2018in Madison, Wisconsin. We are looking for quality presentations intended for advanced practitioners in distance, online, or blended education and training. We will also consider some basic/foundational proposals geared toward those newer to the field. All proposals should be grounded in evidence-based practice and/or innovative strategies. Deadline to submit is 4:00 pm (CST) on Tuesday, January 23.

https://dtlconference.wisc.edu/call-for-proposals/

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January 12, 2018

5 ways to leverage UDL for student inclusivity

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:09 am

BY SUZANNE STOLZ, eSchool News

In recent years, general education teachers have joined special education teachers in emphasizing the need for inclusivity in the classroom. By creating inclusive classrooms, educators aim to foster learning environments that are equitable and nurturing to every student. Inclusive educators often use Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to provide students with consistent access to engaging content and effective paths for achieving educational goals in classrooms where they experience a greater sense of belonging. UDL, which is a set of principles for curriculum development that aims to provide all students an equal opportunity to learn, can be used by educators at any grade level or subject area. According to the National Center on Universal Design for Learning, “UDL provides a blueprint for creating instructional goals, methods, materials, and assessments that work for everyone—not a single, one-size-fits-all solution, but rather flexible approaches that can be customized and adjusted for individual needs.”

5 ways to leverage UDL for student inclusivity

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Newsflash: Preparing students for the future workforce is a society-wide effort

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

BY GERALDINE LEE, eSchool News
As technologies and the workforce change, society must help equip students with the skills for success. Today’s jobs are changing, and they are changing at such a rapid pace that many of the jobs our students will hold in the future do not even exist today. But just because we don’t know what those jobs are doesn’t mean we can’t do our best to prepare today’s students, and tomorrow’s work force, for the opportunities awaiting them. A large part of that preparation will rely on equal technology access to all students.

Newsflash: Preparing students for the future workforce is a society-wide effort

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As Campuses Move to Embrace OER, College Libraries Become Key Players

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by Jeffrey R. Young, EdSurge

Textbook publishers typically deploy sales reps to campuses to convince professors to adopt their titles. But who makes the pitch for free or low-cost alternatives to textbooks known as OER, or open educational resources? Increasingly, the answer is the campus library. Take the University of Texas at Arlington, which has a full-time Open Education Librarian, Michelle Reed. One project she led this year involved creating a series of videos promoting “Textbook Heroes,”professors who have replaced commercial textbooks in their courses with OER.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-01-04-as-campuses-move-to-embrace-oer-college-libraries-become-key-players

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