Online Learning Update

January 22, 2018

The Open Source University, its smart contracts, and tokens written

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by Jonathan Myers, IOC News

Open Source Unversity is a university based on the technology of Ethereum Blockchain. This university makes use of a highly customized smart contract. Additionally, it maintains the record of all the learners’ certificates and verifies them in Blockchain by making them accessible and immutable to all the organizations. It has a smart contract of learners and academia that aims to introduce traceability and transparency between academies and learners in a small environment. This smart contract has been built to completely revolutionize the system of learning. B2A smart contract is going to bring flexibility, security, and transparency in the system of education. Moreover, learners can get a lot of benefits from the online courses available on this platform. The ecosystem of the Open Source University has EDU tokens that are going to be used to establish connections between academia, learners, and business.

The Open Source University, its smart contracts, and tokens

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New analysis offers insight into what prospective students want

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:07 am

by Autumn A. Arnett, Education Dive
A recent analysis from Digital Media Solutions offers insight into where students are the most interested in higher education by tracking inquiries and student acquisition activities of institutions, finding that online program inquiry growth has increased tremendously. Online education volume was 34.9% higher in Q3 2017 than campus-based volume, the report said, compared with 8% higher in Q3 2016. Geographic volume data is largely consistent with population trends; the nine most populous states (California, Texas, Florida, New York, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Georgia, North Carolina) are also the top-nine states for higher ed inquiries and acquisitions in the DMS analysis. Arizona, which lands at tenth in higher education inquiries, leapfrogged over four states with higher population levels. Health professions and programs; business management, marketing and related services; and education claimed the top three spots for most-searched potential programs. Liberal arts and sciences/general studies and humanities programs were the ninth-most searched programs.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/new-analysis-offers-insight-into-what-prospective-students-want/

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eMarketer Unveils Latest Worldwide Social Users Estimates (one-third of the world’s population)

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by eMarketer News

One in three people—2.48 billion—worldwide used a social network in 2017, eMarketer estimates. Rising social network use in emerging markets in Asia-Pacific, Latin America and the Middle East and Africa drove an 8.7% gain over 2016. Social media use in digitally advanced markets in North America and Western Europe is widespread. Future growth will primarily come from widening and improving internet access in developing markets, thanks to increasingly affordable smartphone models and government investments in mobile broadband coverage.

 

https://www.emarketer.com/content/emarketer-unveils-latest-wordwide-social-users-estimates

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January 21, 2018

Online learning took a tech turn in 2017

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by Patrick Atack, PIE
Online learning platform Coursera has revealed a trend towards tech-based courses in 2017. The 30 million-user site divulged the top 10 popular courses, and the most popular specialisations, as signed up for by its “registered learners”.   Machine Learning, a course taught by Coursera’s co-founder Andrew Ng in conjunction with Stanford University, proved most popular, topping the list of courses that were based on the average daily enrolments. This course focuses on artificial intelligence and was among at least three AI-focused courses in the top 10. Blockchain, Cryptocurrencies and Bitcoin also feature, which may come as expected, as those have been the feature of many a press clipping in the past 12 months.

Online learning took a tech turn in 2017

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7 facts about the STEM workforce

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

BY NIKKI GRAF, RICHARD FRY AND CARY FUNK, Pew Fact Tank

Employment in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) occupations has grown 79% since 1990, from 9.7 million to 17.3 million, outpacing overall U.S. job growth. A new Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data takes a broad-based look at the STEM workforce from 1990 to 2016 based on an analysis of adults ages 25 and older working in any of 74 occupations. These include computer, math, engineering and architecture occupations, physical scientists, life scientists and health-related occupations such as health care practitioners and technicians, but not health care support workers such as nursing aides and medical assistants. Here are seven facts about the STEM workforce and STEM training.

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/01/09/7-facts-about-the-stem-workforce/

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When to Earn a Smaller Credential With Your Online Degree

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

By Jordan Friedman, US News

Online students may pursue a credential like a graduate certificate alongside their degree to satisfy additional career goals.  Experts say more online degree students are also concurrently seeking smaller online credentials to supplement their education. These may include online certificates offered through colleges and universities, digital badges or industry certifications.  Companies such as Coursera and edX, in collaboration with universities, create massive open online courses, or MOOCs.  Technology is constantly advancing, and sometimes an online degree’s curriculum can’t keep up with the latest changes, says Ray Schroeder, associate vice chancellor for online learning at the University of Illinois—Springfield. A smaller credential may be a good option to keep skills up-to-date. But he cautions prospective online students not to take on more than they can handle.

https://www.usnews.com/higher-education/online-education/articles/2018-01-10/when-to-supplement-an-online-degree-with-a-smaller-credential

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January 20, 2018

University of Alabama in Huntsville Student Success Center rolls out online academic coaching and tutoring

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:11 am

by Jim Steele, UAH

Starting in spring, students at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) will have a new and more convenient online tutoring and coaching option. The university’s Student Success Center (SSC) is rolling out a live tutoring and coaching service that works with desktops, laptops, iPads, iPhones and Android devices. The sessions will be held using the Zoom video conferencing software/app. “We piloted the program last semester for classes that we tutor and that are offered online, including writing,” says Melissa Berry, SSC virtual learning coordinator.

 

https://www.uah.edu/news/campus/student-success-center-rolls-out-online-academic-coaching-and-tutoring

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Study: More Students Are Enrolling in Online Courses

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

By Jordan Friedman, US News

Enrollment in online classes grew more than 5 percent between fall 2015 and 2016, a new report found. Based on federal data from more than 4,700 colleges and universities, more than 6.3 million students in the U.S. – most of whom were undergraduates – took at least one online course in fall 2016, a 5.6 percent increase from the previous year. This is the 14th consecutive year that Babson has reported growth in online enrollment.

https://www.usnews.com/higher-education/online-education/articles/2018-01-11/study-more-students-are-enrolling-in-online-courses

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Report: Students Need More Data on Potential Earnings of Graduate Programs

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

By Joelle Fredman, National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators

Despite the growing number of students acquiring master’s degrees, there is still little data on the potential earnings associated with graduate programs. Without this information, prospective students cannot make financially-informed decisions before investing in further schooling, according to a new paper by the American Enterprise Institute (AEI). The report, The Master’s as the New Bachelor’s Degree: In Search of the Labor Market Payoff, showcases program-level data collected from three states and aims to highlight, based on these findings, how crucial it is that this type of information is collected nationwide, specifically to help students escape loan debt.

https://www.nasfaa.org/news-item/14076/Report_Students_Need_More_Data_on_Potential_Earnings_of_Graduate_Programs

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January 19, 2018

EdTech: Big Data Analytics To Revolutionize Online Learning #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Marco De Novellis, Business Because

For Ian Myatt, director of educational enterprise at the University of Birmingham, big data analytics could significantly transform the way people learn, but it should be harnessed in the right way to be effective.  “There’s huge potential,” he says. “We strive to provide all students with an excellent experience, but traditional teaching methods make it difficult to customize for personal preferences. However, with online delivery and clever use of analytics, we can more readily accommodate individual learning styles and help them identify areas where they might benefit from a greater focus.”

https://www.businessbecause.com/news/mba-distance-learning/4993/edtech-big-data-analytics-online-learning

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How Admissions Works at Online Bachelor’s Programs #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

By Jordan Friedman, US News

Contrary to what some prospective students believe, online bachelor’s programs aren’t always easier to get into than those offered on a physical campus. That’s one of several findings based on an analysis of data that schools submitted to U.S. News in an annual survey about admission to online colleges. The average proportion of applicants who were admitted to online bachelor’s programs between July 2016 and June 2017 was just 2.4 percentage points higher than the average acceptance rate at their on-campus counterparts for students entering in fall 2016. U.S. News data also show that some online bachelor’s programs have lower acceptance rates than their respective in-person offerings.

https://www.usnews.com/higher-education/online-education/articles/2018-01-09/how-admissions-works-at-online-bachelors-programs

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How will the social media landscape change in 2018?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

How will the social media landscape change in 2018?
by Tereza Litsa, ClickZ

Even if our crystal ball doesn’t end up being accurate, these tips should help you:
Use social media to engage your audience.
Think like a human being, not like a brand.
Find the best ways to blend creativity and personalization.
Invest in analytics to find the challenging ROI.
Don’t forget to be authentic, even as an automated chatbot.​

How will the social media landscape change in 2018?

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January 18, 2018

5 Steps to Restart Online College After Failing, Dropping Out #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Bradley Fuster, US News

After assessing what went wrong the first time around, look into online programs that better meet your needs.  Picking up the pieces and restarting an online bachelor’s program following an unsuccessful first attempt is difficult but admirable. Returning to an online college may also still be the best path to academic recovery as a working adult. Here are five steps to take if you’re ready to return as an online student after previously failing or dropping out of an online undergraduate program. Be sure to also consult an adviser with questions along the way.

https://www.usnews.com/education/online-learning-lessons/articles/2018-01-09/restart-an-online-bachelors-program-after-failing-dropping-out

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How Long Does It Take to Develop One Hour of Training? Updated for 2017

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

By Robyn Defelice, ATD

In this article, we will explore the results from a 2017 survey, compare that data to the previous two studies, and discuss a few trends that have emerged over the years. If you are unfamiliar with the research, the data helps to squelch the desire to say, “It depends…” when a client asks how long it will take to develop training. These numbers provide another way for project planners to budget time and resources, and they can be used in place of or in conjunction with estimates based on old projects with similar needs. At a minimum, it provides a method for making estimates, comparisons, or both.

https://www.td.org/insights/how-long-does-it-take-to-develop-one-hour-of-training-updated-for-2017

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Your School Should Not Pursue Online Education for the Money #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

Any online program that has the main goal of revenue generation will, in the end, wind up creating a host of unforeseen and undesirable consequences. This is not to say that online program should not be economically sustainable, and should make sense from an opportunity cost and investment perspective. They should, and they are. In some cases it is also true that new online programs can create revenues that can be utilized to support other strategic programs and initiatives. Higher education, like many activities that exist for the public good, relies on cost sharing to survive. Putting money as the first and ultimate goal of online education will cause a school to make a series of bad choices, while simultaneously closing off other potential benefits of online learning.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/your-school-should-not-pursue-online-education-money

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January 17, 2018

At MIT, It’s Out With The Old Case Studies, In With Immersive Ones #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:07 am

by Fred Thys, WBUR
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s leading role in online education for all is changing how its own faculty approach more traditional education. For example, at the MIT Center for Real Estate, professors are rethinking the case study approach common in management training.  The change stems from an effort to introduce case studies to MIT’s “Massive Open Online Courses,” better known as MOOCs. “Of course, the classic case study, it’s a PDF file, about 15 to 20 pages,” says the center’s director, Albert Saiz. “It’s very difficult to implement in an online class. Attention spans of students, especially younger students, are getting shorter.” So Saiz led a team that developed case studies designed to more easily hold the attention of big audiences.

http://www.wbur.org/edify/2018/01/08/mit-case-study-online

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The most popular online courses in the world #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

by Jamie McKane, My Broadband

Online learning portal Coursera has released its list of the most popular online courses on its platform. Coursera boasts over 30 million registered learners and over 2,000 online courses from institutions around the world. Upon completing courses online, students are awarded with a signed and shareable electronic course certificate. Specialisation certificates and university-recognised degrees are also offered through the platform. Coursera’s 10 most popular courses highlight a growing global interest in emerging technologies – including blockchains, machine learning, and neural networks.

https://mybroadband.co.za/news/internet/243612-the-most-popular-online-courses-in-the-world.html

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Online course enrollments continue to grow #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Jeremy House, Education Dive
According to new federal data, the number of college students taking online classes continues to grow, reports Inside Higher Ed. In academic year 2016, 6.34 million students were enrolled in at least one online course, compared with 5.99 million students in 2015.  Even as overall enrollment at postsecondary institutions is flat (unlike recent numbers from the National Student Clearinghouse, the federal data show enrollments staying roughly constant, not declining), online enrollments climb.  Enrollment dipped for a few universities with large online programs — especially those offered by for-profits — but most experienced a online student enrollment boost.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/online-course-enrollments-continue-to-grow/514255/

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January 16, 2018

Are Prospective Students About to Disappear?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed

New book says most colleges — and the vast majority of nonelite institutions — are about to face severe shortage of potential students.  Yes, everyone in admissions knows that certain groups of students — those who graduate from good high schools and have parents able to pay a significant share or all of their tuition and other college expenses — are shrinking in number. And the situation is more severe in the Northeast and Midwest, where populations are shrinking, than in other parts of the country. Those demographic realities, known for years, have led colleges to adjust strategies: new programs to attract adult students. Online education. More outreach to parts of the country where the population is growing. Attracting full-pay international students. Some combination of those and other ideas will work for most institutions, enrollment professionals have said. But what if they are wrong? What if the demographics are about to get much worse for higher education than the experts have expected?

https://www.insidehighered.com/admissions/article/2018/01/08/new-book-argues-most-colleges-are-about-face-significant-decline

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Small College Struggles in the Sights

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

by Rick Seltzer, Inside Higher Ed

Heightened concern about liberal arts institutions is reflected in presidents’ outlooks and an institute program. Numerous presidents at the institute agreed that they see an increased urgency among their peers interested in exploring significant changes in order to stabilize their colleges’ standing or seek long-term viability. In a few cases, presidents pointed to a confluence of trends causing them to reconsider doing business as usual, such as a declining number of traditional high school graduates in their regions, increased financial pressures, stiffer competition from public institutions or the free public college movement. More often, presidents reported having long been aware of headwinds. But their Boards of Trustees, alumni and faculty members have recently become more open to making significant changes, they said.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/01/08/cic-presidents-institute-increases-focus-solutions-struggling-colleges

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Survey: Students sing praises for digital learning tech #elearning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News.
Students said they vastly prefer classes with digital learning technologies.   Ninety-four percent of students in a new survey said digital learning technologies have helped them retain new concepts, and 53 percent said they prefer classes that use such tools. McGraw-Hill Education’s fourth annual Digital Study Trends Survey, compiled by Hanover Research, includes responses from more than 1,000 college students. Sixty percent of surveyed students said they think digital learning technologies have improved their grades, and one-fifth said those technologies significantly improved their grades. Students in STEM majors were the most likely to say technology has positively impacted their grades. Approximately 60 percent of students agree that digital learning technology increased their engagement with course materials.

Survey: Students sing praises for digital learning tech

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