Online Learning Update

November 14, 2018

Creating educational pathways for development professionals

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Michael M. Crow, Devez

For the first time in history, technological advances in online educational delivery and personalized learning have made cost-effective, high-scale teaching and learning possible, creating the opportunity for democratic and inclusive educational pathways. We can usher in an era of universal learning that serves learners from all socioeconomic backgrounds, at every stage of work and learning, with educational, training, and skill-building opportunities. Through novel institutional models and partnerships that effectively apply new technologies in teaching and learning, we can not only democratize education globally, but also dramatically enhance the effectiveness of development practitioners in emerging countries.

https://www.devex.com/news/sponsored/opinion-creating-educational-pathways-for-development-professionals-93393

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The Rise of AI and Employment: How Jobs Will Change to Adapt

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By John Loeffler

There is no doubt the rise of AI will affect the employment sector. We take a look at which jobs are the most vulnerable, which are the most resistant and which engineering jobs may even thrive.  According to the World Economic Forum’s The Future Of Jobs Report, within the next five years alone, a majority of companies expect to scale back their full-time workforce to make room for automation. The chief economist for the Bank of England predicted that there might be as many as 80 million jobs automated in the US alone. With fully half of all workplace tasks being performed via automation within the next decade, some jobs are more susceptible to this shift than others.

https://interestingengineering.com/the-rise-of-ai-and-employment-how-jobs-will-change-to-adapt

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Ignore AI Fear Factor at Your Peril: A Futurist’s Call for ‘Digital Ethics’

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by Doug Black, Enterprise Tech

This time, AI isn’t fooling around. This time, AI is in earnest, and so are its related technologies: robotics, 3-D printing, genomics, machine/deep learning, man-machine interface, IoT, HPC at the edge, quantum – the gamut of new data-driven technologies. In decades past, AI has gotten off to hyped false starts, but not this time, the building blocks are in place for the convergence of data-driven power evolving toward an AI supernova that will bring with it profound changes to human existence over the decades to come. With this expectation has come serious thinking – and worrying – about AI’s potential negative impacts. Naturally, AI investors and developers are going full speed ahead while airily dismissing AI fear as generally baseless. Rarely from within the industry do we hear voices – Elon Musk’s is an exception – calling for controls on AI.

 

https://www.enterprisetech.com/2018/11/03/ignore-the-ai-fear-factor-at-your-peril-a-futurists-call-for-digital-ethics/

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November 13, 2018

U of T Libraries hires first Wikipedian in Residence

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by ILYA BAÑARES, the Star

Alex Jung, an MA candidate in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto, is the institution’s first Wikipedian in Residence. It’s a new role. “The purpose behind the position, ultimately, is to go where our community is,” said Jesse Carliner, Communications Librarian. “Everybody, whether they admit to it or not, uses Wikipedia as a starting point for their research if they don’t know anything about a topic.”

https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2018/11/01/u-of-t-libraries-hires-first-wikipedian-in-residence.html

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20 unique courses and programs in global development

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By Lottie Watters, DevEX
From university degrees to specialized online courses, there are many ways to learn new skills and enhance your knowledge in particular fields of development.  The Humanitarian Leadership Academy, for example, offers 350 free courses in up to 10 languages online, as well as in-person workshops to teach people how to prepare for and respond to crises in their own countries. Another online option is the SickKids Public Health Nutrition Course, which is designed for health professionals looking at nutrition-related health challenges, particularly in low-resource settings, with contributors from Harvard Medical School and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. University College London has several online short courses, such as development and planning in African cities.

https://www.devex.com/news/sign-me-up-20-unique-courses-and-programs-in-global-development-93709

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Sandel Talks Civic Education and Online Learning at Ed School Forum

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Sam E. Sharfstein and Connor J. Wagaman, Harvard Crimson

Government Professor Michael J. Sandel spoke about the importance of civic education Thursday evening at a talk titled “Civic Education Goes Global.” Sandel, a pioneer of and advocate for “massive open online courses,” highlighted the importance of creating a global community of respectful discourse through education.  In the discussion, Sandel said his goal is “to take the distance out of distance learning” and to replicate an engaging classroom experience for online learners.

https://www.thecrimson.com/article/2018/11/2/ed-school-sandel-talk/

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November 12, 2018

Artificial Intelligence Is Not A Technology

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:09 am

Kathleen Walch, Forbes

Artificial intelligence is not a technology. Asking the question whether or not some particular technology is or isn’t AI is missing the point. Artificial intelligence is the journey. It’s the quest for the intelligent machine. All the technologies we’ve developed on the route to that quest are things that are individually useful, but all together, have not yet gotten us to the goal. This is why it’s important to understand that artificial intelligence is not a technology, in much the same way that the Space Race is not a technology.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/cognitiveworld/2018/11/01/artificial-intelligence-is-not-a-technology/#2bec67d45dcb

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Colleges Grapple With Teaching the Technology and Ethics of A.I.

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Alina Tugend, NY Times

David Danks, a professor of philosophy and psychology at Carnegie Mellon, just started teaching a class, “A.I, Society and Humanity.” The class is an outgrowth of faculty coming together over the past three years to create shared research projects, he said, because students need to learn from both those who are trained in the technology and those who are trained in asking ethical questions. “The key is to make sure they have the opportunities to really explore the ways technology can have an impact — to think how this will affect people in poorer communities or how it can be abused,” he said.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/02/education/learning/colleges-grapple-with-teaching-ai.html

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Why Higher Education Needs More Chief Innovation Officers

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

Only a quarter of top higher education schools across the country have established Chief Innovation Officer roles, which may leave you wondering if colleges and universities need CIOs. his senior leadership position not only works closely with the university president but must also reach out to all the departments at the campus to foster collaboration, collegiality, and innovation. These outreach activities can include encouraging incubators, identifying funding opportunities for research and scholarship promoting discoveries, and improving the culture and rapport between departments. The Chief Innovation Officer is integral to overall university success by assisting with funding, building collaboration, and promoting innovation.

https://www.thetechedvocate.org/why-higher-education-needs-more-chief-innovation-officers/

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November 11, 2018

Robots Won’t Replace Instructors, 2 Penn State Educators Argue. Instead, They’ll Help Them Be ‘More Human.’

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Tina Nazerian, EdSurge

One way professors can use artificial intelligence is to help find new materials to add to their lessons, said Bowen. An instructor can type in a concept or idea, such as “industrial design,” into the tool his team built, called Eureka!, which acts like a recommendation engine. Eureka! uses Wikipedia as a source of information. Once the tool generates results, the instructor can identify which ones are most like what he means by “industrial design” or whichever term he used. Eureka! will then use that information to refine the definition of that original term.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-11-01-robots-won-t-replace-instructors-2-penn-state-educators-argue-instead-they-ll-help-them-be-more-human

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2019 promises to be a big year of technology trends

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News

2019’s trends will be all about building the “Intelligent Digital Mesh,” which David Cearley, vice president and Gartner Fellow, says has been a consistent theme in recent years.

That intelligent digital mesh focuses on three things:
1. Intelligence: AI drives everything we do across many systems going into the future
2. Digital: The digital world brings the virtual and real worlds together in a new digital reality
3. Mesh: Connecting people, processes, and things together in new and interesting ways

The convergence of these three things supports a continuous innovation process.

https://www.ecampusnews.com/2018/11/01/2019-promises-to-be-a-big-year-of-technology-trends/

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7 Ways to Reduce the Cost of an Online Degree

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By Jordan Friedman, US News

An online degree program can be a big investment. Luckily for 37-year-old northern Virginia resident Grant Clough, his employer offers workers $8,000 per year toward tuition reimbursement for those who choose to continue their education. Clough, director of talent acquisition at AARP, initially considered an MBA program, possibly on campus. But he ultimately decided against pursuing another business degree, in part because he studied accounting as an undergraduate. He then came across the online Master of Studies in Law at Wake Forest University, and it turned out that his employer would be covering nearly all his tuition. With the online format, he would also have more flexibility to study around his schedule.

https://www.usnews.com/higher-education/online-education/articles/2018-11-01/7-ways-to-reduce-the-cost-of-an-online-degree

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November 10, 2018

The Beginning of a New Era in the Online Degree Market

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Sean Gallagher, EdSurge

Today, more than three million students pursue higher education fully online, representing a $20-billion market. While online students are still only about 15 percent of all higher education enrollment in the U.S., it’s an area that is likely to continue to grow and make up a larger piece of the overall pie, given growing interest from students, more offerings from colleges, and increasing acceptance by employers. However, as the online degree market reaches a state of maturity, it is entering an entirely new era in its evolution – an era characterized by a changing competitive landscape, new technological developments and consumer preferences, and growing overlap with non-degree learning.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-10-30-the-beginning-of-a-new-era-in-the-online-degree-market

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Why Today’s Professionals Are Taking The Career Road Less Traveled

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

Anant Agarwal, Forbes

edX research found that 29% of Americans ages 25 to 44 have completely changed fields since starting their first job post-college. Zig-zagging is not a phenomenon restricted to new grads, however, and while another study from Deloitte found that 43% of millennials plan to quit their current job within two years, a report from the Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) recently cited by JP Morgan Chase & Co. found that job hopping, across all fields and titles, has become a widely accepted characteristic of the modern workforce.

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/anantagarwal/2018/10/31/why-todays-professionals-are-taking-the-career-road-less-traveled/#6f8bef41466b

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The future of work won’t be about college degrees, it will be about job skills

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by Stephane Kasriel, CNBC
According to the survey Freelancing in America 2018, released Wednesday, 93 percent of college-educated freelancers say their skill training is more useful in the work they are doing now than their college training.
Sixty-five percent of children entering primary school will end up in jobs that don’t yet exist, reveals the World Economic Forum. The result is a proliferation of new, nontraditional education options.

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/10/31/the-future-of-work-wont-be-about-degrees-it-will-be-about-skills.html

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November 9, 2018

A Survey I’d Like to See: A different question on OER.

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Matt Reed, Inside Higher Ed

There’s plenty to chew on in the latest IHE poll about college faculty attitudes about technology, OER, and assessment. (Least surprising finding: skepticism about assessment remains strong.) But at least in the OER section, it strikes me that we need to ask a different question. Anecdotally, several faculty here who’ve adopted OER for their classes have reported pleasant surprise at finding that more students actually do the reading.  That tends to result in better class discussions, for obvious reasons, as well as better student performance on tests and papers. They reported that the difference stems mostly from two factors, one obvious and one surprising.  The obvious one was the elimination of cost as a barrier. The surprising one, at least for me, was that having everything in easy electronic form — without any DRM hampering access, and sufficiently platform-agnostic that it could be read on almost any device — made it easier for students to sneak a couple of minutes of reading at a time at work.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/confessions-community-college-dean/survey-i%E2%80%99d-see

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Conflicted Views of Technology: A Survey of Faculty Attitudes

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By Doug Lederman, Inside Higher Ed

The proportion of college instructors who are teaching online and blended courses is growing. So is their support for using technology to deliver instruction. But their belief in the quality and effectiveness of online courses and digital technology isn’t keeping pace. Those are among the findings — conflicting and confounding, as is often the case — of Inside Higher Ed’s 2018 Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology, published today in partnership with Gallup. Among other highlights of the 2018 survey: Forty-four percent of instructors said they had taught an online course, up from 42 percent last year and 30 percent in 2013. (Thirty-eight percent said they had taught a blended course.) Professors who have taught online overwhelmingly say the experience improved their teaching and made them more likely to experiment with new approaches.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/survey/survey-faculty-views-technology-explores-online-teaching-oer-assessment

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5 Mistakes that Higher Education Administrators Make with Technology

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

While many people might imagine that most school technology mistakes are made by professors, they forget the importance of higher education administrators. These professionals set the tone for the entire school and lead by example. It’s imperative that they understand how to implement technology properly, but many of them still make some common mistakes. Take a look at these top five mistakes that higher education administrators are making with technology.

5 Mistakes that Higher Education Administrators Make with Technology

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November 8, 2018

REIMAGINING THE HIGHER EDUCATION ECOSYSTEM–WITH A LOT OF HELP FROM PRIVATE BUSINESS

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Cait Etherington, eLearning Inside

Technology is rapidly transforming how we live, learn, and work. With automation, new jobs are emerging while others are disappearing. But to date, higher education has largely failed to rise to the challenge. As stated on the Office of Educational Technology’s website, “The changes ahead are likely to hurt most those who can least afford to manage them: low-income and first generation learners already ill-served by our existing postsecondary education system. We must work together now to ensure that we have an educational ecosystem flexible enough to help all people live purposeful and economically stable lives.” And this is precisely why the Reimagining the Higher Education Ecosystem Challenge was launched.

Reimagining the Higher Education Ecosystem–With a Lot of Help from Private Business

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Ten Successful Ways Institutions Around the World are Addressing the Challenge of Retention Rates in Online Learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

Teach Online Canada
Retention and completion in online learning programs and courses, especially in institutions which practice open admission, has long been a concern. The costs of non-completion – dropout, repeated renewals of learning contracts, course repeats – are expensive for both learners and institutions. A recent study of non-completion in college and university undergraduate level studies in the United States (US) suggests the costs of each non-completing learner can be as high as US$40,000 – taking into account recruitment, student service and support, tuition and related costs. Less than 50% of those who registered in a program of study in the US – whether two- or four-year, face-to-face or online – completed within six years of beginning their studies.

https://teachonline.ca/tools-trends/ten-successful-ways-institutions-around-world-are-addressing-challenge-retention-rates-online

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5 Mistakes that Professors Make with Technology

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

Implementing technology in the classroom can be a real learning process even for professors at the higher education level. It can lead to a lot of frustration and misuse of the devices, particularly when professors aren’t well trained. As a result, lots of mistakes might be made with the new technology that can significantly impact students. Here are five of the mistakes that professors most often make when it comes to the use of new technology.

5 Mistakes that Professors Make with Technology

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