Personalizing Instruction With 1-to-1 and Blended Learning

August 23rd, 2014

By Dan Gordon, THE Journal

We determined that there are seven characteristics of the ideal blended learning classroom. The first two are community mindset and the learning environment: creating a culture in your classroom and then organizing the physical environment to support and encourage that culture. It’s about student choice and voice, empowering students and giving them the opportunities to help drive some of the decisions and the learning. The next two involve instruction and student work, with the focus being on how we can use traditional and digital methods to provide content and resources, and how the students show what they know and understand from the learning. The next is assessment: how we understand where students are and where we need to go with them, and how we personalize learning so that it plays to students’ strengths and meets their needs. And finally, communication and collaboration: how we can use these technology tools to work together toward better outcomes.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/08/18/personalizing-instruction-with-1-to-1-and-blended-learning.aspx

Share on Facebook

Technology Education for Students Is Essential in Creating a Future STEM Workforce

August 23rd, 2014

by Felix W. Ortiz III, Huffington Post

Digital device learning, often called 1-to-1 computing or a “smart classroom,” is not some faraway abstraction or revolutionary concept in education. In fact, thanks to grants and state-subsidized funding, an increasing number of school districts nationwide are securing electronic devices such as personal computers, remote accessible software and even handheld tablets for their students from such electronic giants as Hewlett-Packard and Lenovo. Proponents for digital device learning assert that greater access to advancing technology within the education system allows teachers to more fluidly support and satisfy Common Core state standards through engaging digital curriculum, interactive supports and assessments, and an enhanced learning environment for their students.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/felix-w-ortiz-iii/technology-education-for-_b_5682916.html?utm_hp_ref=education&ir=Education

Share on Facebook

Online education programs offer alternative for students, savings for districts

August 23rd, 2014

BY BRITNEY MILAZZO, Centre Daily Times

The program is entering its sixth year and was started to enhance learning and compete with other cybercharter schools. It’s grown from 10 students in its first year to about 25 students this year, Garman said. All school districts in Centre County have such programs, and in addition to offering an alternative to students, they save the districts thousands of dollars annually by recruiting students to district online programs instead of paying for them to attend Pennsylvania Cyber Charter School, or PA Cyber. “The initial expectation was to save money and bring back students from” PA Cyber,” said Brian Griffith, Penns Valley Area School District superintendent.“We weren’t sure if it would really work, but it was an option that would develop a different way of teaching our students and save us money. What we found is it is working and students are coming back.”

http://www.centredaily.com/2014/08/16/4308794/online-education-programs-offer.html?sp=/99/116/

Share on Facebook

5 important YouTube videos for IT

August 22nd, 2014

By Michael Sharnoff, eCampus News

These five YouTube videos explain the important role IT plays in higher ed and how their services can improve the university experience. IT plays an integral role in the university experience. However, in our rapidly changing and interconnected world, what resources, tools, and strategies do IT personnel need to stay ahead? How will IT adapt and grow in the evolving ed-tech landscape? Take a look at the five YouTube resources linked below for admins on technology and innovation in education.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/youtube-videos-it-492/

Share on Facebook

This is the ‘top concern’ for students on campus

August 22nd, 2014

By Denny Carter, eCampusNews

A bogged down campus network could be an insurmountable competitive disadvantage for colleges and universities as they compete for prospective students. Six in 10 college students identified a “slow” campus network connection as a “top concern” in a recent survey commissioned by Ipswitch, a Massachusetts-based company that specializes in network management solutions. Half of student respondents said accessibility issues were their primary concern, while 36 percent pointed to security as their top concern. Half of campuses said the money spent on satiating students’ broadband needs for their laptops, smart phones, tablet computers, and video game consoles is never recovered through tuition or student fees.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/students-network-278/

Share on Facebook

How to minimize digital classroom distractions

August 22nd, 2014

By Kyle Albert, eSchool News

Classroom technologies such as smartphones, tablets, computers, and wireless internet access offer exciting opportunities to enhance and deepen the learning process. However, using technology in the classroom can also bring multiple distractions to students. As pointed out by Tom Daccord on Edudemic, when “the activity is engaging and challenging, there is an authentic audience, and prescribed time limits, students won’t mess around.” Design your lessons by ensuring that the length and intensity of your discussion are appropriate to the range of your students’ attention spans. In case of seventh grade students, Education World noted that they can only tolerate up to 30 minutes of continuous lecture. Any additional time should be dedicated to lively group activities.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2014/08/14/digital-classroom-distraction-043/

Share on Facebook

Are We Addicted to Technology?

August 21st, 2014

by Amy Borovoy, Edutopia

It’s the age of mobile. According to Pew Research Internet Project, over 90 percent of American adults own a cellphone, and 73 percent of American adults online use a social networking site of some kind. Research from software analytics company New Relic supposedly found that Americans check their devices an average of 150 times a day. But scores of articles about “tech anxiety” and “tech addiction” make it abundantly clear that our relationship with technology is very complicated. As educators, it’s worth thinking about how our devices are changing the way we interact with each other. Many of the videos I’ve gathered below are just for fun, to give us a laugh about our technological foibles, but they can also be conversation starters about how technology saturation affects our lives.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/film-festival-technology-addiction-videos

Share on Facebook

10+ Tools To Bring Robotics (And Other Real Objects) Into Your Classroom

August 21st, 2014

By Jason Cross, Edudemic

While tablet computers in the classroom are wonderful tools, they still have not reached the level of intuitive use that we often feel as we interact with our analog world. As an example, there are lots of pictures of the moon that we can look up using our web browser, but seeing it first hand through a telescope offers a different level of engagement. In the classroom, we often need our analog world to interact with our digital devices.

http://www.edudemic.com/bringing-real-world-digital-classroom-tools/

Share on Facebook

How Google Glass Is Being Used In Classrooms Around The World

August 21st, 2014

By eduglasses, Edudemic

I’ve been lucky to be a member of the Google Glass Explorer Program for the past year. I was excited to learn about how this technology could be advanced in terms of education and everyday activities… however it never dawned on me how much potential it truly had until I began the Explorer Program. Over the past year using Glass in class I have began to see the potential not only in education, but also for the everyday consumer. Right now Google glass is expensive and limited among education and consumers…but it is a technology that is moving towards being more cost efficient for all users. (Cost to Build Google Glass) This is why, as educators, we need to take a more in depth look at how this technology will reform education as a whole.

http://www.edudemic.com/google-glass-classrooms/

Share on Facebook

Online Evolution

August 20th, 2014

by Harvard Magazine

HarvardX and other institutions continue to create new massive open online courses (MOOCs; see the current list at harvardx.harvard.edu/modules-courses). But with hundreds of offerings available on edX, Coursera, and emerging platforms (such as the Business School’s HBX; see harvardmag.com/hbx-14), emphasis is now shifting to research on applications and assessments.

http://harvardmagazine.com/2014/09/online-evolution

Share on Facebook

Rising Confidence in Online Higher Ed

August 20th, 2014

By Timothy Zimmer, Forbes

Online higher education is steadily gaining favor as a credible alternative to the traditional classroom. According to a recent Gallup report, more U.S. adults agree or strongly agree that online colleges and universities offer high-quality education (37 percent) than did so in 2012 (33 percent) or 2011 (30 percent) when Gallup first introduced the report. Online higher education has been a divisive issue amongst academics for years, seen by many as convenient and affordable but unremarkable in value and legitimacy. When online education went toe-to-toe with traditional classroom-based learning in another recent Gallup report, Americans considered online better at “providing a wide range of options for curriculum” and offering “good value for the money.” Traditional education overshadowed this accomplishment, however, besting online in areas such as instruction, rigor, employer favorability, and student format.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/ccap/2014/08/13/rising-confidence-in-online-higher-ed/

Share on Facebook

Online K-12 education faces challenges

August 20th, 2014

by Norman Rozenberg, Tech Page One

Kindergarten-through-12th grade (K-12) cyber schools have yet to receive as much attention as online higher education. For example, brick-and-mortar grade schools have largely resisted the kinds of online options traditional universities have adopted. There are problems with cyber schools that must be addressed, however. Many cyber-schooling programs have not provided students with an education that meets national averages, according to the University of Colorado study. Despite these drawbacks, the virtual option can become a viable alternative to brick-and-mortar grade schools, especially when targeted to specific groups of students for whom traditional schooling is not helpful.

http://techpageone.dell.com/technology/virtualization/online-k-12-education-faces-challenges/

Share on Facebook

Google Penetrates The E-Learning Market To Expand Chromebook Sales

August 19th, 2014

by Lior Ronen, Seeking Alpha

The e-learning market grows rapidly worldwide and expected to reach $51B total revenues in 2016. Google introduced an e-learning platform that integrate its services into one suite that is targeted to the education sector. By penetrating the e-learning market, Google tries to increase Chromebook sales and expand its PC ecosystem. Google could use the e-learning trend around the world and expand its Chromebook sales and ecosystem presence globally.

http://seekingalpha.com/article/2423025-google-penetrates-the-e-learning-market-to-expand-chromebook-sales

Share on Facebook

Diverse Conversations: Is Higher Education Worth It?

August 19th, 2014
by Matthew Lynch, Huffington Post
Speaking with Yvonne Tocquigny who is CEO of Tocquigny, a company that specializes in brand management and development for colleges and universities.  “Online learning and MOOCS will provide innovative ways for schools to cut costs by curbing the cost of labor (the #1 cost for most schools) and amortizing their investment in the best teachers. This will have to be balanced with the need to continue to convince students that the value of an online course from their school is somehow superior to that of a less expensive institution. Many people believe that in a few years, one will be able to acquire online learning through Amazon. So schools will have to do more over time to define the value of a degree from their particular school. They will have to become more efficient at attracting the right students to their school.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/matthew-lynch-edd/diverse-conversations-is_b_5678055.html

Share on Facebook

Parents with kids playing hockey now required to take online course in respect

August 19th, 2014

by Meghan Roberts, CTV Winnipeg

Parents looking to register their kids for hockey in Winnipeg this fall must now complete the Respect in Sports program. The plan for the requirement was announced earlier this year. The online course costs $12 and takes about an hour to complete. One parent per household is required to finish the program. Hockey Winnipeg said the course will be good for five years.

http://winnipeg.ctvnews.ca/parents-with-kids-playing-hockey-now-required-to-take-online-course-in-respect-1.1954995

Share on Facebook

Fla. students required to take online class to graduate

August 18th, 2014

By Leigh Spann, WFLA

In 2011, the Florida Legislature passed the Digital Learning Act requiring students to complete one online course in order to graduate. At that time, high school sophomores, juniors and seniors were grandfathered out of the stipulation. This year’s rising seniors are the first that must graduate with a virtual course. Many haven’t yet. “That’s what we hear statistically from around our districts, 30 percent,” said Celeste Sanchez, District Relations Manager Florida Virtual School. Kelley Brenes is a rising junior at Sickles High School in Tampa. She may be two years from graduating, but she’s fulfilling the online class requirement right now.

http://www.wfla.com/story/26247954/students-need-online-class-to-graduate-many-havent-taken

Share on Facebook

Back to School Anything but Routine for Alaska Virtual Academy Students

August 18th, 2014

By Marketwatch

New school supplies and meeting new teachers are still part of the first day of school for Alaska Virtual Academy (AKVA) students across the state. They’ll meet each other in homeroom and catch up with classmates from last year, but there won’t be any backpacks, school cafeteria food or catching the bus for these students, who go to school full-time online. Instead, they’ll be learning how to log on, manage their homework and meet their assigned teacher as they learn from home. AKVA is a tuition-free, online public school, available to students in grades K-8 across the state of Alaska. Students attend school full-time online, and use the internet to access the engaging, award-winning K¹² curriculum. A public school choice, AKVA gives parents and families the opportunity to maximize their success with individualized learning.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/back-to-school-anything-but-routine-for-alaska-virtual-academy-students-2014-08-12

Share on Facebook

Canvas Network Announces Minecraft MOOCs and App in a Suite of 15 MOOCs

August 18th, 2014

by Kim Sun-Mi, Korea Times

Learning technology company Instructure, the creator of the Canvas learning management system for K-12 and higher education, today announced a major new experiment in K-12 learning by unveiling a suite of more than 15 MOOCs for teachers, students and even parents on its Canvas Network platform. The most ambitious collection of K-12 MOOCs to date, the suite includes two Minecraft MOOCs that aim to help teachers leverage gamification best practices in the classroom. Enrollment is free and open for registration for anyone in the world at canvas.net

http://www.koreaittimes.com/story/39940/canvas-network-announces-minecraft-moocs-and-app-suite-15-moocs-k-12-teachers-students-a

Share on Facebook

It’s Time to End the Device Debate

August 17th, 2014

By Patrick Larkin, Edudemic

Personally, I have no strong emotion tied to one device or another. In fact, as a learner, I get a great deal of satisfaction by figuring out how I can get my daily tasks done on any device that is placed before me. In fact, my main takeaway from most of these debates regarding one device or another is that those of us in schools need to steer clear of strapping on the blinders that can come along with one platform or another. We need to ensure environments that are adaptable and allow learners to accomplish their tasks with whatever devices are available. For all intensive purposes, devices are now basically disposables after two to three years. It is time to dispose of the debate on devices as well.

http://www.edudemic.com/time-end-device-debate/

Share on Facebook

Is This The Future Of Education?

August 17th, 2014

By Katie Lepi, Edudemic

It seems to be part of the human condition that we are constantly looking to the future. From things a simple as “what’s happening this weekend” to “are we going to have flying cars in ten years”, wondering, imagining, and creating what our future will look like is so normal that it can often seem like it is just a part of our subconscious. In education, we’re always looking to the future. What can we improve? How can we change, add, or manage our toolkits to do exactly what we need? What skills will students need in the future, and how can we ensure we’re preparing them adequately? What technologies will they be using? The handy infographic below takes a look at the ‘education of tomorrow’. It showcases a few statistics on technology growth over the years along with an overview of what might be next for the future of education.

http://www.edudemic.com/future-of-education/

Share on Facebook

Brain-inspired chip fits 1m ‘neurons’ on postage stamp

August 17th, 2014

By Jonathan Webb, BBC

Scientists have produced a new computer chip that mimics the organisation of the brain, and squeezed in one million computational units called “neurons”. They describe it as a supercomputer the size of a postage stamp. Each neuron on the chip connects to 256 others, and together they can pick out the key features in a visual scene in real time, using very little power. The design is the result of a long-running collaboration, led by IBM, and is published in the journal Science.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-28688781

Share on Facebook