What will learning look like in the future?

August 22nd, 2015

by Duncan Brown and James Cory-Wright, Training Zone

When smartphones and tablets become one:  the use of apps to deliver the training of the future suggests that as well as overcoming possible cost barriers, old attitudes and connectivity issues, objections around screen size will also go away. The smartphone screen is too small for training content whether that’s presented as text and graphics or video but the screen size of the smartphone is still unfinished business. It’s on an upward trend and getting closer to the screen size of the smaller tablets – like the ‘phablet’ which is a smartphone with a screen that’s ‘an intermediate size between that of a typical smartphone and a tablet computer.’ So will the two fully converge and become one to the point where smartphones become the main device for consuming online training? It remains to be seen but at the moment it looks like a distinct possibility and one that may be adopted for just the kind of applications we’ve been examining.

http://www.trainingzone.co.uk/feature/technology/what-will-learning-look-future-pt2/189095

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Defining College Affordability

August 22nd, 2015

By Doug Lederman, Inside Higher Ed

What does “affordable” even mean? And if politicians, policy makers and the public don’t have a shared understanding of what families should pay for college, can we really expect them to develop and agree on what to do about the problem. Officials at Lumina Foundation don’t think so, which is why they are offering up a simple (and, they admit, somewhat simplistic) framework for concretely defining what is reasonable for the typical college student and her/his family to pay for college.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2015/08/19/what-does-it-mean-college-be-affordable-heres-one-answer

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Connecticut Public Broadcasting Network Strives for Sustainable Classroom Engagement

August 22nd, 2015

by Education World

Matt Lin, currently enrolled in UCONN’s Teacher Certification Program for College Graduates, will be student teaching 10th grade at the Academy of Engineering and Green Technology in Hartford this fall. Having previously worked with students at the middle school level in Bristol and West Hartford as a science teacher during the summer, he went to the forum to gain perspective on utilizing resources that better align to student interests and attention spans. He’s always had a love for multimedia, and thinks that its utilization is one of the most effective tools in spurring engagement. He was, like many of the attendees, very excited to share and learn. “Unfortunately, it’s very difficult in a modern technology environment to, kind of, keep their attention there,” said Lin, noting that cool features can be just as distracting as they are motivating to students while using EdTech.

http://www.educationworld.com/a_news/connecticut-public-broadcasting-network-strives-sustainable-classroom-engagement-2067787010

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Information Technology: The Accidental Career for Ph.D.s

August 21st, 2015

By Joshua B. Gross, Chronicle of Higher Ed

The United States has two major employment dilemmas. On the supply side, American universities produce a well-documented surfeit of Ph.D.s, far in excess of the number of tenure-track job openings. On the demand side, the American information-technology industry is greatly in need of skilled workers. But there has yet to be a move to direct Ph.D.s into IT careers in large numbers. We need to change that, and to encourage Ph.D.s — especially those in the humanities and social sciences — to pursue technology-related careers.

http://chronicle.com/article/Information-Technology-The/231955/

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‘Flipped’ Classroom Has Kids Do Homework At School After Watching Online Videos

August 21st, 2015

By Liam Casey, The Canadian Press

As Canadian kids prepare to head back to school, there’s a growing movement gaining traction across the country that involves students learning their lessons at home and doing their homework at school. It’s called the “flipped classroom” — students watch an online video of a lesson as homework, and then work on problems during class time. The method is becoming more prominent as technology in schools allows for videos to be accessed easily, either on custom-made sites, on YouTube or downloaded to a device.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/08/16/flipped-classroom-sees-kids-do-homework-at-school-after-watching-online-videos_n_7994798.html

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Online Courses Are For The Next Generation

August 21st, 2015

by Dhanur Chauhan, Exam and Interview Tips

Everybody is struggling with the economy and that’s why people are taking interest in online courses. People can take the degree of any alternative field with the help of online education. They can grow their career by taking degrees in their respective areas. There are many benefits of online education and degree from any online institute will be same as the degree from any regular institute or college. This is cost effective as you can study while sitting in homes or in offices. Most study material is available on internet which you can download for your studies, so no need to buy books or workbooks which are really expensive. If we talk about the stress level for student who is taking online classes, it is very low. You can study alone whenever you want so no need to compete with each other and make your life more stressful.

http://www.examandinterviewtips.com/2015/08/online-courses-are-for-next-generation.html

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Tracking Students to Improve Tutoring and Support

August 20th, 2015

By David Raths, Campus Technology

At South Mountain Community College, a homegrown Learner Support System gathers data on students’ usage of campus resources, streamlining the tutoring process and improving outcomes. With input from several areas of campus, the design team, led by programmer analyst Alan Ziv, created a Web-based application called the Learner Support System (LSS) that tracks students’ usage of campus resources as well as key academic details such as with whom a student worked, how long he or she spent with a tutor, what the focus of the tutoring session was and how effective it was perceived to be. The system provides data at the individual student, course and program level to help inform institutional strategic planning and resource development.

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/08/12/tracking-students-to-improve-tutoring-and-support.aspx

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10 Emerging Education Technologies

August 20th, 2015

By Pamela DeLoatch, Edudemic

Are you or your students wearing your Apple Watches to school, and if so, are you using them as part of your curriculum? What about the use of digital textbooks, adaptive learning, collaboration with other schools or flipped classrooms? These technologies represent some of the cutting edge tools and trends in education. While some are being implemented now, regular use of others is on the (not to distant) horizon. We’ve scanned the gurus’ lists and found the top technologies that educators need to prepare for in the next one to five years.

http://www.edudemic.com/10-emerging-education-technologies/

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Can Innovation Be Taught?

August 20th, 2015

by Nick Donofrio, Ed Tech

Fostering skills beyond the classroom setting is just as important as studying theories. “Driving the skills agenda,” a May 2015 report published by The Economist Intelligence Unit, cited 49 percent of teachers who said current curriculum was too rigid to allow time for wider skills to be cultivated. Instead, students tend to participate in internships for a true taste of the working world. While that supplements student studies, the experience is often too brief to provide a fulfilling environment to harbor creativity and innovation. Equally important, training educators ensures that they are up to speed on the latest educational developments and technological advances. While technology continues to influence education in all fields, educators have a tough time keeping up with it. According to The Economist survey, 85 percent of teachers report that advances in technology influence the way they teach.

http://www.edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2015/08/can-innovation-be-taught

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Pittsburgh adopts online badges to reward summer learning

August 19th, 2015

By Kate Schimel, Education Dive

In Pittsburgh, a program called the Pittsburgh City of Learning is giving students digital badges for completing summer educational opportunities. The initiative is a collaboration among a group of nonprofits and city organizations to help give students proof of what they learned over the summer for potential employers or universities. Students get badges for mastering skills and store them in an online portfolio, which can be shared publicly.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/pittsburgh-adopts-online-badges-to-reward-summer-learning/403987/

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Exams for online courses? The library does it

August 19th, 2015

By Mary Rindfleisch, Ridgefield Press

Due to the huge growth in distance learning all around the world, many more students of all ages are earning degrees and certificates without ever setting foot on campus. But they often do still need a secured and supervised setting for taking exams. That’s where the Ridgefield Library comes in. We have long done proctoring for exams on an ad hoc basis, but the increase in demand has prompted us to establish a formal policy, and also a modest fee for this service. We are pleased to be able to support our patrons’ educational aspirations, but we want to make sure that the test-taking environment we provide conforms to the requirements of the institutions of higher learning involved. A $25 charge will now be assessed for each request for exam proctoring.

http://www.theridgefieldpress.com/49827/exams-for-online-courses-the-library-does-it/

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New Web courses make training more accessible to Scouting leaders

August 19th, 2015

By Gretchen Sparling, Scouting

Scouting U’s new online training courses will help volunteers learn what they need when they need it. Listening to feedback from volunteers, Scouting U redesigned its online training for adult leaders, making it more convenient than ever to earn your Trained badge. The new Web-based courses deliver high-quality online learning experiences tailored for each volunteer’s role.

http://scoutingmagazine.org/2015/08/new-web-courses-make-training-more-accessible-to-scouting-leaders/

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6 Questions to Ask About Faculty in an Online Graduate Engineering Program

August 18th, 2015

By Ian Quillen, US News

The life of an online engineering student isn’t that different from an on-ground one. Many online classes, heavily mathematical in nature, lend themselves easily to a live or archived lecture followed by a problem set students have to complete independently. Labs are sometimes more difficult to replicate online, but often students fulfill those with periodic campus visits. Because the course content translates easily, experts say, engineering schools have had a head start on making an online option available for students. But that doesn’t mean students should settle for programs that aren’t thoughtful about how to turn quality in-person instruction into an equally fulfilling virtual experience. Here are six questions to ask that may shed light on the quality of instruction in an online engineering graduate program.

http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/articles/2015/08/10/6-questions-to-ask-about-faculty-in-an-online-graduate-engineering-program

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Can online tutors make anytime, anywhere learning a reality?

August 18th, 2015

By Peter West, eSchool News

Recently, I began dubbing the current generation of students the “Netflix Generation.” They learn when they want, and expect learning resources to be available when and where they need them. This is similar to the way they consume media through streaming services such as Netflix (for movies and television series) and Spotify (for music). However, this now produces other pressures. Learning outside of traditional school hours does not remove the need for teachers. If all that students needed in order to learn was information, schools would have closed once Google and high-speed broadband arrived on the scene. Students continue to need support, a human explanation, encouragement to work through a problem, and insight to take them through a mental barrier to get to the next stage of problem solving. Yet if significant learning is happening outside traditional school hours, who is available to support it?

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/08/11/online-tutors-328/

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Documentation, communication key to online summer PE class

August 18th, 2015

by Grace Paine, Charlottesville Tomorrow

Does physical education need to take place in the school gym? According to staff and students at Charlottesville High School, the answer is “no.” Charlottesville High School recently wrapped up its second year of offering students the chance to fulfill their physical education credit by taking a virtual course over the summer. The program’s goal, administrators say, is to grant students greater flexibility in their schedules so that they can pursue individualized interests during the school year.

http://www.cvilletomorrow.org/news/article/21707-documentation-communication-key-to-online-pe/

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Inquiry-based science platform lets students conduct investigations

August 17th, 2015

by eSchool News

Van Andel Education Institute (VAEI) has launched a new scientific inquiry platform, called NexGen Inquiry — which guides students through the scientific method and lets them conduct investigations and journal their progress. Released in preparation for the 2015-16 school year, NexGen Inquiry includes an interactive teaching and learning platform that supports existing curriculum, integrated teacher professional development, a teacher community and a resource library. Built by teachers for teachers, NexGen Inquiry is the result of more than a decade of work with students and science educators at the Van Andel Education Institute Science Academy in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/08/10/inquiry-based-science-562/

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University moves to give students wireless power

August 17th, 2015

by eCampus News

Powermat Technologies is installing its wireless charging platform at California State University, San Bernardino (CSUSB), allowing students to charge their mobile phones so they can stay connected to the information and learning resources they need while on the go. CSUSB says it is the first university globally to offer wireless power on campus, and it will soon integrate Powermat technology into high-traffic common spaces, student union areas, study areas, and on campus cafes and restaurants. The second wave will then see broader implementation in the university’s library and classrooms.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/wireless-power-campus-784/

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Scientists Teach AI Machines To Understand Us

August 17th, 2015

by Vlad Tverdohleb, iTechPost

Artificial intelligence (AI) machines will be soon able to sustain a conversation with humans. This is one of the oldest goals in artificial intelligence and soon it might become a reality. Facebook has a chance to be the first company able to achieve this goal. According to Yann LeCun, the head of Facebook’s artificial intelligence lab, the company made progress in revolutionizing artificial intelligence research. After the recent successes in speech recognition and face recognition, now AI researchers are focusing their efforts on deep learning. This field has become a battleground between the high-tech giants, such as Google, Microsoft, IBM and Facebook, in their efforts to bring new AI applications on the consumer market.

http://www.itechpost.com/articles/15559/20150810/scientists-teach-ai-machines-to-understand-us.htm

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The 7 do’s and don’ts of creating your own OERs

August 16th, 2015

By Laura Devaney, eSchool News

Whether you know it or not, most educators have already started creating their own open educational resources (OER) in the form of tests, handouts, and presentations. Bringing them on online to share with other educators is just the natural next step. But there are best practices creating and sharing OERs, which are resources that are freely shared and able to be modified and redistributed. This “grass-roots, bottom-up” approach to content creation enables educators to tailor content to meet students’ needs,” said Tyler DeWitt, an MIT Ph.D. student and a student coordinator for the MIT+K12 video outreach project, during an edWeb webinar, which explored these and other related takeaways and gave several tips for creating OERs that work for educators.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/08/07/creating-oers-722/

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More Guilford students take advantage of online classes

August 16th, 2015

By Marquita Brown, Greensboro.com

More students in Guilford County are studying science, Spanish, SAT prep and other courses. But they’re doing it while getting more screen time than face time with a teacher. Such self-guided classrooms aren’t taking the place of the traditional classroom — at least not yet. They are an increasingly popular way for some students to get an edge on their peers. About 2,000 students have taken online classes in Guilford County Schools each year since 2012, when the system first started its virtual public school. Students don’t have to pay to take the classes.

http://www.greensboro.com/news/schools/more-guilford-students-take-advantage-of-online-classes/article_8be999c0-7963-5e90-bfdb-499cab704a32.html

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University Of Missouri Offers 10% Tuition Discount For Online Degree Programs

August 16th, 2015

by Hanna Sanchez, iSchool Guide

The University of Missouri has decided to offer a 10 percent discount on its online degree programs for the upcoming semester this fall. The tuition drop is an effort to lure more in-state students to take online courses. The University of Missouri is offering in-state students a tuition drop on its online degree program, Mizzou Online, this fall. The school said Missouri students will save 10 percent if they enroll online, which costs about $82.86 per course. To qualify, students also must have attended a public community college in the state and be working on a degree from an undergraduate distance program.

http://www.ischoolguide.com/articles/21236/20150807/university-missouri-10-tuition-discount-online-programs.htm

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