Techno-News Blog

October 28, 2020

Inter-Institutional Sharing of Courses Online

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Ray Schroeder, Inside Higher Education

A series of events has converged to put new impetus behind inter-institutional sharing of courses online. The COVID-19 pandemic, rapid deployment of remote learning, growth of MOOCs and mounting financial pressure on colleges and universities have combined to open minds on this topic. It is impossible to chronicle all of the course-sharing initiatives that are springing up almost daily around the world. As the pace of such sharing of courses and degrees across colleges in this time of COVID-19 is rapidly picking up speed, so also have the range of models among otherwise fierce recruitment competitors, who also happen to be affiliated universities.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/blogs/online-trending-now/inter-institutional-sharing-courses-online

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October 2020: Misinformation, Disinformation, Hoaxes, and Scams

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Jay Gallman, EDUCAUSE Review

Help campus community members learn how to identify misinformation and disinformation campaigns and avoid falling victim to online hoaxes and scams.

This post is part of a larger campaign designed to support privacy, security, and IT professionals as they develop or enhance their security awareness plans. The campaign is brought to you by the Awareness and Training Community Group sponsored by the EDUCAUSE Higher Education Information Security Council (HEISC). View the other monthly blog posts with ready-made content on the awareness campaigns resource page.

https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2020/10/october-2020-misinformation-disinformation-hoaxes-and-scams

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Professors adapt teaching styles to technology, online learning

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Hallie Everett, KState Collegian

Don Saucier, psychology professor, said for him, the most important aspect of teaching online is consistency. “Every class is going to have a rhythm, it’s going to have a structure to it,” Saucier said. “Every Monday morning, that’s when my lecture material goes out. Every Tuesday afternoon, I have the highlight session where they’re synchronous with me and I go over the things that are the most important, and I’ll handle their questions.”

https://www.kstatecollegian.com/2020/10/13/professors-adapt-teaching-styles-to-technology-online-learning/

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UI spent hundreds of thousands to upgrade Zoom, other online learning software

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Sabine Martin, Daily Iowan

The shift to primarily online courses has added extra expenses for the University of Iowa, as it works to upgrade software and provide online-learning tools for students tuning in from home. In the first week of classes at the UI in the fall semester, students, faculty, and staff logged 2,457,091 meeting minutes on Zoom. Communication Manager of the Office of the Chief Information Officer Nicole Dahya said September data shows that the UI has averaged 1.93 million minutes on Zoom per day because of an increased number of online courses. In February, UI Information Technology Services believed it had very clear plans about what kind of technology was necessary to run campus in the future. As COVID-19 cases rose, however, Chief Information Officer Steven Fleagle said the world turned upside down.

https://dailyiowan.com/2020/10/13/ui-spent-hundreds-of-thousands-to-upgrade-zoom-other-online-learning-software/

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October 27, 2020

Stop spending on bricks-and-mortar and start investing in online education

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David Ramadan, Richmond Times-Dispatch

Thus, there is a lesson to be learned from the COVID-19 crisis we’re living through: Online learning is here to stay at every educational level. But teaching the basics — classes required for freshmen and sophomores that are the building blocks of higher education — also is where online learning can shine. It also is evident that those who might prefer a blackboard have a long way to go. The days of a camera aimed at an overhead projector slide are more than just old school, and the idea that we’ll be able to capture and hold the attention of the TikTok generation with a barebones Zoom call isn’t going to get it.

https://richmond.com/opinion/columnists/david-ramadan-column-stop-spending-on-bricks-and-mortar-and-start-investing-in-online-education/article_2ee9c3e9-3cf7-5a56-91f6-f7dabbac2c1f.html

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The State of AI in Higher Education

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Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

Matthew Rascoff, associate vice provost for Digital Education and Innovation at Duke University, views the state of artificial intelligence in education as a proxy for the “promise and perils of ed tech writ large.” As he noted in a recent panel discussion during the 2020 ASU+GSV conference, “On the one hand, you see edX getting more engagement using machine learning-driven nudges in courses, which is pretty amazing. But on the other hand, we have all these concerns about surveillance, bias and privacy when it comes to AI-driven proctoring.”

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2020/10/09/the-state-of-ai-in-higher-education.aspx

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Call for proposals: Policy, Leadership and Organizational Change in Distance Education

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An upcoming special issue of The American Journal of Distance Education.  Are you conducting or have you recently completed research on leadership, institutional quality and policy, organizational transformation and/or governmental policies in online/eLearning/distance education? If so, please consider responding to a call for proposed articles for Policy, Leadership and Organizational Change in Distance Education, an upcoming special issue of The American Journal of Distance Education.

 
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October 26, 2020

Tutoring: A time-tested solution to an unprecedented pandemic

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Andre Nickow, Phillip Oreopoulos, and Vincent Quan, Brookings

When it comes to interventions that can help students get back on track, tutoring—defined here as one-on-one or small-group instructional programs—readily comes to mind. As educators will attest, tutoring ranks among the most widespread, versatile, and potentially transformative instruments within today’s educational toolkit. Long before the advent of the contemporary education system, scholars had instructed students individually and in small groups, with more formal tutoring interventions experiencing a renaissance in the mid-1980s. But what promise does tutoring hold in addressing today’s learning crisis?

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/brown-center-chalkboard/2020/10/06/tutoring-a-time-tested-solution-to-an-unprecedented-pandemic/

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How Technology Can Support Student Success during COVID-19

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Susan Grajek and D. Christopher Brooks, EDUCAUSE Review

The COVID-19 pandemic is prompting many colleges and universities to abruptly and comprehensively adopt online learning, remote work, and other activities to help contain the spread of the virus. In the past decade, institutions have recognized the importance of advising, early alerts, degree planning, and other services to help students attain their academic goals affordably and efficiently. A wide range of new applications and technologies to support student success are now available and may prove invaluable to help students adapt to fully remote learning. EDUCAUSE data from 2019 reveal that many, but far from all, institutions, students, faculty, and staff are ready and able to use these technologies during the pandemic.1

https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2020/3/how-technology-can-support-student-success-during-covid19

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Strapped for students, colleges finally begin to clear transfer logjam

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Jon Marcus, Hechinger Report

Much of the attention suddenly being paid to transfer students is in institutions’ self-interest — most notably their need to fill seats in the midst of the Covid-19 disruptions. Some colleges are also positioning themselves to scoop up refugees from institutions that have already, or are likely to, shut down or merge. At least 11 schools have announced just since March that they will close their doors, with hundreds more under financial stress.

https://hechingerreport.org/strapped-for-students-colleges-finally-begin-to-clear-transfer-logjam/

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October 25, 2020

Making best use of the link between emotions and learning

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Ted Sun, University World News

At university level, all faculties can make learning more meaningful and create practical value for their students. It is the responsibility of educators to make a lasting impact on their students. The current world needs graduates who can think critically in emotionally charged situations. We need leaders who are proactive in preventing problems from occurring and who are not sitting around waiting for crises to occur. To accomplish this, universities need to inspire and develop educators to transform the current cookie-cutter factory of education into an individualised educational model that is consistent with the student-centred learning message in their marketing.

https://www.universityworldnews.com/post.php?story=20200930185422174

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Six problem-solving mindsets for very uncertain times

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Charles Conn and Robert McLean, McKinsey

These leaders learn to adopt a particularly open and curious mindset, and adhere to a systematic process for cracking even the most inscrutable problems. They’re terrific problem solvers under any conditions. And when conditions of uncertainty are at their peak, they’re at their brilliant best. Six mutually reinforcing approaches underly their success: (1) being ever-curious about every element of a problem; (2) being imperfectionists, with a high tolerance for ambiguity; (3) having a “dragonfly eye” view of the world, to see through multiple lenses; (4) pursuing occurrent behavior and experimenting relentlessly; (5) tapping into the collective intelligence, acknowledging that the smartest people are not in the room; and (6) practicing “show and tell” because storytelling begets action (exhibit).

https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/strategy-and-corporate-finance/our-insights/six-problem-solving-mindsets-for-very-uncertain-times

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Enrollment fell at more than half of colleges this fall: survey

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Hallie Busta, Education Dive
Slightly more than half of nearly 300 college presidents surveyed in September by the American Council on Education (ACE) say their campuses’ enrollment is lower this fall than a year ago, with community college executives reporting decreases the most. Thirty-one percent of private four-year college presidents said they enrolled more students this fall, compared to 15% of public four-year and 10% of public two-year leaders. Some 70% of four-year college execs reported decreased international student enrollment.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/enrollment-fell-at-more-than-half-of-colleges-this-fall-survey/586779/

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October 24, 2020

Wake Up Higher Education. The Degree Is On The Decline.

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Brandon Busteed, Forbes
Higher education enrollment is on a decade-long decline. It’s pretty much inevitable that enrollment in U.S. higher education will be down for 10 consecutive years. The latest estimates from the National Student Clearinghouse show fall ’20 enrollments down 2.5% over last year. This will further the slide for spring ’21, which will end up being a decade’s worth of dropping enrollments for degree-seeking students. All told, at the peak in spring of 2011, 19,610,826 students were enrolled in U.S. higher education. By spring of 2020, that number had eroded to 17,458,306. I predict it will dip under 17 million this spring – making it a net loss of more than two and a half million students over the last decade.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/brandonbusteed/2020/09/25/wake-up-higher-education-the-degree-is-on-the-decline/#eaa3e557ecb4

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These are the types of people struggling most with remote work

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Gwen Moran, Fast Company

What were the indicators of people who are struggling with working from home? The researchers found two. One was agreeableness. This trait is “often associated with an individual’s proclivity toward maintaining positive relationships, feeling others’ emotions, sympathizing with others’ feelings and being interested in their challenges,” the researchers wrote. In other words, can you just go with the flow? People who are highly agreeable are more comfortable adapting to new situations. “They’re not going to get as frustrated. They’re not going to create as much conflict as new things are taken up,” Brodsky says. The other factor was neuroticism. In this context, these are people who are highly conscientious and self-aware, but they get anxious and fearful under pressure. The researchers found this group had the most trouble adapting to all-virtual work.

https://www.fastcompany.com/90561595/these-are-the-types-of-people-struggling-most-with-remote-work

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Microsoft is letting more employees work from home permanently

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Tom Warrent, the Verge

Microsoft is allowing more of its employees to work from home permanently, the company announced Friday. While the vast majority of Microsoft employees are still working from home during the ongoing pandemic, the software maker has unveiled “hybrid workplace” guidance internally to allow for far greater flexibility once US offices eventually reopen. The Verge has received Microsoft’s internal guidance, and it outlines the company’s flexible working plans for the future. Microsoft will now allow employees to work from home freely for less than 50 percent of their working week, or for managers to approve permanent remote work. Employees who opt for the permanent remote work option will give up their assigned office space, but still have options to use touchdown space available at Microsoft’s offices.

https://www.theverge.com/2020/10/9/21508964/microsoft-remote-work-from-home-covid-19-coronavirus

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October 23, 2020

With No Study Buddies, More College Students Turn to Cheating

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Jeffrey R. Young, EdSurge

With so many classes online during the pandemic—many of them taught by professors still struggling to figure out how to teach in the format—students are increasingly turning to homework-help websites. While many students say they’re looking for the assistance they’re not getting from their colleges, professors argue that students are using these sites to cheat on quizzes and tests. Joseph Ching, a junior at Purdue University, says many of his professors have warned students not to use sites like Chegg, where students are posting homework and quiz questions and getting answers from tutors.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2020-10-06-with-no-study-buddies-more-college-students-turn-to-cheating

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Virtual Signs of Serious Mental Health Problems: A Teacher’s Guide to Protecting Students

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Isaiah Pickens, EdSurge

Today’s students are the most at-risk for mental health problems in a generation. That was already true before the start of this turbulent year, thanks to the advent of the smartphone, the rise of social media and the growing dominance of internet culture in daily life. Now, students face a minefield of new and ongoing trauma-producing challenges, including the upheaval of normal school life caused by COVID-19, financial and social-emotional problems at home related to a parent’s job loss or family death due to the pandemic, parents’ frustrations from juggling multiple demands, and the stressful, systemic realities of racial injustice.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2020-10-07-virtual-signs-of-serious-mental-health-problems-a-teacher-s-guide-to-protecting-students

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The US role in advancing gender equality globally through girls’ education

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Christina Kwauk, Brookings

Analysis at the Brookings Institution estimates that education gaps between rich and poor girls will take a long time to close; universal secondary education for the poorest girls in sub-Saharan Africa is estimated to be achieved by 2111. The COVID-19 pandemic is worsening this timeline. Girls’ increased burden on domestic work and unpaid care during stay-at-home orders, their increased vulnerability to gender-based violence due to limited mobility during lockdown, and their lower access to technology and the internet means girls have less time and fewer resources to engage in remote learning, are at risk of unwanted and unplanned pregnancies, and are more likely to remain out of school when they eventually reopen.

https://www.brookings.edu/essay/the-uss-role-in-advancing-gender-equality-globally-through-girls-education/

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October 22, 2020

8 practices to build an online learning community

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MIKE DI GREGORIO, eCampus News

Before COVID-19 turned the academic world upside down, community and connection happened almost spontaneously. Students could walk into a classroom and introduce themselves to the people around them and instantly feel part of their learning community. They could linger afterwards to ask a question or organize a study group. Outside of class there were endless opportunities to socialize through clubs, sports teams, and other activities. Fast forward to 2020 and, for most students, the campus experience, at least as we’ve known it, has become another casualty of the ongoing pandemic. For better or worse, the virtual classroom is now the place for students to find that all important sense of community.

https://www.ecampusnews.com/2020/10/09/8-practices-to-build-an-online-learning-community/

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Emerging practices for measuring students’ relationships and networks

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Christensen Institute

Most schools and programs wholeheartedly agree that relationships matter. But far fewer actually measure students’ social capital. Oftentimes, relationships, valuable as they may be, are treated as inputs to learning and development rather than outcomes in their own right. In turn, schools routinely leave students’ access to relationships and networks to chance. To address this gap, a host of early innovators across K–12, postsecondary, and workforce development are making important strides toward purposefully building and measuring students’ social capital in an effort to expand access to opportunity. Drawing on those emerging practices, this paper offers a framework for measuring social capital grounded in both research and practice.

https://whoyouknow.org/measurement-report/

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