Lifeliqe Creator Allows Educators to Create Their Own 3D Content for Free

July 2nd, 2016

By Richard Chang, THE Journal

Lifeliqe, a platform for interactive, educational 3D, virtual reality and augmented reality, today launched Lifeliqe Creator, a program that gives teachers the power to create and publish interactive presentations and e-books that integrate 3D models, rather than 2D images. Lifeliqe users can explore objects — such as dinosaurs or the inside of a shark — with interactive 3D views. They can zoom deep into the structure of objects, experience augmented reality, view supplementary text on a subject and change the language for a bilingual view in English or Spanish. With the Lifeliqe Creator feature, any of the 1,000 interactive 3D models can be dragged and dropped right into a presentation, e-book or lesson plan, so teachers can provide students with interactive 3D experiences.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/06/21/lifeliqe-creator-allows-educators-to-create-their-own-3d-content.aspx

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Report: Wearable Shipments to Top 100 Million This Year

July 2nd, 2016

By Joshua Bolkan, Campus Technology

Global shipments of wearable devices will grow 29 percent over 2015 to hit 101.9 million units this year according to a new forecast from market research firm International Data Corp. (IDC). The segment will continue to see strong growth, according to the company, at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 20.3 percent through 2020, when it will ship 213.6 million units. The market leaders throughout the forecast period will remain watches and wrist bands.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/06/22/report-wearable-shipments-to-top-100-million-this-year.aspx

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Research Suggests Students Learn More When Working Together in Virtual Reality Games

July 2nd, 2016

By Michael Hart, Campus Technology

In the game, which is intended to help students learn Japanese — although it is designed to teach other languages as well — players go on “quests” to learn new words by watching game characters talk to each other. For instance, as one character walks away, another that is left behind says, “Sayonara.” The hope is that the player understands “Sayonara” means “goodbye.” At that point, the player can drag the word from a speech balloon into an inventory of terms that can later be used to construct sentences. In one group, students were connected via a chat interface with another player who could, if they wanted, offer advice on how to play. The second group played a version of the game in which they were definitely required to collaborate on quests. The research group found the students in the second so-called “high-interdependence” group spent more time communicating and, as a consequence, learned more words.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/06/22/research-suggests-students-learn-more-when-working-together-in-virtual-reality-games.aspx

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The Ever-Changing CIO Job Description

July 1st, 2016

By David Raths, Campus Technology

The chief information officer position continues to evolve as technology becomes more central to the mission of the university. How has that affected what the CIO does day to day? Campus Technology asked several longtime IT leaders, including Suess, to reflect on how they have seen the job change during their tenures.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/06/23/the-ever-changing-cio-job-description.aspx

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FCC Chairman Gets Educated on VR at Stanford

July 1st, 2016

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

A day after the a federal appeals court upheld net neutrality rules put into place last year by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the guy who heads that agency had a chance to try out virtual reality (VR) and to ask questions of Stanford University experts about how VR might affect future policy decisions. FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler visited the university specifically to check in on the Virtual Human Interaction Lab. The mission of that lab is to understand the impact of VR on interactions among people residing in digital worlds. Wheeler used the visit to emphasize the importance of “unfettered access to the entire web,” as he said in a prepared statement regarding the DC Circuit ruling. “Virtual reality shouldn’t have gatekeepers,” he told those participating in his Stanford visit. “It starts with an internet that is fast, fair and open.”

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/06/22/fcc-chairman-gets-educated-on-vr-at-stanford.aspx

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Higher ed systems expanding access to open-source materials

July 1st, 2016

By Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

Several higher education systems in the northeast have launched campus-based publishing imprints and initiatives designed to expand open-source and digital textbook production and usage. The State University of New York and University of New Hampshire systems are encouraging faculty to make broader use of open source publishing for research, teaching titles and learning opportunities to become more familiar with the technology. Programs that have moved from pilot to campus- or system-wide initiatives have begun to yield student savings — about $148,000 at the University of New Hampshire last year.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/higher-ed-systems-expanding-access-to-open-source-materials/421430/

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Technology key to university branding strategies

June 30th, 2016

By Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

eCampus News lays out three strategies to promote a successful branding campaign; digital archives and delivery systems are key for schools that want to expanding quality branding in recruitment, retention and community outreach. Building strong visual identity begins with feedback and support from campus stakeholders, and must be enforced with firm rules on presentation and usage. Making logos and marks accessible is critical to a successful branding campaign. Maintaining updated photo repositories and breaking down bureaucracy in securing these tools encourages institutional buy-in and support for branding guidelines.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/technology-key-to-university-branding-strategies/421329/

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Higher ed requires drastic changes to remain competitive for students

June 30th, 2016

By Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

More than 50 million Americans owe student loan debt, a number that exceeds the amount of people receiving benefits for Social Security and Medicaid. Demographics suggest the U.S. population is increasingly older and earns a lower median income than it did 10 years ago — a reality that clashes directly with increasing college costs across the country. Not only that, but the population is also shifting from the traditionally white, affluent male student population many schools are used to recruiting and educating to a broader cross-section of the country’s actual population. Competency-based instruction, predictive analytics and online education delivery are the keys to reducing costs and improving student outcomes in the 21st century.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/report-higher-ed-requires-drastic-changes-to-remain-competitive-for-studen/421338/

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Law Schools Are Going Online to Reach New Students

June 30th, 2016

By ELIZABETH OLSON, NY Times

Law schools, in the face of marked declines in enrollment, revenue and jobs for graduates, are beginning to adopt innovative new ways of delivering legal education. Some law schools are moving away from relying solely on classic settings and instead are blending classroom learning with online instruction, said Michael B. Horn, a founder of the Clayton Christensen Institute, a research institution in San Mateo, Calif., that explores disruptive innovation in education. “Legal education is confronting the most imminent threat in higher education,” Mr. Horn said. “Law schools are increasingly out of step with shifts in the legal services market.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/23/education/law-schools-are-going-online-to-reach-new-students.html?_r=0

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Aaron Sorkin to Teach Online Course on Screenwriting

June 29th, 2016

by Todd Spangler, Yahoo!

For $90, Aaron Sorkin will share his tricks of the screenwriting trade. Sorkin, scribe of such films such as “A Few Good Men,” “Steve Jobs” and “The Social Network” and TV shows including “The West Wing” and “The Newsroom,” will provide more than 25 video lessons through online-education startup MasterClass later this summer. The course — the first for the award-winning screenwriter — will also include a 30-page workbook and interactive assignments. “There’s a great tradition of writers from one generation giving a hand to the next group coming up — a tradition I got a lot of benefit from,” Sorkin said in a statement. “I think new screenwriters will come away from the MasterClass with a new sense of confidence.”

https://www.yahoo.com/movies/aaron-sorkin-teach-online-course-screenwriting-203350164.html

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Why you can’t discuss online learning without discussing video accessibility; but what’s really required?

June 29th, 2016

by Justin Beck, eCampus News

With nearly 1 in 5 Americans classified as having a disability, according to the 2010 census, and 13 percent of all public school students receiving special education services, accessibility is more important to educational institutions than ever before. While procedures for handling traditional materials have been well established for some time, higher ed educators’ increased reliance on video for lecture capture, supplemental materials, distance and online learning, and more is bringing the issue of video accessibility standards to the forefront. The key to accessible videos is captioning: 99 percent accurate captions, using a 508-compliant video player optimized for accessibility, make it possible for people with hearing, visual, and motor impairments to use video materials. But adding captions to an entire library of video materials can be daunting. How necessary is it?

http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/video-accessibility-online/

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Bay Area Organizations Help Refugees Access Free, Online Educations

June 29th, 2016

by CBS San Francisco

Bay Area organizationsare helping refugees access free, online educational courses through Coursera via Stanford University, the University of California, and other major universities around the world. In an effort to increase access to education for refugees and non-profit organizations that serve refugee populations, Mountain View-based, Coursera.org launched the Coursera for Refugees program on Monday, in honor of World Refugee Day. Globally, a record 65.3 million people were displaced from their homes by persecution and conflict in 2015, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Coursera, a for-profit, venture capital-backed provider of onlinecourses, is now offering thousands of courses to refugees, as well as specialized courses such as English for Business and Entrepreneurship via the University of Pennsylvania, Career Success via the University of California, Irvine and Python for Everybody via the University of Michigan.

http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2016/06/21/bay-area-organizations-help-refugees-access-free-online-educations/

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No more classroom, no more books: Hazelwood Elementary takes wireless learning outdoors

June 28th, 2016

By Jeremy Eaton, CBC News

Hazelwood Elementary will move some of its classes outside in September thanks to new technology recently installed at the St. John’s school. On Monday morning, teachers and students at Hazelwood launched their wireless outdoor classroom. “It’s a very special day,” said principal Dale Lambe. “One of our teachers had the idea that, not only could we construct an outdoor classroom but make it more accessible for all and make it more appealing for learners in the 21st century.” Most of the total cost of about $18,000 came from government funding and construction took about a week. Using wireless Internet and tablets, students will be able to use apps to study nature and the school’s outdoor surroundings.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/hazelwood-elementary-wireless-outdoor-classroom-1.3643324
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Study examines why students choose for-profit education

June 28th, 2016

By Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

More than two million students are enrolled in for-profit schools. These students tend to be older, minority students from low-income families with low levels of educational attainment. Typically divided into three categories, for-profit schools enrolled more than 11% of students in enterprises colleges, super systems or internet institutions at the height of their success, but have fallen to just over 9% in recent years. A field study of students at Millennium College revealed executive transparency was a major challenge, but in-person instruction and the fostered accountability and maturity among students was viewed as an asset of the blended online and in-person school structure.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/study-examines-why-students-choose-for-profit-education/421361/

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Coursera, State Department Launch Online Classes For Asylum-Seekers

June 28th, 2016

BY JULIA GLUM, International Business Times

Refugees trying to start their lives over in new places are about to have a whole host of new learning opportunities. The U.S. State Department announced Monday a collaboration with the free education site Coursera aimed at helping recent transplants access more than 1,000 massive open online courses, nicknamed MOOCs, according to a news release. The program appeared to be live Monday morning at refugees.coursera.org. Timed to launch on World Refugee Day, the initiative is intended to give refugees a chance to gain “important skills that will help them in the global economy,” Evan Ryan, assistant secretary of state for educational and cultural affairs, told reporters on a press call last week, Quartz reported. Nonprofits around the world can apply to Coursera to get fee waivers that will fund refugees’ participation in MOOCs, which are run by institutions like Stanford University.

http://www.ibtimes.com/world-refugee-day-2016-coursera-state-department-launch-online-classes-asylum-seekers-2384332

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Robots won’t replace teachers because they can’t inspire us

June 28th, 2016

BY ERIC JOHNSON, Recode

But artificial intelligence is coming to colleges in some form, Coursera president Daphne Koller says. Artificial intelligence is going to change everything in every industry. Right? Not so fast, says Coursera president and co-founder Daphne Koller. Her education company markets itself as being ahead of technological disruption, but even it isn’t so sure AI can do everything that a human college professor can do. “Instructors are valuable, first of all, in creating the content. That’s really important,” Koller said in an interview with Recode’s Kara Swisher on the latest episode of Recode Decode. “But I also think it’s important to have someone there to answer the really challenging questions if you really get stuck. And also, people will tell you that one of the most inspirational experiences they’ve had, that have often shaped their life, is someone who’s been a really inspirational teacher.”

http://www.recode.net/2016/6/22/11985726/robot-teachers-artificial-intelligence-coursera-daphne-koller

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Google and Udacity launch a new Android programming course for beginners

June 27th, 2016

by Lucia Maffei, Tech Crunch

Google wants more people to learn to program — especially for its Android platform. While the company already offered a few programming courses, they were typically geared toward students with at least some rudimentary programming experience. Starting today, the Google Android Basics Nanodegree class is available on the online learning platform Udacity. It’s the first Android nanodegree class designed by Google for people with no programming experience at all. “Google, in partnership with Udacity, is making Android development accessible and understandable to everyone, so that regardless of your background, you can learn to build apps that improve the lives of people around you,” Shanea King-Roberson, program manager at Google, said in a blog post.

https://techcrunch.com/2016/06/22/google-and-udacity-launch-a-new-android-programming-course-for-beginners/?ncid=mobilenavtrend

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The U.S. State Department and Coursera Offer Free Online Courses to Refugees

June 27th, 2016

by EdSurge

Coursera has announced the launch of Coursera for Refugees in partnership with the U.S. Department of State. The initiative lets refugees and nonprofits supporting them apply for financial aid to access Coursera’s library of online courses. Coursera is not the first to offer a MOOC-for-refugees program—edX stepped into this space in February—but it is the first to partner with the State Department, which will provide in-person facilitation at embassies and consulates and help identify partner organizations currently supporting refugee communities. In 2013, the State Department announced its MOOC Camp initiative, hosted at U.S. embassies and consulates around the world, partnering with Coursera as a Global Learning Hub. Coursera for Refugees continues this partnership, potentially enabling refugees to build career skills to find employment as now any nonprofit (501(c)(3) or international equivalent can apply for at least one year of comprehensive group financial aid.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-06-20-the-u-s-state-department-and-coursera-offer-free-online-courses-to-refugees

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Adaptive Learning Holds Promise for the Future of Higher Education

June 27th, 2016

by Education Dive

As an educational model, differentiated instruction has been around since the time of Socrates. As a method of providing a classroom of students, often with differing abilities, instruction based on individual aptitudes for learning, it has been an effective alternative to repetitive rote memorization that is still widely practiced in many countries around the world. Today, with the widespread availability of new learning software and platforms, differentiated instruction can take on a revolutionary role under the guise of adaptive learning, and it could alter our thinking about education and the way students learn. Supporters of adaptive learning say it could be the answer to what has become now known as the ‘iron triangle’ of education’s biggest challenges: cost, access, and quality.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/adaptive-learning-holds-promise-for-the-future-of-higher-education/421228/

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Internet of Things, Machine Learning & Robotics Are High Priorities For Developers In 2016

June 26th, 2016

by Louis Columbus, Forbes

56.4% of developers are building robotics apps today.

45% of developers say that Internet of Things (IoT) development is critical to their overall digital strategy.

56.4% of developers are building robotics apps today.

45% of developers say that Internet of Things (IoT) development is critical to their overall digital strategy.

27.4% of all developers are building apps in the cloud today.

24.7% are using machine learning for development projects.

These and many other insights are from the Evans Data Corporation Global Development Survey, Volume 1 (PDF, client access) published earlier this month. The methodology was based on interviews with developers actively creating new applications with the latest technologies.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/louiscolumbus/2016/06/18/internet-of-things-machine-learning-robotics-are-high-priorities-for-developers-in-2016/#1f4e1e835644

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Coursera president Daphne Koller: Your old college diploma isn’t good enough for the 21st century economy

June 26th, 2016

By ERIC JOHNSON, Recode

A college degree, per the old conventional wisdom, was your ticket to a career of better work and higher pay. That may still be true, but the digital economy demands ever more, Coursera president and co-founder Daphne Koller said on the newest episode of Recode Decode, hosted by Kara Swisher. Coursera’s pitch to students is that education should last a lifetime and that it’s too big a risk for them to stop learning new skills in their 20s. “The things you learned in college 15 years ago are no longer the skills that you need for your next job,” Koller said. “Millennials today are expected to change jobs something like every three years. The job that they need next is going to have a completely different skillset than the job that they previously had.”

http://www.recode.net/2016/6/20/11974092/daphne-koller-coursera-online-college-education-podcast

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