Taking Undergraduate Computer Science Online

December 7th, 2016

by Military Technologies

Georgia Tech and McGraw-Hill Education are teaming up on an innovative approach to make elite education more broadly accessible. They’re launching an online, undergraduate course in computer science that will debut this spring for current Tech students and be made available in MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) format to help future Georgia Tech applicants earn college credit before they ever set foot on campus. The online “Introduction to Computing Using Python” course will feature the same rigorous content as Georgia Tech’s on-campus course (a requirement for all undergraduates) and will be created with McGraw-Hill Education’s adaptive “SmartBook” technology. Like many other MOOCs, it will be freely available through edX, the nonprofit online learning destination founded by Harvard and MIT.

http://military-technologies.net/2016/11/29/taking-undergraduate-computer-science-online/

Share on Facebook

Eight States Have Fewer Than 10 Girls Take AP Computer Science Exam; two states have none!

December 7th, 2016

By Richard Chang, THE Journal

More girls are taking the annual AP computer science exam, but boys still outnumber girls when it comes to taking the test. In fact, fewer than 10 girls took the May 2016 exam in eight states, and not a single female took the test in Mississippi and Montana. These are some of the findings of a state-by-state analysis of newly released data from the College Board by Barbara Ericson, the director of computing outreach and senior research scientist at the College of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/11/29/eight-states-have-fewer-than-10-girls-take-ap-computer-science-exam.aspx

Share on Facebook

Report: Flipped and Mobile Helping to Drive Growing Momentum in E-Learning Content and Courses

December 7th, 2016

By Leila Meyer, THE Journal

The generic e-learning course market is projected to grow by 8 percent per year over the next four years, driven primarily by growth in general purpose learning applications, cost-effectiveness of generic e-learning courses and increased adoption of mobile learning, according to a new report from Technavio, a global technology research and advisory company. The company defines generic e-learning courses as standard courses on a subject offered by service providers, educational institutions and experts, and prepared according to the standard curriculum. The report, “Generic E-learning Course Market in the U.S. 2016–2020,” examines the current state of the generic e-learning course market in the United States and forecasts trends over the coming years.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/11/28/report-flipped-and-mobile-helping-to-drive-growing-momentum-in-elearning-content-and-courses.aspx

Share on Facebook

Look Good, Feel Good, Do Better in Online Courses

December 6th, 2016

By Amanda Cohen, ULoop

There is a common belief among college students that dressing nicely will help them focus better in class, and ultimately receive a better grade in the course. However, I have never thought about this “Look good, feel good, do better” debate applying to online courses until now. Usually, students will take online courses over summer vacation in order to get ahead in credits (at least most of my friends did). Whenever we would discuss online courses, most of my friends would say that they complete most of the work in their pajamas/comfortable gear lying in bed. So, the question at hand is whether or not students would be more successful in their online courses if they dressed for the occasion? Honestly, it truly depends on the person. However, I do find that I am most successful in accomplishing what I need to get done when my outward appearance is on the cute-casual spectrum rather than the pajama spectrum.

http://www.uloop.com/news/view.php/220302/Look-Good-Feel-Good-Do-Better-in-Online-Courses

Share on Facebook

Enrollment in Indiana University online classes reaches new heights

December 6th, 2016

by Kelly Evans, Indiana Daily Student

In the fall of 2012, IU announced the implementation of a new learning curriculum with the hopes of extending education to more groups of students and truly making the IU culture and what it means to be a Hoosier accessible to young minds everywhere. Today students know this program as IU Online — or informally known as the online alternative to many in-person courses. Just four years after its development, more than 25 percent of IU students are enrolled in online classes through the program at IU, according to IU Online.

http://www.idsnews.com/article/2016/11/online-class-enrollment-reaches-new-heights

Share on Facebook

Beginning of a revolution in Education through Coursera

December 6th, 2016

by GAURAV SANGWANI, Business Insider

Coursera is basically an education-focused technology company that offers courses and learning experiences from the world’s top universities and education institutions including Stanford University, University of Pennsylvania, Duke University, University of Virginia, and ISB. It has more than 22 million registered learners worldwide who can access over 1,600 courses and 160 Specializations in dozens of topics including business, technology, social sciences, health, and art. This education-focused technology company now has a recommendations engine that will tell you about courses and specializations that teach the skills you need; kind of like a career counselor.

http://www.businessinsider.in/Beginning-of-a-revolution-in-Education-through-Coursera/articleshow/55436075.cms

Share on Facebook

What will become of libraries?

December 5th, 2016

by Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

Inside Higher Ed recaps Educause’s annual conference held last month, in which one session asked participants to visualize the college library of the future. A recent MIT report suggests that libraries will transition from repositories of historical and research information, to open source hubs with information on best practices and real-time deployments to address intractable problems. The model follows a similar effort from the Georgia Institute of Technology, which will share book storage space with Emory University to make its library facility more conducive to studying and innovation.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/what-will-become-of-libraries/431163/

Share on Facebook

OER revolution in higher ed

December 5th, 2016

by Matt Zalaznick, University Business

The University of Maryland’s open source textbook initiative, known as “MOST,” has guided faculty through more than 50 OER adoptions. The program helps instructors assemble resources to significantly keep down the cost of course materials. The University of Maryland’s open source textbook initiative, known as “MOST,” has guided faculty through more than 50 OER adoptions. The program helps instructors assemble resources to significantly keep down the cost of course materials. Open educational resources have grown over the last few years from one-off oddities in single courses to the basis of entire degree programs. Cutting out textbook costs for students tops the list of reasons administrators encourage faculty to develop and adopt these free—or very inexpensive—resources, also known as OER.

https://www.universitybusiness.com/article/oer-revolution-higher-ed

Share on Facebook

A Faster, Cheaper Master’s Degree – From MIT To Boot

December 5th, 2016

by Kirk Carapezza, WGBH

Top colleges and universities around the world are partnering with edX – MIT and Harvard’s online learning platform – to offer MicroMasters. There’s User Interface Design from the University of Michigan, Entrepreneurship from the Indian Institute of Management in Bangalore, and Artificial Intelligence from Columbia University. Industry leaders – including General Electric, Walmart, IBM, and Volvo – who say they can’t find enough qualified candidates, are looking for these very specialized skills. To some degree, they’ve all recognized MicroMasters, saying they will consider applicants who master the work online. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts is also embracing the idea. “We need kind a revolution in higher education to make it more accessible, more affordable, and we need to have far higher success rates,” said Chris Gabrieli, chairman of the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education.

http://blogs.wgbh.org/on-campus/2016/11/28/accelerated-more-affordable-path-masters-degree/

Share on Facebook

How text messages help mentors connect with students in Idaho

December 4th, 2016

by NICHOLE DOBO, Hechinger Report

The text message is a powerful tool in an unconventional high school program in Idaho. The technology allows mentors working with Idaho PTECH to reach high school students in far-flung places in this sparsely populated state. The high-tech, one-on-one mentoring is part of a pilot program that aims to help students discover and prepare for a career that they can embark on right out of high school, or with minimal post-secondary training. “They don’t know what they want a lot of times,” said Alan Millar, executive director of Idaho PTECH, so the mentoring provides “a caring adult to talk about goals, reaffirm them, and make concrete steps how to get there.”

http://hechingerreport.org/how-text-messages-help-mentors-connect-with-students-in-idaho/

Share on Facebook

The Future of Online Education: Will Our Courses Foreshadow Our End?

December 4th, 2016

Anthony Picciano, Evolllution

American higher education is moving to a model where almost every course offered will have an online component. This is desirable during a time when enrollments will rise and perhaps get a boost if calls for debt-free public college education gain momentum. Because of state funding constraints, there will likely be fewer full-time, tenure-track faculty as a percentage of the total faculty as contract, untenured adjunct faculty, and tutors will take on more of the teaching load. Instructional approaches such as learning analytics, adaptive learning, competency-based instruction, interactive media, and mobile technology will mature in the 2020s. In the 2030s and beyond, it is likely that major new technology breakthroughs such as artificial intelligence, massive cloud computing, and brain machine interfaces will emerge that will change many aspects of human endeavor including education.

http://evolllution.com/programming/teaching-and-learning/the-future-of-online-education-will-our-courses-foreshadow-our-ends/

Share on Facebook

Understanding Blended Learning Through Innovative Professional Development

December 4th, 2016

By Stepan Mekhitarian, EdSurge

There are two common practices used during professional development sessions that are limited in their applicability and effectiveness: First, teachers learn about multiple sites or tools they can use in their classrooms and are given time to experiment with them. Second, teachers discuss instructional practice for application in a traditional classroom, but are then expected to apply it in a blended setting. Neither of these practices melds effective pedagogical practice with educational technology to train teachers on how to offer individualized differentiation and constructivist learning opportunities for students. Another approach, however, can dramatically impact the effectiveness of blended learning professional development. Follow the steps below to apply a blended approach to professional development while focusing on effective instructional practice: Start with a pedagogical concept such as questioning or grouping that applies to all teachers.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-11-19-understanding-blended-learning-through-innovative-professional-development

Share on Facebook

Professors in doubt over value of distance education

December 3rd, 2016

by Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

A new survey from Gallup suggests that a predominant number of college and university faculty members, about 55%, are not confident in the outcomes of distance education when measured against traditional learning models. Of a respondent pool of more than 1,600 professors from all private, public and for-profit institutions, 40% said they have taught at least one online class, and 32% believed that learning was possible through digital and traditional classroom settings at any institution. More than 60% of professors with no online teaching experience believe that positive outcomes are possible in either academic setting.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/professors-in-doubt-over-value-of-distance-education/431074/

Share on Facebook

Visionary: How 4 institutions are venturing into a new mixed reality

December 3rd, 2016

BY LAURA DEVANEY, eCampus News

Mixed reality combines virtual and augmented realities for enhanced learning experiences–and institutions are already implementing it. A new collaboration between Pearson and Microsoft is using a self-contained holographic computer to develop “mixed reality” learning experiences for students. The collaboration will explore how mixed reality can help solve real challenges in areas of learning, ranging from online tutoring and coaching, nursing education, and engineering to construction and surveyor training. Microsoft says its HoloLens is the world’s first self-contained holographic computer. Pearson is developing and piloting mixed reality content at colleges, universities and secondary schools in the United States and around the world.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/disruptions-and-innovations/institutions-mixed-reality/

Share on Facebook

How to grow your online brand and generate offline results for success in campus branding

December 3rd, 2016

BY KRYSTAL PUTMAN-GARCIA, eCampus News

If you walk on any campus today, you’d be hard-pressed to find a student that didn’t have a laptop or smart phone. In fact, 96 percent of young adults ages 18-29 use the internet – and those with a college education are more likely to use the internet than those who do not, according to a Pew Research Study. Your college can benefit from strengthening its online brand by reaching prospective students, current college attendees and alumni. The stronger the online brand, the more likely students and visitors will engage with a school. Fortunately, there are some simple ways colleges can grow their online brands that ultimately lead to offline results.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/campus-administration/technology-campus-branding/

Share on Facebook

A ‘Moon Shot’ for Libraries

December 2nd, 2016

By Carl Straumsheim, Inside Higher Ed

Chris Bourg, director of libraries at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, describes the MIT report as a “moon shot” for libraries. The wide-ranging report covers digitization, open access, redesign of physical spaces and more, but it ultimately recommends libraries focus on four “pillars”: community and relationships, discovery and use, stewardship and sustainability, and research and development. Bourg said, “Providing access to credible information and the tools to assess, use, understand and exploit it is what libraries, librarians and archivists have always done. It’s more important than ever now.” MIT, with its focus on science, technology, engineering and math, is in a different position to grapple with those issues compared to universities with traditional strengths (and extensive library collections) in the humanities and social sciences, other library directors and researchers said.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/11/23/massachusetts-institute-technology-invites-academe-collaborate-future-libraries

Share on Facebook

Colleges look to the cloud for student intervention services

December 2nd, 2016

by Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

University Business reports on the growing number of campuses using cloud-based technology to improve online services wth academic intervention and student life. A variety of systems tracking student data on attendance, learning resource utilization and student life helps campuses to more easily divert resources based upon student need or desire, with stronger integration between systems becoming easier to create and to manage. Security concerns about cloud-based technology have decreased in the last two years, as technologies and safeguards have improved to help preserve student information.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/colleges-look-to-the-cloud-for-student-intervention-services/430949/

Share on Facebook

Could virtual reality set new standards for educational access?

December 2nd, 2016

by Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

Ed Tech Magazine profiles the growth of virtual reality in college learning settings, which is a $150 billion industry making waves in healthcare, criminal justice and gaming industries. Some experts think that VR technology will reinvent library and research materials access, distance education and curriculum engagement in the applied sciences and liberal arts. Other implications could include cost reduction for teaching delivery, and global access to a variety of innovative courses and learning experiences.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/could-virtual-reality-set-new-standards-for-educational-access/430968/

Share on Facebook

Microsoft, Code.org Use Minecraft to Teach Coding

December 1st, 2016

By David Nagel, THE Journal

Microsoft and Code.org have come together to debut Minecraft Designer, a free tutorial for students aged 6 and up that uses the Minecraft environment to teach coding. Minecraft Designer is a free, hour-long, interactive online tutorial (with offline capabilities for those who want to work when they don’t have access to the Internet) that teaches basic coding in Minecraft and, perhaps more importantly, is designed to inspire interest in computer science, particularly among groups that might not traditionally pursue CS.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/11/15/microsoft-code.org-use-minecraft-to-teach-coding.aspxMicrosoft, Code.org Use Minecraft to Teach Coding

Share on Facebook

Online law degrees flourish under tight supervision

December 1st, 2016

by: Ian Wylie, Financial Times

The latest law school to say it will venture a hybrid JD programme is Syracuse University College of Law. From 2018, pending approval from the American Bar Association, students will take classes online then come to campus for weeklong residential sessions. The school, which hopes the programme will help reverse its enrolment decline, is delivering the course with edtech company 2U. The school’s intake for 2016 is up 14 per cent on last year, but — in line with the national trend — still almost a fifth lower than a decade ago. The cost of tuition will be the same as the standard JD programme at Syracuse but the “opportunity cost” of attending will be “significantly lower”, says Nina Kohn, associate dean for research. “Students can continue working while completing their degree and will not have to move their families or leave their existing support systems,” she says. Syracuse will be only the second law school accredited by the ABA to offer such a hybrid JD programme; Mitchell Hamline School of Law launched the first last year. In 1998, non-ABA-accredited Concord Law School rolled out the first online JD programme, and other non-ABA accredited schools soon followed.

https://www.ft.com/content/41458ab4-9ab7-11e6-8f9b-70e3cabccfae

Share on Facebook

Student Success Pervades Top IT Issues for 2017

December 1st, 2016

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

Yes, it’s true that for the second year running cybersecurity has come in first on Educause’s list of the Top 10 IT issues for higher education. But this year it doesn’t dominate the results as it did last year, according to Susan Grajek, the organization’s vice president of data, research and analytics. Information security “is a huge risk area,” she said, but, according to Educause member votes, “not by quite as much.” Instead, Grajek sees growing concern for the broader area of student success, an issue that landed in third place in 2016, fourth place in 2015 and first place in 2014. While the explicit topic of student success showed up second on the 2017 list, Grajek pointed out that many if not most of the other issues link back to that theme — including data-informed decision making (No. 3 in the ranking), effective leadership (No. 4), the digital transformation of learning (No. 10) and even sustainable funding (No. 8).

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/11/10/student-success-pervades-top-it-issues-for-2017.aspx

Share on Facebook