10 reasons why blended learning is exploding

February 26th, 2017

BY MERIS STANSBURY, eCampus News

Infographic delves into recent education trend data to explain why blended learning is taking off. Blended learning, like many other buzzwords in education, is getting thrown around in ed-tech conversations as one of the hottest trends taking over course instruction and luring prospective students to colleges. But just like the current backlash against MOOCs, it’s important to know why a trend occurs in order to gauge its shelf life. Blended learning is constantly evolving, with most of the innovations and refinements developed to support student-centered learning, explains DreamBox Learning, creator of the infographic.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/online-learning/blended-learning-exploding/

Share on Facebook

What’s Stopping Education IoT?

February 26th, 2017

BY TOM RUFF, eCampus News

College and University campuses could greatly benefit from the Internet of Things, so why is adoption in higher ed lagging? The proliferation of Internet of Things (IoT) connected devices is on a steady rise. Analysts predict that from now through 2020, the number of connected “things” will grow from 13.5 billion units to 38.5 billion units, a growth of over 285 percent. While many people think of consumer devices, like smart TVs and thermostats, as making up the bulk of IoT devices, their role in education should not be overlooked. More and more, everything on a campus is connected to the Internet. And, just as IoT connected devices are improving consumers’ lives, enterprises’ business and public sector organizations’ services, IoT could benefit the entire education ecosystem in numerous ways.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/it-newsletter/whats-stopping-education-iot/

Share on Facebook

Should Online Courses Go Through ‘Beta Testing’? How One Provider Taps 2,500 Volunteers

February 26th, 2017

By Jeffrey R. Young, EdSurge

Wesley Engers has an unusual hobby: beta testing online courses from well-known colleges and universities. He doesn’t get paid, but he helps improve the quality of courses by catching mistakes in quizzes and pointing out befuddling bits of video lectures, which can then be clarified before professors release the course to students. “I find it much more engaging than reading a book,” says Engers, a 29-year-old data scientist, when asked why he does it. “And I do enjoy giving back and trying to contribute to a community and help future students.” He’s one of about 2,500 volunteer beta testers for Coursera, and part of an expanded quality-control effort the company started in the past year.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-02-17-should-online-courses-go-through-beta-testing-how-one-provider-taps-2-500-volunteers

Share on Facebook

How data analytics can bring out the best in a university

February 25th, 2017

by Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

New systems of data analytics can equip college campuses to set and reach goals for student achievement, operational efficiency, and financial stability, Ed Tech: Focus on Higher Ed reported — but the first step in harnessing these benefits is understanding concepts of implementation and execution. A risk that campuses face is the integration of analytics in partial rollouts, which can create ‘haves and have-nots’ among students and faculty, and gleaning best practices from peer institutions and vendors is a good way of preventing this kind of digital divide. Institutional culture and campus governance are also critical areas to consider before a major tech rollout, as faculty, staff and students will have to buy into the new systems and their potential benefits.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/university-data-analytics-security-operations/436355/

Share on Facebook

Elite colleges bet big on micro-degree programs

February 25th, 2017

by Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

Several colleges and universities are now offering micro degree programs in the hopes of attracting professionals interested in career development while selling full graduate degree programs in the process, NPR reported yesterday. MIT, Columbia University and the University of Michigan are just a few of the high research institutions attracting students through these online programs, which offer advanced credentialing in engineering, business and computer science for a fraction of tuition costs that can exceed $60,000 a year for full degrees. The programs, which have the same rigorous admission standards as traditional offerings, can present a challenge to some students who enroll without prior experience in the disciplines.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/university-micro-degree-program-MIT-columbia-michigan/436372/

Share on Facebook

These Top Schools Are Offering Big Savings On Master’s Degrees, But There’s A Catch

February 25th, 2017

by KIRK CARAPEZZA, NPR

There’s an experiment underway at a few top universities around the world to make some master’s degrees out there more affordable. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for example, says the class of 2018 can get a master’s degree in supply chain management with tens of thousands in savings. The university’s normal price runs upwards of $67,000 for the current academic year. But it’s not as simple as sending in a coupon with your tuition bill. There are big hurdles for students, and clear benefits for the universities.

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2017/02/15/504478472/how-to-get-20-000-off-the-price-of-a-masters-degree

Share on Facebook

A Guide to Picking a Learning Management System: The Right Questions to Ask

February 24th, 2017

By Mary Jo Madda, EdSurge

As University of Central Florida’s Associate Vice President of Distributed Learning, Tom Cavanagh, wrote in an article for EDUCAUSE, “every institute has a unique set of instructional and infrastructure circumstances to consider when deciding on an LMS,” but at the same time, “all institutions face certain common requirements”—whether a small charter school, a private university or a large public school district. Thus, garnered from conversations with both K-12 and higher education administrators, the following checklist provides a starting point for any educator interested in prepping for the inevitable task of choosing an LMS for the 2017-2018 school year. (And for some additional help, each educator has offered rationales for why those checklist items should be included.)

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-02-14-a-guide-to-learning-management-systems-the-right-questions-to-ask

Share on Facebook

NMC Horizon Report > 2017 Higher Education Edition

February 24th, 2017

by the New Media Consortium

This 14th edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in education. Six key trends, six significant challenges, and six important developments in educational technology are placed directly in the context of their likely impact on the core missions of universities and colleges. Among the technologies that are spotlighted: Adaptive Learning, Mobile Learning, Internet of Things, Next Generation LMS, Artificial Intelligence, and Natural User Interfaces.

http://www.nmc.org/publication/nmc-horizon-report-2017-higher-education-edition/

Share on Facebook

Teach Kids to Code and Secure Their Future

February 24th, 2017

by MATTHEW LYNCH, Tech Edvocate

Software applications are part of our everyday existence, and that means the language used to create them is only more important. It is also a language that is somewhat universal, as programming languages are used worldwide. This means code has the ability to make our vast world feel smaller as we use it to find common ground. Learning to code is a hands-on experience. While certain key aspects of a language can be introduced in textbooks, the true learning experience happens when children have the opportunity to use what they know to create simple programs. Additionally, they receive the benefits of fast feedback when their code is executed. In most cases, a kid will know if mere moments if their code contains errors.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/teach-kids-to-code-and-secure-their-future/

Share on Facebook

Ransomware: Should you pay up?

February 23rd, 2017

By Stephanie Condon, ZD Net

The use of ransomware has spiked in recent years: Roughly A high percentage of spam emails in 2016 contained ransomware, according to a recent IBM Security study. Part of the reason is simply that it works: Nearly 70 percent of business victims surveyed by IBM said they paid hackers to recover data. The incentives of hackers are straightforward — they’re looking for a big payday — but it’s less clear whether their victims should cooperate. “It’s very simple in my mind,” said Michael Duff, the CISO for Stanford University, on a ransomware panel at the RSA Conference in San Francisco on Monday. “If you’re not able to reconstitute a system in the timeframe you need, and you need it up and running, pay the ransom.” Neil Jenkins, of the Homeland Security Department’s Enterprise Performance Management Office (EPMO), said that, “From the US government perspective, we definitely discourage the payment of ransom.”"From a national perspective… paying ransom encourages the business model,” he said. “The reason this has become such a popular thing to do is they’re actually making money off of this.”

http://www.zdnet.com/article/ransomware-should-you-pay-up/

Share on Facebook

Infected Vending Machines And Light Bulbs DDoS A University

February 23rd, 2017

by Lee Mathews, Forbes

IoT devices have become a favorite weapon of cybercriminals. Their generally substandard security — and the sheer numbers of connected devices — make them an enticing target. We’ve seen what a massive IoT botnet is capable of doing, but even a relatively small one can cause a significant amount of trouble. Infected Vending Machines And LightA few thousand infected IoT devices can cut a university off from the Internet, according to an incident that the Verizon RISK (Research, Investigations, Solutions and Knowledge) team was asked to assist with. All the attacker had to do was re-program the devices so they would periodically try to connect to seafood-related websites. By training around 5,000 devices to send DNS queries simultaneously (for those who aren’t familiar, DNS is what allows your computer to turn a name like Forbes.com into an IP address that it can connect to). In this particular case, those devices included everything from drink vending machines to street lamps.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/leemathews/2017/02/13/infected-vending-machines-and-light-bulbs-ddos-a-university/

Share on Facebook

What educators can learn about effective teaching from a Harvard prof

February 23rd, 2017

BY ALAN NOVEMBER, Campus Technology

Harvard professor David Malan has managed to pull off a neat trick: His Computer Science 50 course is the most popular course at both Harvard and Yale. By examining his success, we can learn some important lessons about effective teaching. CS50 assumes no prior knowledge or skill in computer programming, yet it’s extremely demanding. Despite its rigor, CS50 regularly attracts thousands of students each year. While some aspire to become software engineers, others enroll just to experience the course. Why is Professor Malan’s course so popular, even with students who don’t plan a career in computer science—and even though it requires a lot of work? Here are three keys to Malan’s effective teaching that I think all schools everywhere should apply, from K-12 schools to colleges and universities.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/curriculum/effective-teaching-harvard-prof/

Share on Facebook

Harvard Tailoring the MOOC Experience With Adaptive Learning

February 22nd, 2017

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

Harvard University has begun experimenting with the use of adaptive functionality in one of its massive open online courses (MOOCs). The initial finding is that students using the adaptive assessments learned more than those who didn’t — and spent less time overall getting through problems. Adaptive technology uses information gained as the learner interacts with the system to change up how a concept is presented by level of difficulty, order and types of help provided. The experiment took place in a single HarvardX course, “Super-Earths and Life” (now available as an on-demand course), deployed in the current academic year.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/02/02/harvard-tailoring-the-mooc-experience-with-adaptive-learning.aspx

Share on Facebook

10 Faculty Perceptions of Lecture Capture Technology

February 22nd, 2017

By Pamela Vande Voort, Campus Technology

In a study of faculty experiences using lecture capture systems in the classroom, responses reveal 10 primary themes around how the technology is impacting the education process. Lecture capture, a teaching and learning tool that allows faculty to record and post the audio, video and presentation content of classroom lectures and the classroom experience, is a boon for students who want to access the material at their convenience for review and supplementary instruction. And it can be a life saver for students who miss all or part of class, or who discover their notes are incomplete. But how do faculty perceive the technology in today’s higher education classrooms, and what impact is it having on the educational process?

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/02/08/10-faculty-perceptions-of-lecture-capture-technology.aspx

Share on Facebook

7 Tips for Listing MOOCs on Your Résumé

February 22nd, 2017

By David Weldon, Campus Technology

Georgia Tech first began offering MOOCs in 2011 and has since increased its investment in the program. Last year the school put its most difficult degree program — the master’s degree in information technology — online, at a cost to the student of $6,700. In order to be accepted into the MOOC program, a student had to meet the full criteria of being a Georgia Tech student. And the institution worked hard to make sure that online students would receive an education that is on par with their campus counterparts. So, once students have gone through such a high-quality program, how do they use their MOOC experience to best advantage? Sham Mustafa, CEO and founder of Correlation One, has some thoughts. His company provides matchmaking services, focused on connecting employers with highly skilled data scientists. Those data scientists are heavily represented in the first waves of MOOC students.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/02/09/7-tips-for-listing-moocs-on-your-resume.aspx

Share on Facebook

National Adult Learner Coalition Created to Advance Student Success

February 21st, 2017

by Bezinga

Four major associations join together as a cohesive voice advocating for adult students and the institutions that serve them. With support from Lumina Foundation, the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL), the Online Learning Consortium (OLC), Presidents’ Forum, and University Professional and Continuing Education Association (UPCEA) are pleased to announce the National Adult Learner Coalition. “For more than a century, UPCEA has advocated for adult learners,” said Robert Hansen, CEO, UPCEA. “Once a small minority, adult and non-traditional learners now constitute up to 85 percent of today’s students.” “Our coalition is dedicated to help realign federal policy with this new higher education landscape, advocating for the expansion of access, innovation, and creative solutions.”

https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/17/02/p9009921/national-adult-learner-coalition-created-to-advance-student-success

Share on Facebook

Online Learning Technologies to Boost the Global Medical Education Market Through 2021

February 21st, 2017

by Technavio, Business Wire

Global medical education market to grow at a CAGR of close to 17% during the period 2017-2021. Medical professionals are increasingly imparting education through online methodologies, largely replacing traditional physical classrooms. Universities and healthcare organizations are providing online medical education courses. Online methods such as flipped classrooms and blended learning offer myriad benefits to both students and teachers. These benefits vary from access features to course materials, online assessment facilities. It also has varied synchronous as well as asynchronous communication means such as webcasts and video conferencing. “Online learning technologies are becoming largely popular in emerging nations such as Kenya and China wherein most students do not have access to qualified teachers,” says Jhansi.

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170207005730/en/Online-Learning-Technologies-Boost-Global-Medical-Education

Share on Facebook

Are Free Online Courses Worth the Time and Effort?

February 21st, 2017

by John Boitnott, Entrepreneur

To assess the efficacy of their programs, Coursera surveyed 52,000 of their users and asked them how taking an online course benefited them. The majority (over 60 percent) said the move helped them develop skills in their new position. Forty percent reported that they believed it improved their candidacy for a new job. Only 25 percent, however, said that they found a new job, and less than 5 percent received a raise. The final takeaway is this: free online courses can improve your current skill set and make you a better employee. It also shows initiative, which managers like. But it won’t necessarily land you a dream job.

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/288781

Share on Facebook

Reprogramming the Digital Workforce With Online Education

February 20th, 2017

by Insights, Samsung Government

Today’s workforce faces a greater range of threats to their livelihoods than ever before. Many jobs will come under threat in the next decade from trends such as globalization, automation and robotics. However, the growing digital workforce doesn’t necessarily mean the end for today’s workers. With the abundance of education and training classes now available online, employees can stay ahead of the game and safeguard their futures by developing new skills and talents, making them indispensable to their employers. Education has long been seen as something which you do at the start of your career, jamming as much training as possible into the early part of your life, before moving into the world of work. However, with today’s digital workforce and the trend of continuing education gaining pace, employees — and employers — are beginning to see the benefits of upgrading skills while on the job.

https://insights.samsung.com/2017/02/09/reprogramming-the-digital-workforce-with-online-education

Share on Facebook

Learn about virtual reality and 360 video in free online course: Intro to Immersive Journalism

February 20th, 2017

by Knight Center

For the first time, students in a Knight Center MOOC (massive open online course) will be viewing some lessons in 360 degrees through interactive videos. In our newest MOOC, “Introduction to Immersive Journalism: Virtual Reality and 360 Video,” we will be using some of the very tools taught in the course. Watch this video of MOOC instructor, professor Robert Hernandez, explaining course content using 360 video. Immersive journalism, based on virtual reality and 360 video, has been used around the world as a new narrative format that allows reporters to tell stories and, at the same time, bring the audience to the places they want to show, as never before. It’s a skill that is in demand within news organizations that have experimented or want to start experimenting with the new tool that allows for immersive storytelling.

https://knightcenter.utexas.edu/00-17990-learn-about-virtual-reality-and-360-video-knight-center%E2%80%99s-free-online-course-intro-immersiv

Share on Facebook

How online games are helping prepare local students for STEM careers

February 20th, 2017

by Kendi A. Rainwater, Times Free Press

Learning Blade was developed by Chattanooga entrepreneurs Shelia and Dane Boyington, both chemical engineers, and it is being used in most of Hamilton County’s middle schools and more than 525 schools statewide. Thanks to the Tennessee STEM Innovation Network and through the support of lawmakers, Learning Blade is now available to any middle school in the state at no cost. Shelia Boyington said she and her husband developed the program to meet a need, as many students across the state are graduating high school not prepared for the increasing number of well-paying STEM jobs in the region. “This program exposes them to those jobs,” she said, adding that interesting kids in STEM fields at a young age is one of the best ways to strengthen the workforce.

http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/local/story/2017/feb/10/learning-blade-works-prepare-middle-school-st/412154/

Share on Facebook