Online Learning Update

June 10, 2017

Self-Directed Learning: Exploring the Digital Opportunity

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:07 am

by Mary Grush, Campus Technology

Virginia Commonwealth University associate professor of English W. Gardner Campbell considers why we should explore our digital opportunities for self-directed learning. “So at some point, self-directed learning, which is now an absolutely vital concept in higher learning, has to be considered as part of a larger conceptual framework. The larger framework incorporates the institution, the curriculum, and the faculty that you asked about. That larger framework should stress the role of expert-directed study and expert-facilitated encounters, especially in opportunities for self-directed learning.”

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/22/exploring-the-digital-opportunity-for-self-directed-learning.aspx

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“In future, education will be either blended or fully online” Interview with Amit Goyal, edX India

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

by Praggya Guptaa, Governance Now

MOOCs will not replace universities, but rather enhance the quality of education by incorporating blended learning. In future, education will be either blended or fully online. Pure face-to-face education will exist only in history books. In blended classrooms, the on-campus university course can leverage the power of MOOCs to free up classroom time for interactive collaboration and discussion, testing and problem-solving. This model creates better efficiencies in the classroom and can foster a better quality of education overall for the money.

http://www.governancenow.com/views/interview/in-future-education-will-be-either-blended-or-fully-online-amit-goyal-edx-digitisation

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Asynch Delivery and the LMS Still Dominate for Online Programs

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

While a recent research project examined enrollment patterns for online courses, a new survey is looking at broader questions related to online programs, this one based on responses from “chief online officers.” Produced by Quality Matters and Eduventures, the “Changing Landscape of Online Education (CHLOE)” offers a “baseline” examination of program development, quality measures and other structural issues. Most institutions rely on asynchronous delivery for their fully online programs. In fact, 95 percent of larger programs (those with 2,500 or more online program students) are “wholly asynchronous” while 1.5 percent are mainly or completely synchronous. About three-quarters (73 percent) of mid-sized programs (schools with between 500 and 2,499 online program students) and 62 percent of smaller programs are fully asynchronous.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/22/asynch-delivery-and-the-lms-still-dominate-for-online-programs.aspx

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June 9, 2017

Harvard HMX Offers Dose of Medical School Training in Online Format

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:08 am

by Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

Harvard University is issuing certificates for anybody who passes one or more of the same online courses that are also taken by incoming students prior to starting their Harvard Medical School curriculum and used by the institution’s faculty to “flip” their classrooms. The courses make up the university’s new “HMX” program, consisting of online instruction for medical education. The HMX classes each last 10 weeks and cover physiology, immunology, genetics and biochemistry. Rather than using “traditional lectures and PowerPoint slides,” these programs introduce real-world scenarios, animation, concept videos, notetaking guides, assessments, interactive components and videos that take participants into clinical settings. The price of each course is $800, or $1,000 when taken two at a time, or $1,800 when all four are taken simultaneously.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/05/harvard-hmx-offers-dose-of-medical-school-training-in-online-format.aspx?admgarea=news

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Google’s New AI Is Better at Creating AI Than the Company’s Engineers

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

by Tom Ward, Futurism

At its I/O ’17 conference this week, Google shared details of its AutoML project, an artificial intelligence that can assist in the creation of other AIs. By automating some of the complicated process, AutoML could make machine learning more accessible to non-experts. The AutoML project focuses on deep learning, a technique that involves passing data through layers of neural networks. Creating these layers is complicated, so Google’s idea was to create AI that could do it for them.

https://futurism.com/googles-new-ai-is-better-at-creating-ai-than-the-companys-engineers/

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Southern Cross University education masters borrows from MBA to teach leadership

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Tim Dodd, Financial Review

As teachers and school principals are faced with increased challenges in leading people and managing organisations Southern Cross University (SCU) has added elements of an MBA degree to a postgraduate course for teachers. The university’s new online master of education, which commences in July is meant to give senior teachers the skills to be a school principal or department head. “Most masters of education do not offer MBA components,” said Jo-Anne Ferreira, who heads SCU’s school of education.

http://www.afr.com/leadership/management/business-education/southern-cross-university-education-masters-borrows-from-mba-to-teach-leadership-20170519-gw8rbj

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June 8, 2017

Vinton Cerf’s 6 considerations for keeping the IoT safe

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am
by  Matt Leonard, GCN
Reliability: ”I don’t think anyone wants to use these devices if they’re not reliable.” The light switch has worked for years, don’t make it harder.
Ease of use: ”It should actually make your life easier as opposed to harder.”
Safety: ”Nobody would buy and install a device if they didn’t think it was safe.”
Privacy: “Imagine webcams in the house that are accessible remotely by unauthorized parties.”
Autonomy: “You don’t want your house to stop working if it is disconnected from the internet.”
Interoperability: “If we’re going to build ensembles of these devices and expect to manage them in a sensible way, then we have to have standards that allow for interoperability.”
Cerf said bugs in IoT devices will likely be fixed the same way bugs in computers or mobile devices are handled: by downloading new software. Yet that is not as simple as it sounds, he said.
https://gcn.com/articles/2017/05/09/iot-authenication-vint-cerf.aspx
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9 Steps to Keeping Student Data Safe

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by Matthew Lynch, tech Edvocate

Technology makes accessing student data rather easy. However, all student data needs to be maintained in a confidential manner to protect students’ rights, security, and dignity. At the same time, federal and state laws and guidelines may have certain rules regarding the type of safety precautions that must be taken regarding this data, but they might not specify specific tasks. Unfortunately, not all schools may provide a higher level of interpretation of those guidelines and laws. Therefore, there some steps need to be considered when protecting student data.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/9-steps-keep-student-data-safe/

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Online degrees allow opportunities for police officers

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am
by Clay Neely, Noonan Times-Herald
That’s where continuing education came in. Flash forward to two weeks ago, and Hodges was among 471 recent graduates of American Public Education System –  a for-profit, online learning institution that is composed of American Military University (AMU) and American Public University (APU). But for him, the quest of higher education isn’t just for resume-building. “What you learn from the academy and the streets can never be replaced by college,” he said. “But the biggest thing that college opens is a broader understanding about why things work the way they do.”
http://times-herald.com/news/2017/05/online-degrees-allow-opportunities-for-police-officers
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June 7, 2017

Report Proposes Ethical Practices for Use of Predictive Analytics in Higher Ed

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

The productive use of predictive analytics in higher education is almost a foregone conclusion. Being able to predict whether a student will enroll in your institution, stay on track in his or her studies or need extra support to succeed seems like just the kind of data that can help colleges and universities meet their enrollment goals, better target recruiting efforts and more strategically apply their institutional help. However, the application of data in this way also cries out for a set of ethical practices to prevent its abuse. For example, the same data that can help students succeed could also be used to pinpoint which low-income students not to bother recruiting because their chances of enrollment are smaller than more affluent candidates.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/17/report-proposes-ethical-practices-for-use-of-predictive-analytics-in-higher-ed.aspx

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8 Tips for Lecture Capture on a Shoestring

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

Whether you’re flipping your courses, creating videos to help your students understand specific concepts or recording lectures for exam review, these tips can help you optimize your production setup on a tight budget. Burriel oversees what he calls the “media ecosystem” at his university, a topic on which he speaks nationally. While Oregon State maintains media production units for creating high-quality video, these days, he noted, “everyone’s got a video creation device in their pocket.” In fact, he estimates that 90 percent of the video creation done on campus is user-generated content, whether it’s faculty making videos to help students learn, students creating videos for assignments, webinar production or extension service tutorials made for people out in the field.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/17/8-tips-for-lecture-capture-on-a-shoestring.aspx

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Studying With Celebrities In Master Class: Making On LIne Education Worth It

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by Chris Brandt, University Herald

Imagine having a design class with Frank Gehry, or a cooking lesson with Gordon Ramsay, or a scriptwriting class with Aaron Sorkin – that would be pure heaven. This is not impossible anymore because Master Class, an online learning platform, offers such classes. The question, however, is if it is worth it. Master Class is an online learning platform in the tradition of Khan Academy, Udemy, and other MOOCs platforms. What makes it stand out, however, is that for $90, anyone can have lifetime access to a class taught by big names in different disciplines.

http://www.universityherald.com/articles/75229/20170519/studying-with-celebrities-in-master-class.htm

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June 6, 2017

Building Support for Online Learning at Small Residential Institutions

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

Big time online learning gets all the press. Read the Digital Learning Compass report on online education enrollment and you will see lots of big numbers. In 2015 over 6 million students took at least one online course – 5 million undergrad, a million grad – with bout half of these distance learners are taking courses exclusively online. The real online learning story, however, is not about size. It’s about change. The big online learning story of 2017 is not about the few schools that offer distance education to ten of thousands of students. Rather, it is about the impact that online education can have on teaching and learning at every institution. And this impact may be greatest at our most traditional residential colleges and universities.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/building-support-online-learning-small-residential-institutions

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Seven things we learned about WannaCry

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Ian Sherr, CNet

The cyberattack is one of the worst of its kind in history, disrupting businesses, hospitals and government agencies. Here’s everything we know so far. This attack will continue for a while. This is perhaps the most frustrating part of WannaCry. Because it spreads through file-sharing technology built into the Windows software that powers most of the world’s PCs, and because people are slow to update their computers, it’s likely we’ll be feeling the reverberations of this attack for some time. The Shadow Brokers, the hackers behind the NSA leak that arguably helped kick off this mess, say they have more unreleased hacking tools. The group said that starting in June, it will begin a “Data Dump of the Month” service. Think of it as a wine of the month club — except, y’know, less fun.

https://www.cnet.com/news/seven-things-we-learned-about-wannacry-microsoft-windows-ransomware-nsa/

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Do Mobile Devices in the Classroom Really Improve Learning Outcomes?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by Matthew Lynch, tech Edvocate

Mobile devices as teaching tools are becoming a more and more common part of the American education experience in classrooms, from preschool through graduate school. As far back as 2010, reports were surfacing that mobile apps are not only engaging, but educational, for children as young as preschool. PBS Kids, in partnership with the US Department of Education, found that the vocabulary of kids ages three to seven who played its Martha Speaks mobile app improved up to 31%. Abilene Christian University conducted research around the same time that found math students who used the iOS app “Statistics 1” saw improvement in their final grades. They were also more motivated to finish lessons on mobile devices than through traditional textbooks and workbooks.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/mobile-devices-classroom-really-improve-learning-outcomes-2/

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June 5, 2017

Penn State Entrepreneurship courses available to campuses through Digital Learning Co-op

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:08 am

by Carolyn Gette, Penn State

Three core courses required for students enrolled in the Intercollege Minor in Entrepreneurship and Innovation (ENTI) are now available to all Penn State campuses through the Digital Learning Cooperative, an administrative system that assists campuses and colleges in the sharing of online, hybrid and video courses. Through the use of the cooperative, any campus can now expect regular access to the 9 credits that form the core of the ENTI minor curriculum: MGMT 215: The Entrepreneurial Mindset; ENGR 310: Entrepreneurship Leadership; and MGMT 425: New Venture Creation. No transfer of funds from campuses will be required for access to these courses, as the regular credit-hour fees for the Digital Learning Cooperative have been waived.

http://news.psu.edu/story/468665/2017/05/17/academics/entrepreneurship-courses-available-campuses-through-digital

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Should There Be a Universal Skills Measurement System?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Lauren Dixon, Talent Economy

And as talent becomes more of a focal point for businesses looking to acquire competitive advantage, should there be a more universal system for defining and tracking workers’ skills, instead of focusing on jobs? Credly, for its part, uses badges to display skills earned. Formal assessments are one way that talent can gain badges, or a manager can follow a defined rubric when issuing various badges internally. Finkelstein said a universal system like this means the employer would rely less on self-reporting of skills proficiency from candidates. Employers would also be able to focus on the skills needed for a job, rather than college degrees acquired, which don’t necessarily indicate one’s ability to perform in the business world. Job descriptions could also be more focused on skills and be more searchable than they currently are. A combination of these factors would make it easier to source talent both externally and internally, Finkelstein said.

http://www.talenteconomy.io/2017/05/17/universal-skills-measurement-system/

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Report: Female professors seeking leadership roles face inherent biases

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Pat Donachie, Education Dive

Female faculty members at colleges and universities who hope to achieve greater professional success and leadership are consistently stymied in male-dominated environments where they must work far harder than men to receive similar awards, according to a new study conducted by a professor at Florida Atlantic University’s College of Business. The study examined appointments to named professorships by gender using a sample of 511 faculty from research universities throughout the country, finding women were less likely to be awarded such positions and are inadequately appointed to endowed chairs in return for their significant scholarly work. The biases will be difficult to excise because they are so embedded in the college culture, according to the researchers, but they are hopeful that the study will lend more insight into the issue.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/report-female-professors-seeking-leadership-roles-face-inherent-biases/443140/

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June 4, 2017

The Rising “Phigital” Student: Education must adapt now to accommodate Gen Z — but how?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by Maris Stansbury, edCircuit

A major generational clash is underway, says a foremost expert, and it’s affecting all industries, including education. The clash is coming from so-called Gen Z, the first generation to be considered fully “phigital” — unwilling or unable to draw a distinction between the physical world and its digital equivalent. So what does that mean for educators? Well, buckle up and hold on.

http://www.edcircuit.com/rising-phigital-student/

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The Coming of the Phigital Generation — and Reality

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

by Michael Stoner, Inside Higher Ed

For marketers, preparation for the arrival of a new group on campus involves supporting IT and curricular initiatives as well as optimizing websites and other marketing channels. “Phigital” is the recently coined name for the upcoming generation of students who don’t draw a distinction between the physical and digital worlds and are comfortable in both. [Or maybe that’s apparently comfortable in both.] We shouldn’t be surprised that people, raised in a world of mobile devices and technology, have expectations about how organizations should function. Phigitals wonder why all organizations don’t just “get” mobile and optimize for it in every aspect of their operations. After all, when you can buy stuff on Amazon’s app and have it delivered in the afternoon (assuming you live in the right place, of course), you begin to wonder why every aspect of your life doesn’t function in the same way.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/call-action-marketing-and-communications-higher-education/coming-phigital-generation-%E2%80%94-and

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‘Glacial Progress’ on Digital Accessibility

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By Carl Straumsheim, Inside Higher Ed

New data from Blackboard show that the most common types of course content that students use on a daily basis — images, PDFs, presentations and other documents — continue to be riddled with accessibility issues. And while colleges have made some slight improvements over the last five years, the issues are widespread. The findings come from Ally, an accessibility tool that Blackboard launched today (the company in October acquired Fronteer, the ed-tech company behind the tool). Ally scans the course materials in a college’s learning management system, comparing the materials to a checklist based on the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 AA, developed by the World Wide Web Consortium’s Web Accessibility Initiative. If any issues arise, the tool flags them and suggests accessible alternatives.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/05/18/data-show-small-improvements-accessibility-course-materials

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