Online Learning Update

July 10, 2013

Online learning classes proving popular with Stark students

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Saimi Bergmann, Canton Republican

Rich Rohn gets up before the sun, works a nine- or 10-hour day, then goes to college. Fortunately, this busy Massillon father of two can take his Malone University classes by simply walking upstairs to his home office. “I’m usually on the computer until midnight every night,” said Rohn, assistant superintendent for the Legends of Massillon golf course in Massillon. Rohn, 33, is one of a growing number of Stark County students taking college classes via computer, prompting Malone and other schools to offer more courses, even entire degrees, online. “Nationally, the adult learning population is the fastest growing student population,” said Laura Foote, who teaches online classes for Malone.

http://www.cantonrep.com/news/x997477311/Online-classes-proving-popular-with-Stark-students#axzz2YBglYETJ

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No Right Answers

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By Ry Rivard, Inside Higher Ed
Some students taking free classes from Coursera may never know the right answers. A University of Michigan professor teaching one of the company’s massive open online courses, or MOOCs, told students this week he could not provide them with correct answers to questions they get wrong because doing so would reduce efficiency.  The professor’s decision is prompting additional questions by critics of MOOCs about their ability to provide quality teaching.

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2013/07/05/one-mooc-professor-wont-let-students-know-right-answers

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Increased online courses offer student flexibility

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

Trey Braunecker, SIU Daily Egyptian

The university offers a variety of online classes for students who do not have the time or opportunity to complete classes on campus. Online classes give students the option to pursue an education from almost anywhere they want, said Dan Mussa, director of Computer-Aided Math Instruction and a visiting assistant instructor of mathematics. He said the convenience of completing credit hours without having to step into a classroom helps students fulfill academic requirements for graduation, while still giving them the freedom to work on other projects outside of the university. Mussa said the math department first started offering online courses last summer when it opened a college algebra course. He said since then, the university has broadened its range of online classes, offering courses such as intermediate algebra, contemporary mathematics and business calculus.

http://www.dailyegyptian.com/06262013_online_tb/#axzz2Y0vh6a6q

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July 9, 2013

MOOCs, MIT and Magic

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Tony Bates, Online Learning and Distance Education Resources

Professor Anant Agarwal, the President of edX, provided some facts and figures about edX MOOCs, and mentioned that MIT had awarded a scholarship to the 15 year old Mongolian student who scored 100% on the final exam of an MIT MOOC course (although he will not receive credit for it). He pointed out that although over 150,000 learners enrolled in edXs first MOOC, 26,000 did the first activity, and 7,000 went on to complete successfully the certificate based on an online exam. (This woud provide a completion rate of approximately 28%, which is probably the most valid way to calculate completion rates for MOOCs.) More importantly, Agarwal defined the pedagogical ‘innovations’ in MOOCs as follows: active learning:

  • short video lectures interspersed with student tests/activities 
  • self-paced learning 
  • instant feedback 
  • simulations/online labs to teach design of experiments 
  • peer-to-peer learning.

http://www.tonybates.ca/2013/06/26/moocs-mit-and-magic/

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eLearning: It’s Time for a Reboot

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

BY CAROL LEAMAN,Wired

It’s been 10 years since eLearning emerged as a new category, and the market is now massive and growing: ASTD estimates that U.S. organizations spent approximately $156.2 billion on employee learning and development in 2011. And Certifyme.net estimates that eLearning is a $56.2 billion business — roughly 30% of the total L&D market. Since Jay Cross of Internet Time Group coined the term eLearning in 2004, it’s undergone a rapid evolution. Many businesses and institutions rushed to migrate their classroom training online, while others created entirely new content suited to eLearning. I remember the first online learning course I had to take – wow! I could do it on my own time, as long as I got it done within the week. And when I hadn’t watched the video by Wednesday I got a reminder. Fantastic! It seemed like a no-brainer to me.

http://www.wired.com/insights/2013/06/elearning-its-time-for-a-reboot/

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What Can MOOCs Do for American Higher Education?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

by Joshua Wyner, HuffPost Aspen Institute

MOOCs–that is, massively open online courses–are only two years old. But many thought leaders are already suggesting that these free classes, which are being produced largely by elite U.S. colleges and universities, can dramatically increase access to a high quality college education domestically and abroad.  That’s important, of course. Just as important, though, is the potential of MOOCs to do what matters most for our nation’s higher education system: improve the value proposition of college, by making it cheaper for students to earn a valuable degree and more likely that they will do so. In the face of state budget cuts, colleges have continued to jack up tuition at a rate that far exceeds inflation, driving American student debt above $1 trillion. At the same time, only half of students who start working toward a degree ever receive one. And we lack systemic ways to determine whether those are degrees of quality–that is, whether students learned what they needed to.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joshua-wyner/what-can-moocs-do-for-ame_b_3535108.html

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July 8, 2013

Adaptive online learning program fills math, science skills gap

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Heather Ashbach, University of California

“There are a lot of reasons a student may struggle in certain subjects, including teacher readiness, textbook inadequacies and reliance on standardized testing,” says Jean-Claude Falmagne, UC Irvine research professor of cognitive sciences as well as founder and chairman of the privately held ALEKS Corp. “ALEKS addresses each of these concerns. It’s a competent teaching assistant using content written by university faculty and Ph.D.s. Instead of being a standardized, one-size-fits-all test, it assesses precisely each student’s current knowledge state – finding out exactly what they know and, more importantly, what they’re ready to learn.” The program is an integral part of UC Irvine’s classroom and online algebra and precalculus courses. Online versions have reached more than 1,000 students through Summer Session and are currently available as MOOCs on Coursera. They receive American Council on Education credit and are being considered for adoption by other universities.

http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/news/article/29714

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How The Best Online Tools Fit Into Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Jeff Dunn, Edudemic

There are some very popular tools and apps out there. We showcase a boatload of them here on Edudemic. But there’s been a growing trend of figuring out how to actually integrate all these together and how to effectively use the best web tools to enhance learning in the classroom. One of the most powerful visualizations to date has been the fabulous Padagogical Wheel (with an ‘a’ instead of an ‘e’) that shows how to integrate iPads into just about everything like SAMR and beyond. Now there’s a new visual guide that you should check out. It’s a pyramid that I spotted on Pinterest here. It shows you exactly where each of the best web tools and apps fit into Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy. The pyramid lists off the icons of the most well-known tools that you are probably already using. Then it organizes them into the six levels of the taxonomy.

http://www.edudemic.com/2013/07/best-web-tools-blooms-digital-taxonomy/

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MOOCs align with the University of Houston values

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

By The Daily Cougar Opinion Desk

At a time when the world is quickly transitioning to the World Wide Web with online shopping, dating and social networking, it was only a matter of time before college students saw an online higher education. Joining the web migration, UH announced that professors will begin contributing to a massive open online course company known as Coursera earlier this summer. Coursera, one of the four companies leading the massive open online courses revolution, currently offers 391 not-for-credit courses for free online to anyone with access to a computer, according to its website. UH is joining eighty-three colleges that are contributing content as partners.

http://thedailycougar.com/2013/07/03/moocs-align-with-uh-values/

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July 7, 2013

UC, CSU leaders still back online courses, Jerry Brown says

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:09 am

by the Sacramento Bee

UC, CSU leaders still backing online courses, governor says It’s not normal for a governor to veto his own idea, but that’s what Gov. Jerry Brown did last week when he blue-penciled a $20 million earmark for online education at the University of California and California State University. Monday, he said university leaders assured him they would pursue online courses on their own. “I had an agreement from both the segments that they would carry out online vigorously,” Brown told reporters at an event in Sacramento. “As the leader of both governing boards, I’m actively engaged with both the University of California and the Cal State.” Brown left the $20 million in funding for the systems intact, but without tying it to online education. He said he is “completely confident” the UC and CSU systems will expand their online course offerings without a budget requirement.

http://www.sacbee.com/2013/07/02/5538819/the-buzz-uc-csu-leaders-still.html

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Online learning courses increase, offer convenience

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By Emma LeGault, University Daily Kansan

A few clicks and keyboard strokes now equals college credit, and with the ease and flexibility of online classes, more students are opting for the alternative format. A 2011 study by the Babson Survey Research Group found during fall of that year, more than six million students were taking at least one online course, which was an increase of 570,000 students from the 2010. John Griffin, a sophomore from Dallas, took an online academic success seminar last spring. “What I liked most about it was the convenience,” he said. “I didn’t have to worry about being anywhere and I could do it anywhere and work at my own pace, which was nice.” Because of that convenience and no face-to-face interaction with his teacher in a classroom, it was often easy to procrastinate or forget about assignments.

http://kansan.com/news/2013/07/01/online-courses-increase-offer-convenience/

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Dear Harvard Arts & Science professors, it is not MOOCs you have to fear

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

by David Glance, the Conversation

The fact that MOOCs have acted as a catalyst, threatening change to the tertiary education market is not necessarily because it will be MOOCs themselves that actually brings about dramatic change. The excitement about MOOCs is simply a reflection of the fact that we are at a tipping point of unsustainability in the current world order. MOOCs will be one of a range of events that will bring about change to an industry that has so far resisted the transformations happening to all other industries around it. This is outlined well by Sir Michael Barber in a report called “An Avalance is Coming” which describes the multiple threats to universities’ current monopoly on awarding degrees. The authors of the report detail a future in which there are different types of universities that offer a distinctive value through being elite, niche, hyperlocal or global. In all of this however, content is the least important part of the proposition.

http://theconversation.com/dear-harvard-arts-and-science-professors-it-is-not-moocs-you-have-to-fear-15710

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July 6, 2013

How Badges Really Work in Higher Education

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

By David Raths, Campus Technology

Digital badge initiatives at colleges and universities across the country are challenging assumptions about learning and assessment. Digital badges are getting a serious look on many university campuses because they may allow students to demonstrate a greater variety of skills. “A diploma says as much about the institution you attended as it does about you,” notes Bill Wisser, instructional designer in the Graduate School of Education (HGSE) at Harvard University (MA). “A portfolio gets more granular, and badges can show individual records of accomplishment.” But badges are only as valuable as the metadata behind them, and that is why the Mozilla Open Badges infrastructure is important, he asserts. “The badge image itself means nothing,” Wisser says. “But with Mozilla there is something behind it that links back to the issuer, the criteria it was issued under, and evidence verifying the credential.”

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2013/06/20/how-badges-really-work-in-higher-education.aspx

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MOOCs and Online Education; a real difference

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

by Jim Farmer, e-literate

Are online education and MOOC the same? Is any difference important? MOOC – Massive Open Online Course. As currently interpreted, massive meaning hundreds of thousands of student taking the course, open meaning free for the student, and online referring to the way the course is offered over the Internet. Joshua Kim, writing in Inside Higher Education, believes there is more to online education than MOOCs. Online education includes all of the online courses colleges and universities have been offering for several decades using many different instructional technologies. Kim differentiated between the two when he commented on John Tamny’s Forbes article “Online Education Will Be the Next ‘Bubble’ To Pop, Not Traditional University Learning”. Kim labeled Tamny’s work “Confused Reporting.” When Tamny is saying that online education is the next bubble he is of course not talking about the sort of online education that any of us working in the field of designing, teaching, or supporting online courses would recognize. Tamny is talking about MOOCs. Kim labels this misuse as conflation.

http://mfeldstein.com/moocs-and-online-education-a-real-difference/

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Can Business Schools Meet the Challenges of the Online Future

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

by Dominique Turpin, IEDP Global Focus

It is clear that four major forces will shape the future of business schools over the next five, ten or 20 years. The fourth factor is technology, and this will become even more important in the future. We all know that e-learning will be a massive challenge as well as a huge opportunity for business schools around the world. ‘MOOCs’ (massive open online courses) are an interesting phenomenon, and e-learning could reshuffle the cards in a way that may well change the fate of a number of schools. Technology will most likely mean that an increasing number of competitors enter the management education market, particularly executive education.

http://www.iedp.com/Blog/Can-B-Schools-Meet-Challenges

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July 5, 2013

Duke’s future in online education still in limbo

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:09 am

By Emma Baccellieri, Duke Chronicle

Following the Arts and Sciences Council’s April 25 vote, the University withdrew from a contract with Internet education company 2U and left Semester Online, a consortium of universities offering courses via the 2U platform. But the faculty’s decision not to participate in the program does not indicate a stop to the University’s involvement with online education—far from it, say faculty and administrators. “We’re just beginning,” said Thomas Robisheaux, chair of the Arts and Sciences Council and Fred W. Schaffer professor of history. “I see this as just the first step in a lively discussion where there are going to be many different solutions proposed, and we’re going to have to maybe try some—some may work, some may not work.” Although the University currently does not have concrete plans concerning its future role in online courses for credit, the discussion is still vibrant, officials noted, and Duke is pushing forward with online education in other ways.

http://www.dukechronicle.com/articles/2013/07/01/dukes-future-online-education-still-limbo

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Massive open online courses – threat or opportunity?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by the BBC

When the internet hits an industry the result is usually pretty dramatic. Newcomers with revolutionary business models blow away the old established players. Think what happened to Kodak when photography went digital, what happened to high street book shops when Amazon got going. Now it is the turn of higher education, and not even the cleverest professors can say for sure how this is going to play out. Right now this change is focused on the Mooc – shorthand for massive open online courses. The technology that allows one professor to teach not just one student but 100,000 really changes the economics of higher education”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-23069542

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77-Year-Old Is Oldest of UMUC’s Online Learning Graduating Class

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Ashley Michelle Williams, NBC 4 Washington

It’s one thing to graduate from college when you are in your 20s, but imagine trying to earn your college education when you’re in your late 70s. Douglas Kruse, 77, graduated with thousands of other students last month from the University of Maryland University College. He received a bachelor’s degree in environmental management that he earned by taking courses online. Kruse said he was determined to get his college education, and he even wants to get his master’s degree.

http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/77-Year-Old-Is-Oldest-of-UMUCs-Graduating-Class-213704281.html

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July 4, 2013

Online Learners Connecting Internationally on Udacity Global Meetup Day

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:08 am

by Udacity

The best part of Udacity — the magic ingredient that makes us truly Udacious — is our student community. We are beyond excited to connect with our students around the world on Saturday, July 20th for our Second Annual Udacity Global Meetup Day. Our Global Meetup Day will be a time for Udacians to advance their job readiness for careers in tech, and a time to celebrate our rockin’ community. On Monday, July 15th, at 12pm PDT, we will check the Meetup.com RSVPs (don’t forget to RSVP and let all your friends know about it!) and get in touch with the Meetup organizers for the ten largest international Global Meetup events.

http://blog.udacity.com/2013/06/connecting-internationally-on-udacity.html

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Higher education changed by the recession, online learning technology

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Justin Pope, Associated Press

More urgent. More crowded. More expensive. Also, more flexible and accessible to millions. That, in a nutshell, is how higher education has changed around the world in the wake of the global financial crisis that struck five years ago, and the Great Recession that followed. Here’s how it happened: Increasing financial pressures to get more people through higher education more efficiently opened the door to new technologies. Those technologies, in turn, have begun “unbundling” individual classes and degrees from traditional institutions — much in the same way iTunes has unbundled songs from whole albums and the Internet is increasingly unbundling television shows and networks from cable packages.

http://www.twincities.com/business/ci_23568740/higher-education-changed-by-recession-and-technology

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Online learning competition is rapidly changing college

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

by Joseph J. Horton, Gardner News

Is the traditional college doomed? More and more people think so. Massively open online courses (MOOCs) are threatening to shake up higher education by bringing primarily non-credit courses from college professors to the world at no cost. The California state senate, however, has just passed a bill to encourage its universities to develop MOOCs and other online courses for credit. Further evidence of rapid change is the recently announced partnership between Georgia Tech and MOOC provider Udacity to offer a master of computer science degree for just $7,000. Once fully implemented, the program will be able to educate up to 10,000 students a year and will have its set-up costs underwritten by AT&T to the tune of $2,000,000. This shows the importance to industry of training students in STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). Forecasting the future in such tumultuous times is risky, but I believe the demise of the traditional college, even for STEM education, has been exaggerated.

http://gardnernews.com/competition-is-rapidly-changing-college/

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