Online Learning Update

June 10, 2013

Design Principles for Motivating Online Learning with Digital Badges

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

by Katerina Schenke, Cathy Tran, & Daniel Hickey; Hastac

This post introduces the emerging design principles for motivating learning with digital badges. This is the third of four posts that will introduce the Design Principles Documentation Project’s emerging design principles around recognizing, assessing, motivating and studying learning. Motivation is described as the initiation or sustainment of engagement of a particular task. Badges are thought to motivate students to complete tasks, learner more deeply, and make good decisions about what to learn next. Badges may also motivate communities to work together towards shared learning outcomes.

http://hastac.org/blogs/kschenke/2013/06/05/design-principles-motivating-learning-digital-badges

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Integrate iPads Into Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy With This ‘Padagogy Wheel’

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

by Jeff Dunn, Edudemic

You’re going to want to turn on your printer and fire up a PDF viewer. This is just that good. It’s called the Padagogy Wheel and it offers a fantastically useful perspecitve on how to figure out which iPad apps work with Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy. Created by Allan Carrington, this thing is a monster and deserves some focused attention. So I’d make a personal plea to save the hi-res image (below) or print out the PDF (available here) and then spend your long weekend closely examining this thing. The Padagogy Wheel takes an expanded approach Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy and offers 62 iPad apps that fit into the organized chaos that is Bloom’s. On Allan’s blog (check it out, it’s great!) he explains that not every app is perfect and that there’s always room to improve. So I’d recommend you check out his blog and offer up your comments, questions, etc. as he ha spent a pantload of time on this thing and I just know you’d enjoy learning about this if you haven’t already.

http://www.edudemic.com/2013/05/integrate-ipads-into-blooms-digital-taxonomy-with-this-padagogy-wheel/

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June 9, 2013

Georgia colleges look at new ways to use online courses

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Laura Diamond, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Georgia college leaders joined a new partnership to explore how they can best use the fast-growing market of free online courses. he University System of Georgia announced Thursday it is one of 10 public systems and universities taking a collaborative look at how massively open online courses (MOOCs) could increase access and make a degree less expensive. MOOCs started almost two years ago to offer quality online college courses from elite schools, including Georgia Tech and Emory University. Millions of people worldwide signed up.

Lately the focus has been on turning these free courses into college credit. Georgia colleges could use the courses to reduce the expense of a degree and offer students more flexible class schedules, said Houston Davis, the system’s chief academic officer.

http://www.ajc.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/georgia-colleges-look-at-new-ways-to-use-online-co/nX9DL/

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Retention and Intention in Massive Open Online Courses

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Daphne Koller, Andrew Ng, Chuong Do, and Zhenghao Chen; EDUCAUSE Review

We believe that retention in MOOCs should be evaluated within the context of learner intent, especially considering the varied backgrounds and motivations of students who choose to enroll. When viewed in the appropriate context, retention in MOOCs is often quite reasonable. The vast majority of students who enroll in traditional university classes enter with the explicit intent of earning a credential. MOOCs, however, cater to a substantially more diverse audience. For MOOC retention metrics to be useful, they thus must be defined and interpreted with the learner’s goals in mind. Passive lecture-watchers, for example, may go through an entire course without ever touching an assessment, yet they often derive substantial value from a MOOC without contributing to completion-based notions of retention.

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/retention-and-intention-massive-open-online-courses

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MOOCs are so unambitious: introducing the MOOPhD

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

 by Jon Dron, Athabasca University

A MOOPhD would, of necessity, be highly modular, offering student-controlled support for all parts of the research process, from research process teaching, through initial proposals, through project management, through community support, through paper writing etc. Students would choose the parts that would be of value to them at different times. Different students would have different needs and interests, and would need different support at different points along the journey. For some, they might just need a bit of help with writing papers. For others, the need might be for gaining specific skills such as statistical analysis or learning how to do reviews.  More broadly, the role of a supervisory team in modelling practice and attitudes would be embedded throughout. Importantly, apart from badges and certificates of ‘attendance’, a MOOPhD would not be concerned with accreditation.

https://landing.athabascau.ca/blog/view/285554/moocs-are-so-unambitious-introducing-the-moophd

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June 8, 2013

MOOCs Morphing Into an Online Learning Path for College Preparation

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by Anya Kamenetz, The Hechinger Report

Last week, the Massive Open Online Course platform Coursera announced a new partnership with 10 major state flagships and state university systems. While Coursera’s existing university partnerships focus on professors at elite institutions producing and sharing online versions of their courses, these partnerships are different. The focus is on incorporating existing MOOCs and newly created MOOCs—covering basic intro level and general education requirements—into the universities’ offerings, flipping the classrooms at public institutions, using MOOCs as a catalyst for collaboration on teaching and learning, and enhancing access to credit-bearing programs. One area of innovation that Coursera co-founder Daphne Koller cited is the use of MOOCs for high school dual enrollment programs. “I’m really excited about it,” she said. “There are so many studies that demonstrate the benefit to students in high school in having access to college-level material. It encourages them to go to college and complete college. But that opportunity has largely been available to the most advanced students at highly endowed school districts that have teachers that can teach college-level subjects. It’s been a very inequitable offering.”

http://diverseeducation.com/article/53683/#

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Coursera to Offer Free Online Learning Textbooks

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by: Brian Gabriel, Business Administration Information

Coursera, the leading provider of massive open online courses (MOOCs), has partnered with Chegg to offer students online textbooks to aid them in the learning experience, according to a PR Newswire release. Chegg is an online student hub that connects millions of students to online tools they can use to help with their classes. The Chegg partnership will enable Coursera to offer eTextbooks from many publishers, including Cengage, Macmillan Higher Education, Oxford University Press and SAGE. According to the company press release, students will have free partial access to online textbooks in certain Coursera courses, with the option of purchasing the full version of the eTextbook for continued learning after the course.

http://www.businessadministrationinformation.com/news/coursera-to-offer-free-online-textbooks

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Online college classes, once aimed at advanced students, target the masses

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

By Stephanie Simon, Reuters

A leading U.S. provider of online college courses on Thursday announced plans to expand into introductory level classes such as algebra and composition, marking a shift for a fledgling industry that has until now focused on specialized material. Coursera, a popular for-profit provider of massive online open courses – known as MOOCs – will host a series of basic general education classes to be developed in partnerships with 10 state university systems across the United States. “If we really want to move the needle, we can’t just stick with offering continuing education to lifelong learners,” said Daphne Koller, the Stanford computer scientist who co-founded Coursera. “We have to help people achieve degrees that will help them get a better life.”

http://news.yahoo.com/online-college-classes-once-aimed-advanced-students-target-040302928.html

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June 7, 2013

Let EdX Grow: Free online learning holds promise for the future of higher education

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By the Harvard Crimson

A little over a year ago, Harvard University made an unprecedented announcement that presented a stark challenge to those who would color it as a bastion of exclusivity and elitism. The announcement was of the creation of edX, a series of massive open online courses—commonly called MOOCs—offered in conjunction with Harvard’s Kendall Square neighbor, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. EdX seeks to use open source software to provide online education to thousands of students across the world, free of charge. We have been highly supportive of this ambitious proposal from the start, and the program’s inaugural year has only made us more optimistic about the role Harvard will play in the future of accessible higher education. Last semester, edX expanded to partner with local community colleges in an effort to broaden its reach. This past week, edX added 15 course-offering schools across the globe, including six in Asia, three in Europe, and one in Australia.

http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2013/6/1/let-edx-grow/

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Offerings in online learning are on the rise

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By George Avalos, Contra Costa Times

Education is getting a boost from a world of mobility and anytime, anyplace broadband communications. Several up-and-coming companies — including Udemy, Udacity, Khan Academy, 2U and Coursera — are offering ways for people to educate themselves online, with many courses geared toward practical knowledge and skills for a fast-changing and often forbidding economic landscape. “This is all part of lifelong learning,” said Dennis Yang, president of San Francisco-based Udemy. “People feel they must train endlessly just to stay in the game.”

http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_23335283/offerings-online-education-are-rise

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Creating globally recognised degrees

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

by Roger Y Chao Jr, University World News

Despite global interdependencies and initiatives towards globalisation and regionalisation of higher education, there are still a number of barriers to mutual recognition of higher education degrees and qualifications. Although regional and national quality assurance and qualifications frameworks have been developed and even implemented, challenges brought about by different grading systems across national and regional higher education systems – and even within the same university – need to be investigated and rationalised. How can we assess and compare the quality of learning in universities with different grading systems that are not benchmarked by similar learning outcomes? Furthermore, some universities use a bell curve to assess learning based on a student cohort and not based on a benchmarked level of learning as a whole.

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20130522072647587

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June 6, 2013

Coursera Jumps the Shark

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by Alex Usher, Higher Ed Strategy

Remember when Coursera – the world’s largest purveyor of Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) – was going to disrupt higher education, and put hundreds if not thousands of public institutions out of business? I know it’s hard to cast your mind back all of eighteen months, but try. Actually don’t. Because it’s all over. Yesterday, Coursera did a weird strategy about-face by announcing that, rather than competing with public colleges, it’s going to start competing with Blackboard instead.

http://higheredstrategy.com/coursera-jumps-the-shark/

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Sign Up for Google’s Free Online Learning Two-Week ‘Mapping with Google’ Course

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by How to Geek

Are you ready for summer school? Normally the answer to that question would be a resounding no, but this is one time you might be glad to make an exception. Starting June 10th, Google is offering a free online learning two-week course that will not only be fun, but also help you improve your Google Maps and Google Earth skills. The ‘Mapping with Google’ course will focus on three products: Google Maps, Maps Engine Lite, and Google Earth. You will also gain access to the new version of Google Maps if you have not received it through ‘invitation sign-up’ yet.

http://www.howtogeek.com/164487/sign-up-for-googles-free-online-two-week-mapping-with-google-course/

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Online Learning Classes May Force Changes at Universities

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

by Jim Randle, Voice of America

U.S. colleges face a “perfect storm” of problems as tuition costs soar, opportunities for graduates sag, and employers complain they cannot find enough workers with key technical skills. One solution may be found in the growing number and quality of online classes. The digital revolution might transform universities the way the Internet has already changed music, publishing, journalism, retail, and other businesses. “This is pretty amazing,” said the University of Virginia’s David Evans, teaching an online introduction to Computer Science. Online classes are now taught by many top universities and offer everything from computer programing to the science of cooking. Many classes are either free or inexpensive, and are updated more quickly than regular college curricula.

http://www.voanews.com/content/online-classes-may-force-changes-at-universities/1671400.html

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June 5, 2013

What’s it take to make a MOOC? Hundreds of hours, no pay

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Janice Bitters, Minnesota Daily

Chris Cramer didn’t sleep much last semester. The chemistry professor and four other University of Minnesota professors are volunteering hundreds of hours to teach free massive open online courses this summer. MOOCs are open to an unlimited number of people from anywhere in the world who have access to the Internet, and the University’s MOOCs have drawn anywhere from about 8,000 to more than 16,000 students so far. “I’ve probably put 400 hours into preparation,” said Cramer, whose course started May 20. “That’s a lot of time.”

http://www.mndaily.com/news/campus/2013/05/27/what%E2%80%99s-it-take-make-mooc-hundreds-hours-no-pay

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Georgia Tech’s Online learning CS Master’s Degree: Branded For AT&T and Udacity, Priced For Dubai and Bangalore

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

by GEORGE CHIDI, Peach Pundit

The institute has about 5000 graduate students enrolled right now, with about 2100 of them in master’s programs. About 240 of those are computer science master’s degree candidates. The inaugural class of online students — projected to be no more than 300 students — would instantly double the size of the program, at a net cost of about $3 million or one-fifteenth of the current departmental budget. If the program scales as administrators hope to 10,000 online students, with 5000 graduates contributing about half of a $6630 tuition payment every year, then Georgia Tech would bring in another $18 or $19 million a year before expenses. If it works, one might assume the school would expand it to other departments.

http://www.peachpundit.com/2013/05/29/georgia-techs-online-cs-masters-degree-branded-for-att-and-udacity-priced-for-dubai-and-bangalore/

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With state school partners, Coursera explores different uses for massive online courses

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

by Ki Mae Heussner, GigaOM

Since launching, online learning startup Coursera has focused on partnerships with elite institutions. But its latest cohort of partners includes state university systems interested in using MOOCs to improve completion rates, quality and access.  Working with 10 state schools, including the State University of New York, the University of Colorado System and the University of New Mexico, Coursera said it plans to explore various uses for massive open online courses (MOOCs). Instead of just creating open courses for anyone, the institutions plan to use MOOCs for blended learning experiences (that combine online and offline instruction), as well as to improve completion rates, quality and access at their schools.

http://gigaom.com/2013/05/29/with-state-school-partners-coursera-explores-different-uses-for-massive-online-courses/

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June 4, 2013

What my free online education taught me

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By TheStreet Staff, MSB

Expect the $475 billion market for higher ed to be cut in half by the rise of no-cost online college courses. What’s remarkable about learning intricate and complex topics, such as MapReduce and SQLite, with nothing more than a PC is not that automated grading tools work. Or that online social schooling really does substitute for much of what a traditional teacher does. Or that the same gut-wrenching collapse felt by giants including Warner Music Group, the New York Stock Exchange or Hewlett-Packard(HPQ -3.33%) await the giants of higher education. What’s stunning is how ordered, well understood and — let’s be honest — mundane the process of digital devaluation will be. Absolutely positively free online higher education is on the by-now classic explosive Web trajectory of dazzling growth. Geez, Coursera has meetups in 1,646 cities; content from 62 universities, including Yale, and investors such as Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. Heck, its teachers will have bigger followings than rock stars.

http://money.msn.com/technology-investment/post.aspx?post=89a8e6d5-0a50-4b71-8c5a-e14df0791ddb

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Offerings in online learning are on the rise

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By George Avalos, Contra Costa Times

Education is getting a boost from a world of mobility and anytime, anyplace broadband communications. Several up-and-coming companies — including Udemy, Udacity, Khan Academy, 2U and Coursera — are offering ways for people to educate themselves online, with many courses geared toward practical knowledge and skills for a fast-changing and often forbidding economic landscape. “Online learning is not new, but what is new is what is possible now with the technology that is available to us,” said Clarissa Shen, a vice president with Mountain View-based Udacity. “There is a huge amount of scale and the experience is very rich.”

http://www.registercitizen.com/articles/2013/05/28/news/feed9f6f-f7e3-4d57-89c0-f04434fde98b.txt

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Online Learning Course Platforms Offer Paid Freelance Gigs to Professors

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Steve Kolowich, Chronicle of Higher Ed

As online courses multiply outside the formal structures of academe, professors increasingly have opportunities to earn cash on the side by freelancing. Udemy, an online-education company, offers anyone, including professors, the chance to design and teach an online course. Instructors set the prices for their courses, which tend to run from about $30 to $100 per student, and take home 70 percent of the revenue. The company’s latest recruiting strategy is to enter new instructors in a contest in which one of them will win $5,000 and the right to keep 100 percent of the revenue from his or her course for as long as the professor continues to teach it. In response to that proliferation of freelance opportunities, some universities have begun to write new rules for their professors’ extracurricular teaching.

http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/online-course-platforms-offer-paid-freelance-gigs-to-professors/43971

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June 3, 2013

Lawmakers Hope to Revolutionize Education in California with Online Learning Proposals

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:12 am

by Zohreen Adamajee, Fox 40

Both Senate President Pro-Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento), and State Senator Marty Block (D-San Diego), hope California adopts a statewide system of faculty-approved online courses for credit. Block wants CSU, UC or California community college students who aren’t able to get into classes at their school to be able to find an open virtual seat in another college, as long as that particular class was approved by a faculty panel. (His bill was held in the Senate Appropriations Committee last week, but he hopes to take action on the proposal through the state budget.) During a Google+ hangout with FOX40 and viewers recently, Block said his bill will, “… speed up student time to graduation, which means less tuition in long run, which means they’re getting out to the workforce earlier.”

http://fox40.com/2013/05/31/lawmakers-hope-to-revolutionize-education-in-california-with-online-proposals/

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