Online Learning Update

June 16, 2013

MERLOT Supports Mobile online Learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:09 am

by CLASSROOM AID

Multimedia Educational Resources for Learning and Online Teaching – is a free and open online community of resources designed primarily for faculty, staff and students of higher education from around the world to share their learning materials and pedagogy. It’s a very important Open Educational Resources (OER) repository. MERLOT has developed new Mobile Learning Portal to support users to develop strategies and plans for using mobile devices in teaching and learning; to choose “best practices” for faculty and staff to design and use mobile applications; and to find existing mobile apps that can be reused and/or adapted for instructional purposes.

http://classroom-aid.com/2013/06/09/merlot-supports-mobile-learning/

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Students flock to MOOCs online learning to complement studies

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Alya Mishra, University World News

Kritika Desai, a final-year student of English literature at Jadhavpur University in Kolkata, has just enrolled for an “Introduction to Finance” on Coursera – a platform providing massive open online courses, or MOOCs. The course is offered by the University of Michigan. “In India, no university provides a combination of literature and finance. It is assumed that if you are studying literature you wouldn’t be interested in economics or finance. The MOOC has made it possible for me to study an extra subject from a top American university free of cost,” Desai told University World News. Desai is among thousands of Indians flocking to MOOC platforms offering free online courses from the world’s top universities including Stanford, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Harvard and Yale in the United States.

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20130607104833762

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A report on online learning from the University of Ottawa

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

BY TONY BATES, Tony Bates

U of Ottawa already has five programs and 76 courses that are available online, and is planning to have at least 20% of all sections in a hybrid mode (50% face-to-face and 50% online) by 2020. Although the Board felt this target was too timid, a feature of the plan is to ensure all faculty are properly trained and supported before they start developing hybrid courses. One advantage that the U of Ottawa has is that it has already in place a strong Centre for Mediated Teaching and Learning which includes a Centre for e-Learning, which means it can move more quickly to greater hybrid and online learning.

http://www.tonybates.ca/2013/06/08/a-report-on-e-learning-from-the-university-of-ottawa/

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June 15, 2013

Announcing Second Annual Udacity Global Meetup

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 1:17 am

by Udacity

Save the date! You’re invited to join the Udacity community as we gather for our Second Annual Global Meetup Day on Saturday, July 20th at 2pm PDT. The theme of the event will be to bring Udacians together on a single day worldwide to celebrate our community and our mission to educate and empower people to advance their education and careers in technology. Cities across the world will hear from one or more of Udacity’s founders and instructors. We’ll be formally organizing five official U.S. meetup locations in Palo Alto, Los Angeles, Seattle, Chicago and New York.

http://blog.udacity.com/2013/06/announcing-second-annual-udacity-global.html

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Online Learning: What it’s like to teach a MOOC

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:11 am

by Minnesota Public Radio

The University of Minnesota is leaping into free, digital classes. The massive open online courses, or MOOCs, will be open to anyone in Minnesota and anywhere else in the world. Like other schools trying MOOCs, the university is not offering college credit for the classes. Where’s the value? Is this the future of higher education, or just a novelty? We speak with Chris Cramer, a chemistry professor at the University of Minnesota who’ll be teaching one of the courses.

http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2013/06/07/daily-circuit-online-courses

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Online learning through public-private partnerships

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Maurits van Rooijen, University World News

A couple of months ago David Willetts, minister of universities and science in the United Kingdom, urged universities to invest in putting courses online. This was not just a call to action, but also an indication that the e-learning revolution has now reached the top of the UK government’s priority list. Due to all the recent changes in the British market, e-learning is certainly something that all higher education leaders should be considering as an alternative tool for expanding global reach, improving access and, of course, increasing revenue. The decline in enrolments at universities on both sides of the Atlantic indicates once more how important it is for institutions to promote innovation in order to become more competitive.

http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=2013060512224864

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Online classes provide new medium for learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

By Ray Bressette, Northwind of Northern Michigan University

Across the nation, 6.7 million higher education students have enrolled in an online course during their college career, making up a third of the nation’s college students. 70 percent of universities report that online learning plays a critical role in their long-term strategy, according to the Babson Survey Research Group in San Francisco. Northern Michigan University is one of the many schools across the country with rapid growth in online learning. During the past decade, NMU has increased their number of offered courses online from 26 in the fall of 2004 to 114 in the winter of 2013, while 146 online courses are being offered this summer to meet the high demand of online learning at NMU.

http://www.thenorthwindonline.com/?p=3867574

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June 14, 2013

MOOCs and the Humanities – an interesting debate

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 5:10 pm

by Lee Konstantinou, the Los Angeles Review of Books

The Los Angeles Review of Books invited four distinguished professors, some of whom have experience teaching online, to reflect on the risks and opportunities MOOCs present for the humanities. Our goal is not to offer any sort of final word on the phenomenon, but rather to inspire further debate and reflection. Our discussion comes in two parts. Today, we publish four initial position papers by our contributors. Tomorrow, we will publish further discussion of these initial essays. We encourage our readers to continue the discussion in the comments section as well.

http://lareviewofbooks.org/article.php?type=&id=1757&fulltext=1&media=#article-text-cutpoint

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The Minds Behind The MOOCs

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by Online College Courses

Academia is buzzing about MOOCs. What sounds like genteel name-calling is actually a powerful new medium with potential to transform the education system. Indeed, MOOCs and mooks are simply unfortunate homophones but the former is certainly ruffling feathers because their aim is to make higher education more affordable (free, in fact). These Massive Open Online Courses picked up speed and weight like a freight train, with more than five million learners in locations spanning the whole globe. Academic heavyweights like Harvard, Stanford and MIT back the courses, giving the world of online learning a much-needed boost of credibility. [see an infographic at this site]

http://www.onlinecollegecourses.com/minds-behind-moocs

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From in class to online, student reflects on 12-year journey

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By Rachel Williams, Central Florida Future

Soon-to-be UCF graduate Stephen McFarlane has witnessed a lengthy list of changes in his 12 years of undergraduate education. The biggest change McFarlane witnessed in that time frame was the increase in technology: from online classes, to communicating online, to even just carrying a laptop. “Online classes were not popular,” McFarlane said about when he first started college in 2001. “There were maybe four or five per degree.” Now, the majority of UCF students have taken online classes. During the 2012-2013 academic year, 74 percent of students took at least one of the 3,576 offered online courses, Thomas Cavanagh, associate vice president of distributed learning, said. “I love them now. If I never had to set foot in a classroom again that’d be fine,” McFarlane said.

http://www.centralfloridafuture.com/news/from-in-class-to-online-student-reflects-on-12-year-journey-1.2829113#.UbTiBefYc3U

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MOOCs – massive open online courses: jumping on the bandwidth

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Steve Caplan, Occam’s Corner

These are trying times for researchers across the globe, and I think it matters not whether one is in the UK, US or anywhere else; the lack of funding is impacting science in many ways, and not for the better. Scientists are running scared, funds for research are becoming scarce, labs are closing, tenure is being denied. I do my best not to project negativity to the burgeoning scientists (students and post-docs) in my own lab, but they are bright enough to understand what is going on: they see that a career in science is a never-ending fight to keep going. Ultimately, this is leading to the attrition of talented young scientists from the academic track. But life as an academic scientist is comprised of the triple-threat: research, teaching and service (administration). And it appears that the life of science educators is also hanging in the balance. MOOCs are on the move.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/occams-corner/2013/jun/06/moocs-massive-open-online-courses

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June 13, 2013

EdX Goes Open Source To Woo MOOC Online Learning Developers

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:11 am

by Michael Fitzgerald, Information Week

EdX, the massive open online course (MOOC) consortium started by MIT and Harvard, has released its full source code, a decision the backers hope will accelerate advances to the platform. “We want contributors,” said Rob Rubin, edX’s VP of engineering. “We’d welcome any company’s contributions and any peoples’ use of the edX platform. We’re in the very early days in the development of the technology to support learning and research about learning. Let’s all contribute to the open-source effort to be able to rapidly evolve that for the benefits of the student.” Much of the code was available previously. EdX had announced the open source of its core architecture, XBlock, in March. Stanford already has two courses hosted on edX code. 10gen, which manages the MongoDB open source database tool, developed training courses with edX source code.

http://www.informationweek.com/education/online-learning/edx-goes-open-source-to-woo-mooc-develop/240156159

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One year, 27 schools, 1 million enrollments

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

By Kath Xu, MIT Tech

It’s been a little more than a year since edX, the nonprofit online learning enterprise founded by MIT and Harvard, first launched with much fanfare and a lot of press. Now, the enterprise encompasses 27 schools from 11 countries. In the past two weeks alone, edX has added more than half of those schools. At the same time, edX has completely overhauled its website design with the intentions of making it more colorful, sleek, and ultimately more appealing to the world. Finally, last Saturday, edX released its entire source code with the hopes of making the learning platform an open source project to which the community can contribute.

http://tech.mit.edu/V133/N27/edx.html

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Coursera aims to reach more Chinese

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

by Gu Lipingcomment, China News

One of the massive online open courses (MOOCs) provider Coursera’s founders, Daphne Koller, says she is hoping to work with more Chinese universities so that they could bring more courses online and help the platform reach more people. In a recent written interview with Xinhua, Koller said that reaching the many people in China who don’t speak English and who could benefit from free access to higher education is an important goal for Coursera. She was in Vancouver, a coastal city on the Pacific coast of Canada, recently to discuss about the impact of MOOCs on teaching and learning with teachers and students from the University of British Columbia.

http://www.ecns.cn/2013/06-07/67458.shtm

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June 12, 2013

Kansas State to offer MBAs online starting in fall

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by the Associated Press

Kansas State University will offer an online Master of Business Administration program beginning in the fall. The Manhattan Mercury reports (http://bit.ly/ZOEz84) the university’s College of Business Administration will work with the Division of Continuing Education to offer the online program. It is geared toward working professionals with at least three to five years of experience. The same professors who teach graduate courses at the Manhattan campus will teach the online courses. The university says online students will be required to attend a 2-day regional student orientation. They must complete 45 credits, or as few as 30 credits depending on previous undergraduate business course work.

http://www.newschannel10.com/story/22509238/kansas-state-to-offer-mbas-online-starting-in-fall

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KU will offer 15 new online graduate programs in School of Education during next 5 years

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The University of Kansas will offer 15 new online graduate programs in the next five years, university officials said. The school plans to offer 15 new online graduate degree and certificate programs through its School of Education, with the first students enrolling in January 2014. Currently, the university offers only two online programs. “We’re positioning ourselves to move to the front of a pack that we haven’t been in the front of before,” said Rick Ginsberg, the School of Education’s dean.

http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/8fb968c16dc94ed98196c04523c6dd59/KS–KU-Online-Courses

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Self-Motivation in an Online Learning Environment

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Alex Petryck, Online Learning Tips

Thanks to the option of taking online courses a wide range of students can balance their education and their regular daily activities. Students can also create personal study programs; which is particularly useful if they have to work part-time while taking classes in order to pay for their tuition. Working adults can also combine the demands of study with their other commitments like family and career. This type of flexibility is great when we look at the options these online programs create for many students that are eager to learn. While online learning puts everything in the hands of the student to organize and do each day it can sometimes lead to lost focus and struggles with motivation.

http://onlinelearningtips.com/2013/06/04/self-motivation-in-an-online-environment/

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June 11, 2013

Cheers and fears for UBC’s massive online open courses

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:09 am

By SEBASTIAN SALAMANCA, the Hook

It’s been nine months since the University of British Columbia joined a select group of postsecondary institutions to offer “massive online open courses,” also known as MOOCs. While several parties are pleased with how the free web classes taught by UBC professors have helped to improve access to education, others have expressed anxieties about the long term financial implications to the higher ed system. “MOOCs have changed the frontiers of education,” said Daphne Koller, the founder of Coursera, a company which partners with universities to offer MOOCs and a professor of computer science at Stanford University. Koller attended a panel last Friday which discussed how UBC’s pilot MOOCs have fared. “Now, you can take the same learning outcome that you can get from a large lecture class and provide that same quality experience to hundreds of thousands around the world.”

http://thetyee.ca/Blogs/TheHook/2013/06/03/UBC-MOOC-Panel/

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Universities Bolster MOOCs for Online Learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By Mary Beth Marklein, CIO-Today

Public universities and systems in nine states say they’ll join a push to greatly expand and improve online learning. Coursera, a Silicon Valley-based company, is [says] that it will partner with university systems in Colorado, Georgia, New York, Tennessee and Texas to develop and evaluate the potential of technology that is fueling dramatic changes in how higher education is designed and delivered. Partnerships with several state flagship universities also are being announced, bringing to more than 70 the number of schools or systems working with the company. Coursera is one of a handful of young companies or non-profit groups that offer an array of free, non-credit, college-level courses to anyone who has an Internet connection and a desire to learn.

http://www.cio-today.com/story.xhtml?story_id=0030003H6P7I

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MOOC Students Who Got Offline Help Scored Higher, Study Finds

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

by Steve Kolowich, Inside Higher Ed

One of the first things researchers have learned about student success in massive open online courses is that in-person, one-on-one teaching still matters. For online learners who took the first session of “Circuits & Electronics,” the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s hallmark MOOC, those who worked on course material offline with a classmate or “someone who teaches or has expertise” in the subject did better than those who did not, according to a new paper by researchers at MIT and Harvard University. The research, published this week by the journal Research & Practice in Assessment, is one of the first peer-reviewed academic studies based on data from a MOOC. Advocates for the massive online courses have cited their potential value as engines of educational research.

http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/mooc-students-who-got-offline-help-scored-higher-study-finds/44111

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June 10, 2013

As Data Floods In, Massive Open Online Courses Evolve

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Tom Simonite, Technology Review

As online education companies track students’ behavior and experiment with different delivery methods, assumptions about effectiveness are being challenged. Several education startups that launched in 2012 attracted millions of students with relatively simple courses. Analyzing which parts of them worked could help them maintain popularity after the initial rush of interest. In 2012, education startups attracted millions of students—and a surge of interest from universities and the media—by offering massive open online courses, or MOOCs. Now some core features of these wildly popular courses are being dissected, enabling the course providers to do some learning of their own. As these companies analyze user data and experiment with different features, they are exploring how to customize students’ learning experiences, and they are amassing a stock of pedagogical tricks to help more students finish their courses.

http://www.technologyreview.com/news/515396/as-data-floods-in-massive-open-online-courses-evolve/

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