Online Learning Update

April 17, 2017

UK UNIVERSITIES ARE GOING ONLINE TO BEAT BREXIT

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:07 am

by Management Today

Higher education’s dual dilemma of Brexit and a squeeze on student visas is proving a catalyst for innovation in an otherwise conservative sector, says the founder of EdTech start-up Keypath. Under pressure to curb migration, and despite the concerns of industry and universities, the government has been reluctant to remove international students from the official migration statistics or loosen visa rules that put some of the world’s best and brightest students off studying here. Brexit too, with a 9% decline in EU student numbers over the past six months alone, is adding further pressure on our global standing. In response to some of these challenges, UK universities are accelerating their investment in online degrees. Whilst we must continue to address falling numbers of international students arriving on campus, the growth of high-quality digital degrees presents an enormous opportunity for businesses in the UK and for individuals looking to work, earn and learn.

http://www.managementtoday.co.uk/uk-universities-going-online-beat-brexit/future-business/article/1429896

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The 7 Deadly Sins of Online Learning (And 7 Ways to Repent)

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By Sydney Johnson, EdSurge

Education technology is riddled with temptations and false promises. But if you ask Mark Brown, a professor and director of the National Institute for Digital Learning at Dublin City University in Ireland, problems such as falling for hype around new technology is an absolute moral dilemma. He’s caved in before. “I have a personal confession,” Brown admitted in his keynote address at OLC Innovate happening this week in New Orleans. “I am a very big sinner.” Yet like any confessional, Brown also offered ways to repent from what he called “the seven deadly sins of online learning.” Feeling a bit guilty ourselves (and perhaps inspired by the home of the Saints), we caught up with Brown afterwards for some advice on ways to return to the righteous path.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-04-06-the-7-deadly-sins-of-online-learning-and-7-ways-to-repent

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Thinking Small About Online Learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

Online programs can be a vehicle to highlight differentiation. What school, department, program, or area of research does your school do better than anybody else?What degree programs are you most proud? What areas of teaching and knowledge creation have you build a critical mass of faculty? Building online programs around your strengths is a way not to compete with the Liberty’s, WGU’s, and SNHU’s of the world. My advice is that you don’t want to compete with these schools anyway. They have figured out the efficiencies around scale. Competing against the recruitment and student services and course development and instructional engines that they have built is a losing proposition. So do something different. The economics of online education mean that it is possible to build a very small program that is financially sustainable. If the focus is institutional differentiation and program quality – economic sustainability should be enough.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/thinking-small-about-online-learning

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April 16, 2017

How Threats to Indirect Research Payments Could Make Universities Less Willing to Gamble on Science

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:09 am

By Paul Basken, Chronicle of Higher Ed

Last week the Trump administration made clear that its proposal to cut billions of dollars in research spending involved entirely eliminating the payments that universities use to help pay for those science buildings. The payments are known as indirect cost reimbursements. After an agency such as the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation awards a grant for a research project, it tacks on an additional amount to cover administrative and facility costs at the university performing the work.

http://www.chronicle.com/article/How-Threats-to-Indirect/239736

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Online and Digital Education: Enhancing Access to Higher Education in the 21st Century

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Vistasp Karbhari, The EvoLLLution

The barriers to extending access to higher education are lower than ever with the vast and rapid evolution of online education opportunities, but it’s up to institutions to adopt these offerings and create new pathways to postsecondary credentials.The 1862 Morrill Land Grant Act is often considered the landmark in the democratization of higher education, assuring postsecondary access to more than the privileged few and ensuring, simultaneously, the education of scholars and the training of a highly skilled workforce. Over 150 years later we need to re-envision the implementation of the concepts put forward through the grand purpose of that step and the series of Acts that followed (Hatch Act of 1887, Morrill Act of 1890, Smith-Lever Act of 1914) in light of today’s technology and needs.

http://evolllution.com/revenue-streams/distance_online_learning/online-and-digital-education-enhancing-access-to-higher-education-in-the-21st-century/

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What is Mobile Learning?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Megan Poore, Tomorrow’s Professor

Sometimes referred to simply as ‘mlearning’, mobile learning can be described as ‘anywhere, anytime’ learning that is not fixed in time (by schedule) or space (by location) and that is supported by digital technologies. Put differently, it is learning that is relevant to the context and location of the student. Mobile learning has two main elements: (1) the learner, and (2) a portable digital device (or devices) through which he or she accesses content. Such devices include mobile phones (both ‘smart’ and ‘dumb’), digital cameras, voice recorders, tablet devices (such as iPads), laptops and netbooks, video cameras, and MP3 players. Portable digital devices can support a variety of files and functions, including audio, video, and text files, and recording, wireless internet, news content, feeds, email, social media and other apps, and GPS and geolocation – all of which can be used for ‘learning on the go’. Internet connectivity is not essential for mobile learning although such connectivity is fast becoming the norm. Nevertheless, much effective mobile learning can still be achieved with devices that simply record or ‘play back’ content and information.

https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1556

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April 15, 2017

Pew data suggests adult learners lacking in digital skills

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:09 am

by Roger Riddell, Education Dive

A Pew Research Center report titled “Digital Readiness Gaps” suggests many adults aren’t prepared to use the digital tools necessary for online learning. According to eCampus News, 33% of adults are reluctant when it comes to their ability to use computers and other electronic devices, 31% are “cautious clickers” who are confident in their abilities but unlikely to pursue learning opportunities on- or offline, and 14% are unprepared for online learning all together. When it comes to those who are prepared, only 17% are confident in their digital skills, and 40% of that group suggested the majority of their learning occurs online.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/pew-study-adult-learners-digital-skills-online-learning/439634/

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GOP Rep. Kevin McCarthy introduces bill to provide free high-tech courses to vets

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Donovan Slack , USA TODAY

House Republican Majority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy says veterans need more educational opportunities that meet the demands of the fast-paced technology industry. The California lawmaker is introducing legislation Thursday giving the Department of Veterans Affairs $75 million to start a pilot program to provide accelerated computer courses in everything from robotics and basic programming to artificial intelligence and virtual reality. McCarthy, who is second-in-command to the House speaker, said the GI bill doesn’t cover many such courses and the VA approval process for changing curriculums or course offerings creates bureaucratic delays that are not conducive to the quickly changing technology fields. Under his proposal, veterans, instead of going to a traditional college — or in addition to a traditional degree — could get a shorter-term nano degree or micro credential.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2017/04/05/kevin-mccarthy-wants-va-provide-free-high-tech-courses-vets/100096868/

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3 Keys to Introducing Virtual Reality in E-Learning Courses

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

By Richard Chang, Campus Technology

Virtual reality (VR) has found its way into the educational space, and by all indications, it’s here to stay. Since VR glasses can be obtained for as low as $10 apiece, cost is becoming less of an issue, although the expensive headsets are still out of reach for many. Nonetheless, the actual applications beyond the “wow, cool” factor are still being explored. Here are three guidelines toward introducing VR in e-learning courses, according to the website E-Learning Industry.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/04/05/3-keys-to-introducing-vr-in-elearning-courses.aspx

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April 14, 2017

13 epic stats and facts from The State of Social webinar

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:12 am

by Andrew Warren-Payne, ClickZ

On March 23, ClickZ Intelligence held the webinar ‘The State of Social 2017’ in association with Tracx. As part of the presentation, a huge number of stats and facts were shared about social media, both as a whole and in relation to individual networks. Practical tips given by National Geographic’s Mia Vallo and Shell’s Matt Owen helped demonstrate to viewers how they can apply these to their strategy. So what were the most interesting stats shared in the webinar? We’ve listed 13 of our favorites below.

https://www.clickz.com/13-epic-stats-and-facts-from-the-state-of-social-webinar/110510/


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Report: AI and IoT to Change Academic and Research Libraries in Years to Come

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

In the next year or two, research data management and the valuing of the user experience will drive technology adoption in research and academic libraries. The growth of research reports through online library databases is making it easier for students, faculty and researchers to access and build upon existing ideas and work. But as libraries adopt new data formats, they must also prepare for new methods of data curation involving “cutting-edge technology.” Libraries are also tapping usability principles in their digital and physical spaces to improve the quality of patrons’ interactions by making them more efficient and personalized.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/04/05/report-ai-and-iot-to-change-academic-and-research-libraries-in-years-to-come.aspx

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9 Things Educators Should Know about Gamification

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

by Matthew Lynch, tech Edvocate

Gamification has grown in popularity as teachers and educators realize the wealth of potential that games offer their students, no matter the age. Fast fading is the idea that video games are a waste of time. Children these days are among the most tech-savvy people precisely because they have been playing games on a range of devices for nearly their entire lives. Gamification can be used in many different ways. Whether your students need a better set of flashcards, hands-on experience, or a more memorable experience, gamification gives you the tools to create something that will engage your students. With all of that being said, what are the essential things that educators should know about gamification, in order to harness its full potential? Well, not to worry, we decided to do the work for you. Here are the things that educators should know about gamification.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/9-things-educators-know-gamification/

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April 13, 2017

Where the Faculty Jobs Are

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Colleen Flaherty, Inside Higher Ed

New data from CUPA-HR has been released. Median salary for full-time instructors across disciplines, whose median time in that position was three years, was $58,200. Median pay for new assistant professors was $68,000. Assistant professors, who spent about three years (median) in that position, earned just slightly more, at $68,300. Associate professors spent about six years (median) at that rank, at $79,400 annually. Full professors made $106,000, with about nine years of service. While 61 percent of instructors are women, 50 percent of assistant professors are. Women make up 44 percent of associate professors and just 31 percent of full professors. Women earn $0.96 on the dollar compared to men as instructors and $0.89 on the dollar at the full professor rank. The overall pay ratio is 0.87, because women are so underrepresented at the highest-paying ranks.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/04/06/new-cupa-hr-study-looks-faculty-hiring-pay-chairs-and-adjuncts-and-more

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The 5 stages of digital readiness for adult online students

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News

Just 17 percent of adults are in the “digitally ready” group, meaning they are confident in their online skills, have little hesitation when it comes to finding trustworthy information online. Adult learners in this group are predominantly well-off, highly-educated and are in their 30s or 40s. Two-thirds of this group has done some personal learning online in the past year, and 40 percent said most or all of their learning takes place online. Thirty-one percent of adults are in the “cautious clickers” category–they are confident in their digital skills but are less likely to engage in personal learning, offline or online. Sixty percent have used the internet for at least some level of personal learning and 23 percent have taken an online course, but 59 percent said they have concerns around trusting online information.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/news/digital-readiness-online

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Is EdTech Really Transforming Education?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by Matthew Lynch, tech Edvocate

Whether it be the implementation of the latest devices into a classroom or the use of the internet for valuable learning tools, EdTech is here to stay. Many students today may not see this transformation because they have grown up with rapidly evolving technology and the ability to have access to information at their fingertips. Teachers and parents, on the other hand, have gotten the chance to see the evolution of technology and education first hand. In just the past decade alone, the use of technology and mobile devices in the classroom has rapidly increased. No longer are the days of highlighting passages in textbooks and taking notes with a pencil. Read on at the link below for ways that EdTech is transforming education for the better.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/is-edtech-really-transforming-education/

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April 12, 2017

What will learning look like in 2025?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

BY JOHN CAVANAUGH, eCampus News

Alchemy, innovation and learning on the campus of the future. The experience of faculty in 2025 is equally transformed. Georgia Tech’s nearly decade-old experiment with a robotic teaching assistant based on the IBM Watson platform has morphed considerably. Only the most diagnostic data about each student is transmitted to faculty on dashboards organized by course.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/featured/featured-on-ecampus-news/learning-look-like-2025/

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New software tool to provide students with personalized feedback to improve learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

by UT Arlington

The University of Texas at Arlington has partnered with five international universities to create a software tool that provides timely and personalized feedback to help students adjust their studying throughout the course. The online tool, OnTask, uses data about students’ activities throughout the semester and helps instructors to provide suggestions on specific assignments and strategies that enable students to adjust their studying throughout the course in order to be more confident and successful. The tool uses data from video engagement, assessments, student information systems, electronic textbooks and discussion forums. “An important benefit of OnTask is the ability for teachers in large classrooms to still provide individual feedback to each student,” said George Siemens, executive director of The University of Texas at Arlington’s Learning Innovation and Networked Knowledge Lab.

https://phys.org/news/2017-03-software-tool-students-personalized-feedback.html

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An international online course that can get your startup career rolling

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By INDIA BUREAU, Business Insider India

The European Business School HEC Paris and Coursera have joined hands to launch an online international degree program on Innovation and Entrepreneurship. The course is designed for present and future business leaders who wish to drive innovation within their organizations or launch new ventures. Students work in teams over a six-month period on a project of choice. They will receive mentoring from experienced entrepreneurs and business leaders who will meet with them once a week. Successful graduates will be able to move their respective project into its next phase by applying for seed funding from HEC Paris, and have their project come to fruition at HEC’s incubator, based at Station F, the world’s biggest startup campus.

http://www.businessinsider.in/do-you-want-to-learn-entrepreneurship-skills-heres-an-online-course-that-can-get-your-startup-career-rolling/articleshow/57943059.cms

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April 11, 2017

The More Things Change: AAUP Releases Annual Faculty Salary Survey

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:55 am
by Colleen Flaherty, Inside Higher Ed
Pay for full-time faculty members rose 2.6 percent this academic year over last, according to “Visualizing Change,” the American Association of University Professors’ Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession. But professors shouldn’t get too excited: adjusted for inflation, that amounts to just 0.5 percent. Released today, AAUP’s annual survey finds that the average salary for full-time ranked faculty members was $80,095 in 2016-17, while the average total pay for part-time faculty members at a single institution was $20,508. Average pay for part-time faculty members teaching on a per-section basis only (excluding professors teaching part-time during phased retirement, for example) was $7,066, with serious limitations to the data.
https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/04/11/aaup-faculty-salaries-slightly-budgets-are-balanced-backs-adjuncts-and-out-state
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5 Ways Online Graduate Programs Prepare Future Teachers

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By Marian Stoltz-Loike, US News

Through online graduate education programs, future educators might learn how to incorporate digital tools into their classes.Teaching is often seen as a great field for career changers and other nontraditional students. Some pursue teaching because they want to contribute to society in a meaningful way. Others may desire to share the knowledge and expertise they gained in another setting, or they may no longer want to compete in the corporate world. Online education is an ideal way for future teachers to build the expertise they need while balancing school with work, family or other commitments. Here are five ways online graduate education programs offer value for future teachers.

https://www.usnews.com/education/online-learning-lessons/articles/2017-03-31/5-reasons-online-graduate-education-programs-build-good-teachers

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Harvard Medical School Launches First Online Certificate Program

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

By WILLIAM L. WANG, Harvard Crimson

Harvard Medical School will launch its first online certificate program this summer for people considering health careers, offering four paid courses on topics in medicine. The program, titled “HMX Fundamentals,” will be open to the public through a brief application and includes courses in physiology, immunology, biochemistry and genetics. Upon completion of a course, students will receive a PDF certificate which will not count for academic credit at Harvard. Unlike Harvard’s edX and HarvardX platforms, which offer their online classes for free, access to HMX Fundamentals will come at a cost. Tuition will cost $800 for a single HMX Fundamentals course, $1,000 for two courses, and $1,800 for all four.

http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2017/3/31/hms-launches-first-online-certificate-program/

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