Online Learning Update

May 21, 2017

How to Prepare for an Automated Future

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Claire Cain Miller, the Upshot

How do we educate people for an automated world? People still need to learn skills, the respondents said, but they will do that continuously over their careers. In school, the most important thing they can learn is how to learn. At universities, “people learn how to approach new things, ask questions and find answers, deal with new situations,” wrote Uta Russmann, a professor of communications at the FHWien University of Applied Sciences in Vienna. “All this is needed to adjust to ongoing changes in work life. Special skills for a particular job will be learned on the job.” Schools will also need to teach traits that machines can’t yet easily replicate, like creativity, critical thinking, emotional intelligence, adaptability and collaboration. The problem, many respondents said, is that these are not necessarily easy to teach.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/03/upshot/how-to-prepare-for-an-automated-future.html

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May 20, 2017

Online classes, modern textbooks helping revitalize Cherokee language

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Cherokee.org

Recent research focusing on Native American languages and how they are taught is helping revitalize the Cherokee language, in part, through online courses and modern textbooks developed by the Cherokee Nation. Using these updated methods, the Cherokee Nation’s Cherokee Language Program continues to have a far-reaching impact, with up to 3,000 students taking online courses and around 400 taking community classes each year. Participating students are from all ages and all corners of the world. “There are so many people interested in preserving the language,” said Ed Fields, an online instructor with the Cherokee Language Program who has taught courses for more than a decade. Fields teaches a 10-week, online Cherokee language course in the spring and fall each year, with participants gathering online one hour per day, two days a week. His spring course started April 10 and fall class will start Sept. 11, with registration opening Aug. 28. Through a live camera, students see Fields as he uses his own curriculum and life experiences to teach Cherokee.

http://www.cherokee.org/News/Stories/20170504_Online-classes-modern-textbooks-helping-revitalize-Cherokee-language

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Digital Thinking and the Analog Campus

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

How is digital thinking changing the analog campus? The first thing to get straight is that digital thinking is not the same as educational technology or online learning. Digital thinking is not delivery method or a set of technologies. Rather, digital thinking is a way of understanding the world. 3 things happen when you bring a digital mindset to a traditional analog institution.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/digital-thinking-and-analog-campus

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Major shift in online learning sees pedagogy in driver’s seat

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

BY SCOTT MOORE, eCampus News

Unbundled online program model focuses on pedagogy as the driver for technology decisions rather than the other way around. There is a significant shift occurring in online learning—one that puts students and pedagogy into the driver’s seat, and colleges and universities seeking new ways to increase enrollment and revenue. One barrier for colleges to capture this revenue has been the business model of the companies whose business it is to help them create and deploy online programs—they take approximately 50 percent of the program’s revenue as payment for their services (they typically handle marketing, recruiting, enrollment management, curriculum development, course design, support and technology hosting). These online program management providers (OPMs) have the benefit of reducing up-front investment, but the cost is prohibitive for many, effectively slowing down the movement to online learning.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/featured/featured-on-ecampus-news/online-learning-pedagogy/

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May 19, 2017

Students to colleges: Please use our data this way

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

BY MERIS STANSBURY, eCampus News

Younger students in colleges and universities say they’d like their personalized data to be leveraged toward a more beneficial, meaningful experience—right away. When institutions use student data, it’s usually internally and to overhaul or make adjustments to campus services year-to-year. Yet, thanks to a younger student body’s familiarity with customized communications based on personalized data, innovative institutions are trying to increase enrollment, boost retention and help place students on a career track with on-the-go data.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/big-data/students-colleges-use-data/

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4 out of 5 Companies Have Hired a Coding Bootcamp Graduate

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

By Sri Ravipati, Campus Technology

With tech skills in high-demand, coding bootcamps are doing pretty well, with Course Report estimating 18,000 graduates by the end of this year. These accelerated programs use a disruptive education model to quickly equip students with computer science (CS) skills and land jobs in the tech industry. As it turns out, four out of five companies will hire coding bootcamp graduates, according to Indeed. Overall, perceptions of coding bootcamp graduates are mostly positive. About 51 percent of survey respondents think that coding bootcamps are a good way to bring diversity into the tech industry, while 50 percent say coding bootcamps efficiently retrain employees. Perhaps for these reasons, 42 percent of hiring managers and recruiters admitted they don’t have a preference as to whether a job candidate graduated from a traditional academic institution or a bootcamp.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/03/4-out-of-5-companies-have-hired-a-coding-bootcamp-graduate.aspx

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4 No Nonsense Suggestions to Make the Most of Online Learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

By Patrick Wraight, Academy Journal Blog

Online learning is tough. The instructor is somewhere, hopefully in a quiet office with a fast internet connection. That instructor needs to bring an energy that is really different from a classroom. The content needs to be compelling and the visuals that are used really need to be on point to keep the audience’s attention. Maybe we’ll talk about everything that a virtual instructor needs to bring to another day. Today, let’s talk a little about what you, the audience, need to do to help yourself to connect with the instructor and the content. Here are four no nonsense ways to get all that you can out of your online (webinar) learning.

http://www.insurancejournal.com/blogs/academy-journal/2017/05/03/449631.htm

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May 18, 2017

The Rising “Phigital” Student: Education must adapt now to accommodate Gen Z — but how?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 11:47 am

by Maris Stansbury, edCircuit

A major generational clash is underway, says a foremost expert, and it’s affecting all industries, including education. The clash is coming from so-called Gen Z, the first generation to be considered fully “phigital” — unwilling or unable to draw a distinction between the physical world and its digital equivalent. So what does that mean for educators? Well, buckle up and hold on.

http://www.edcircuit.com/rising-phigital-student/

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Higher ed leaders: It’s time to strengthen your social media strategy

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by Autumn A. Arnett, Education Dive

A new EAB study found underrepresented minorities rely more heavily on social media to help guide their college search and selection process than do other students. The survey found 27% of first-generation students, 25% of Hispanic students, 24% of African-American students, and 24% of students from households with $60K or lower income levels report they first discovered a college on social media, compared with significantly lower percentages of legacy, Caucasian and higher-income students. According to a survey of 5,580 college-bound students released Tuesday, underrepresented students are less likely to see their family and friends as resources, and they are less likely to have opportunities to visit prospective schools in person.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/higher-ed-leaders-its-time-to-strengthen-your-social-media-strategy/441858/

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Are micro-credentials the key to personalizing professional development?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Roger Riddell, Education Dive

Micro-credentials, which offer learners the ability to master a single topic based on their needs or interests, offer administrators a way to personalize teachers’ professional development, Education Week reports. Delaware, Florida and Tennessee are among states, along with individual districts elsewhere, that have experimented with the model through providers such as the nonprofit Digital Promise, some of which allow educators to provide evidence including student work or videos and award digital badges for LinkedIn. Amid the growth in popularity, there is also increasing attention to the need for standards around rigor, value for stakeholders, oversight and teacher incentives for earning them.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/micro-credentials-key-personalized-learning-professional-development/441782/

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J-Schools Drop Accreditation

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by Paul Fain, Inside Higher Ed

Accrediting agencies are facing intense scrutiny from academics, policy makers and the general public, with the latest salvo being the decision by Northwestern University’s school of journalism and communications to ditch its accreditor. Much of the broader conversation about accreditation revolves around institutional accreditors, both national and regional, that serve as the gatekeepers for federal financial aid. Criticism tends to focus on whether the agencies are doing enough to prevent fraud and to push colleges to improve graduation and job-placement rates. Yet specialized accreditors have felt heat as well. And the tension over innovation at Medill is familiar to most accreditors, as their role of by-the-books regulators of quality often conflicts with encouraging innovation. “This is part of a re-evaluation that’s happening in the education space and in accreditation,” said Judith Eaton, president of the Council for Higher Education Accreditation, which recognizes ACEJMC. “The focus on innovation is there across the board.”

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/05/03/northwestern-and-berkeleys-journalism-schools-drop-accreditor-echoing-broader

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May 17, 2017

Solving the World’s Problems One Online Class at a Time

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:07 am

BY SOPHIA STUART, PC Magazine

Online tools can engender a greater understanding of other cultures; who doesn’t love the ability to peek into the quotidian existence of people around the globe via Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook? But what about more serious issues such as peace in the Middle East; does the internet have a place to play there? The organizers of YaLa Academy, founded in 2011 by the Peres Center for Peace and YaLa Palestine, believe it does. The online education platform provides distance learning and encourages collaboration between those from nations that have traditionally been in conflict. Students take online courses to develop skills as future peace leaders, including negotiation and conflict management, taught by various experts from organizations like the US Institute of Peace and Harvard Program on Negotiation.

http://www.pcmag.com/news/353408/solving-the-worlds-problems-one-online-class-at-a-time

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Researchers develop course for online blended learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Mike Krings, Phys.org

Across the country, classrooms are making the transition to blended learning models. Typically, students work together, with devices, with a teacher and seek information from a number of educational resources. Recently, researchers at the University of Kansas developed an online course to help teachers create blended learning environments by moving from teacher-centered to student-centered learning, which increases opportunities for personalized learning. Early evaluation of the online course indicated that teachers find the course helpful in providing planning guidance and support necessary to shift to a blended learning model of instruction. With support from the OAK Foundation, KU’s Center for Research on Learning developed the online course. It helps teachers understand blended learning, identify what they want to include in their courses and to design and implement instructional plans.

https://phys.org/news/2017-05-online-blended.html

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New study suggests gender gap may have closed in tenure track

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Pat Donachie, Education Dive

A new paper presented this weekend at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association finds that there doesn’t seem to be strong evidence of divergences in gender on the tenure track at universities, in contrast with other recent studies, according to Inside Higher Ed. The paper examined graduates 10 years after earning their Ph.D., and its authors found that scholarly publications, research and quickly acquiring a postdoctoral appointment were strong indicators of getting tenure-track professorships and receiving tenure. However, the author’s research found that women earn less in salary and take longer to finish doctoral degrees, and said that more gender inequity may become apparent in the second decade after receiving a Ph.D., which the authors did not analyze.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/new-study-suggests-gender-gap-may-have-closed-in-tenure-track/441752/

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May 16, 2017

Warning: Federal Student Loan Rates Are About to Rise

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

By ANN CARRNS, NY Times

Borrowers can expect to pay more for federal student loans, beginning on July 1. The federal government sets interest rates on student loans annually, based on a formula adopted in 2013. The rate on new undergraduate Stafford loans, one of the most popular student loans, will rise to 4.45 percent, up from 3.76 percent this year. Rates for graduate student Stafford loans will increase to 6 percent, up from 5.31 percent.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/12/your-money/stafford-student-loan-rates.html

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Online Educator Udacity Adapts Courses to Changing Labor Market

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By Christopher Beach, Real Clear Education

In the fall of 2016, online educator Udacity announced the launch of a “nanodegree” program for self-driving car engineering. For $2,400, a student proficient in coding could enroll and learn the skills. The one-of-a-kind program and curriculum were designed in collaboration with Mercedes-Benz, Nvidia and Uber ATG. The first class has yet to conclude but already some impressive results are coming in. Chrysler has indicated that it wants to hire 40 graduates, according to Sebastian Thrun, founder and president of Udacity. “There are more than 1 million people dying every year in traffic accidents — largely due to human error and distracted or impaired driving. Employers are looking for thousands of engineers with the skills needed to solve this urgent, global problem. This is why making self-driving car engineering education accessible and efficient is so important.”

http://www.realcleareducation.com/articles/2017/05/02/online_educator_udacity_adapts_courses_to_changing_labor_market_110152.html

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The top 10 skills that will get you hired

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Marguerite Ward, CNBC

LinkedIn’s new list of top skills for 2017 confirms what experts have been saying for years. Tech skills are more important than ever, as digital advancements have radically transformed the working world. “While some skills expire every couple of years, our data strongly suggests that tech skills will still be needed for years to come in every industry,” LinkedIn career expert Catherine Fisher said in the report. The world’s largest professional social network analyzed hiring and recruiting activity on its platform between Jan. 1 and Sept. 1. Analysts then identified the skills that belonged to members who were more likely to start new jobs and receive interest from recruiters. Linked below are the 10 most in-demand skills.

http://www.cnbc.com/2016/10/20/the-top-10-skills-that-will-get-you-hired.html

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May 15, 2017

10 attributes of successful online students

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

BY MERIS STANSBURY, eCampus News

As online learning becomes increasingly popular, what are the skills and habits necessary for student success? Recently, eCampus News posted an article about the latest online learning myths, one of which was “earning an online degree is easy.” Typically, only those online students who are self-motivated tend to succeed, but are there other more define-able characteristics that characterize successful online students? In author Joel English’s book, Plugged In: Succeeding as an Online Learner, students about to embark in online learning are given a list of should-have skills or habits in order to succeed. English, as well as Cengage Learning (which produced an infographic based on the key points of English’s book) recommend instructors share these 10 boiled-down characteristics with their online students before starting the course or class.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/featured/featured-on-ecampus-news/attributes-online-students/

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Purdue’s Kaplan Purchase: Shoring Up the ’21st-Century Land-Grant Mission’

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

“To be a 21st-century land-grant school, to meet the obligation, really, the great opportunity, the noble opportunity that we have always embraced here at Purdue, we must be active in online education in a way we are not now,” said Purdue President Mitch Daniels in a prepared statement. Currently, Purdue encompasses a main campus in West Lafayette and two regional campuses, Purdue Fort Wayne and Purdue Northwest. The deal has drawn support from one unique quarter: Arne Duncan, who, as secretary for the U.S. Department of Education, drew the wrath of for-profit schools for his continual efforts to reign them in. “I’m excited by this opportunity for a world-class university to expand its reach and help educate adult learners by acquiring a strong for-profit college,” said Duncan in a prepared statement. “This is a first, and if successful, could help create a new model for what it means to be a land-grant institution.”

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/01/purdues-kaplan-purchase-shoring-up-the-21st-century-land-grant-mission.aspx

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A British Reboot Of Legal Education– Law School Optional

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

by Mark A. Cohen, Forbes

The Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA), the regulatory body that oversees the legal profession in England and Wales, has enacted a major overhaul of legal training and solicitor licensure to take effect in 2020. The exam will not spell the end of traditional legal education in the UK—no doubt many aspiring solicitors will opt for some form of traditional legal study. But the exam’s emphasis on competency based learning and its experiential requirements will undoubtedly serve to update outdated legal curricula, reduce law student debt, and better serve the public by ensuring new entrants to the profession have core competency and a modicum of practical experience. It shifts focus from course work at expensive universities to competency based experiential learning that can be obtained more efficiently, cost-effectively, and usefully by apprenticeships, jobs that require critical thinking, online learning, and other ‘real world’ means.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/markcohen1/2017/05/01/a-british-reboot-of-legal-education-law-school-optional/

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May 14, 2017

Small College Conversations and the Big Purdue / Kaplan Online Learning News

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:08 am

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

My guess is that reactions from folks who work at smaller schools will fall into 1 of 3 categories:

Category 1: Interesting – but probably not that big a deal for us. Category 2: Interesting – and important for us to understand and discuss. Category 3: Not only not interesting – but another example of the blurring line between the non-profit mission of higher education, and the growing corporate and market-based thinking that ruining this country. The reason that I think that all of us should pay attention is my belief that all of us should be paying attention to online learning. I believe that even small, residentially focused liberal arts institutions can leverage online learning to advance their core mission. This may be through providing opportunities for a more diverse population of students to access the strongest programs and faculty at your school.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/small-college-conversations-and-big-purdue-kaplan-online-learning-news

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