Education, Not Income, Predicted Who Would Vote For Trump

November 27th, 2016

By Nate Silver, 538

Sometimes statistical analysis is tricky, and sometimes a finding just jumps off the page. Here’s one example of the latter. I took a list of all 981 U.S. counties with 50,000 or more people and sorted it by the share of the population that had completed at least a four-year college degree. Hillary Clinton improved on President Obama’s 2012 performance in 48 of the country’s 50 most-well-educated counties. And on average, she improved on Obama’s margin of victory in these countries by almost 9 percentage points, even though Obama had done pretty well in them to begin with.

http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/education-not-income-predicted-who-would-vote-for-trump/

Share on Facebook

University Of Arizona To Offer Science Lab Classes Online

November 27th, 2016

By Kerry Fehr-Snyder, KJZZ

Students will be able to take science lab classes virtually. University of Arizona is giving students the chance to take science lab classes without ever setting foot in a lab. Classes being offered at UA Online Science Academy will include biology, chemistry, physiology, space, atmospheric and environmental sciences. The academy has been in the works for the past two and a half years, said Vincent Del Casino, UA’s vice provost for digital learning and student engagement. Advances in virtual reality, simulations and kits make science lab work possible, Del Casino said.

http://science.kjzz.org/content/397333/university-arizona-offer-science-lab-classes-online

Share on Facebook

Build a Campus Network as an Online Student

November 27th, 2016

by Joe Chapman, US News

For some, thriving in an online learning community may include joining a club; for others, it may be joining a social media group or meeting up in person for a class or with other students nearby. For many, this can be new territory. Here are a few ways to create community that prospective students should look for and current students should take advantage of.

http://www.usnews.com/education/online-learning-lessons/articles/2016-11-18/build-a-campus-network-as-an-online-student

Share on Facebook

More Private Colleges Welcome Online Education

November 26th, 2016

By Audri Taylors, UniversityHerald

A survey conducted by the CIC and the Learning House revealed that more colleges have grown to accept online education in their institutions. According to a survey of chief academic officers conducted by the Council of Independent Colleges and the Learning House, more and more private colleges are now open and accepting of online education. The number of private colleges that offer online education has now increased from 15 percent to 25 percent, and this climb was based on a survey conducted 2013. While there are still colleges who remain doubtful about online education, many colleges have already adapted to this. Learn what the private institutions will have to say about the implication of online education in their schools. Here are the findings revealed by the survey.

http://www.universityherald.com/articles/49671/20161116/more-private-colleges-welcome-online-education.htm

Share on Facebook

Education Insider: Ohio State faculty urged to put mental-health help info on course syllabus

November 26th, 2016

by Bill Bush and Mary Mogan Edwards, Education Insider

Ohio State University professors who want to make sure that students know how to get help for mental-health problems now have an easy way to do that. On Thursday, the University Senate approved a resolution encouraging all instructors to include a statement about mental-health services on their course syllabus. It’s up to each instructor or the department or college whether to incorporate the statement, which would describe the risks of poor mental health and give addresses and phone numbers for help. The university doesn’t require any specific content on a syllabus, said Wayne Carlson, dean of undergraduate education.

http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2016/11/16/education-insider-ohio-state-senate-backs-putting-mental-health-advisory-on-syllabus.html

Share on Facebook

Online learning is a smart option for HR professionals

November 26th, 2016

By AVADO, Personnel Today

Training your HR and L&D team doesn’t just improve their knowledge and skills; it also makes them feel more motivated and valued in their role. But many organisations are currently facing the challenge of training budget cuts and difficulty in releasing busy staff for face-to-face courses. Online training offers the perfect solution to this problem, providing a more time-efficient and cost-effective way to get employees to reach their full potential. However, not all online courses meet employer expectations; some simply offer dense passages of text on a page and leave students without structure or support. Completion rates are often low as learners struggle to stay motivated.

http://www.personneltoday.com/hr/online-learning-smart-option-hr-professionals/

Share on Facebook

How to Create and Sell Courses Online

November 25th, 2016

By Kirsten Drickey, Inside Higher Ed

Problem: you are a highly trained, skilled professional, but the academic job market is less than rosy. Solution: the market for online, nonacademic courses is large and growing. According to some estimates, by 2020 the worldwide market for self-paced online learning will be between $27.1 billion and $47.9 billion. Simply put, keeping their skills current has become another part of the job for most working professionals. More and more people are turning to platforms such as Lynda.com, Skillshare, Udemy and others. Unlike degree or certificate programs, most of these courses don’t lead to formal certification. Instead, participants aim to close an immediate gap in their skill sets or to further a personal interest.

https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2016/11/15/advice-academics-creating-and-selling-online-courses-essay

Share on Facebook

Free and inexpensive OER expand access, reduce stress for college students

November 25th, 2016

by Matt Zalaznick, University Business

The University of Maryland’s open source textbook initiative, known as “MOST,” has guided faculty through more than 50 OER adoptions. The program helps instructors assemble resources to significantly keep down the cost of course materials. Open educational resources have grown over the last few years from one-off oddities in single courses to the basis of entire degree programs. Cutting out textbook costs for students tops the list of reasons administrators encourage faculty to develop and adopt these free—or very inexpensive—resources, also known as OER. Other enticements include immediate access for students who sometimes wait or refuse to buy course materials, and instructors’ ability to customize and update OER, which range from digital textbooks to interactive tutorials to quizzes to YouTube videos.

https://www.universitybusiness.com/article/oer-revolution-higher-ed

Share on Facebook

EdTech From Artificial Intelligence To Big Data, Is Shaping The Future Of Online Learning

November 25th, 2016

by Seb Murray, Business Because

Edtech, from artificial intelligence to cloud computing and augmented reality, is sweeping through the higher education sector. And as online learning providers continue to challenge the oldest and best-known institutions, the world’s top business schools are racing to adopt cutting-edge learning technologies. “Innovations by vendors have led to the use of more advanced technologies such as simulations, cloud-based solutions, and AR,” says Jhansi Mary, lead analyst at Technavio, the consultancy.

http://www.businessbecause.com/news/mba-distance-learning/4297/edtech-trends-disrupt-business-education

Share on Facebook

What Does Betsy DeVos Have in Mind for Higher Ed?

November 24th, 2016

By Dan Berrett, Sarah Brown, Eric Kelderman, Brock Read, and Fernanda Zamudio-Suaréz; Chronicle of Higher Ed

By selecting Betsy DeVos to become the next secretary of education, President-elect Donald J. Trump has signaled his commitment to an ambitious plan to reform elementary and secondary education. Ms. DeVos, 58, is a leading player in the national school-choice movement. As chairwoman of the American Federation for Children, she has advocated aggressively for the expansion of charter schools and voucher programs for low-income students. Ms. DeVos’s lack of a track record in higher education is by no means unusual. Ms. DeVos’s nomination also met with some sharp criticism from both the left, where some see her as an opponent of public schools, and the right, where her stance on Common Core standards has come under scrutiny. Donald E. Heller, provost and vice president for academic affairs at the University of San Francisco, wrote on Twitter that Mr. Trump’s pick “could have been worse. But not much.”

http://www.chronicle.com/article/What-Does-Betsy-DeVos-Have-in/238514

Share on Facebook

Trump Picks Betsy DeVos as Education Secretary

November 24th, 2016

By Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed

President-elect Donald J. Trump has selected Betsy DeVos, a conservative philanthropist and Republican Party official known for her advocacy for private school vouchers, as education secretary, the transition office announced Wednesday. Little is known about her views on federal higher education policy. DeVos was chairwoman of the Michigan Republican Party in the late 1990s. She and her husband, Dick, who ran for governor of Michigan in 2006 and is a member of the family that owns Amway, have a foundation in their names that contributes heavily to education organizations and arts groups, especially in Michigan.

https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2016/11/23/trump-picks-betsy-devos-education-secretary

Share on Facebook

Oxford University to launch their first online ‘Mooc’ course

November 24th, 2016

By Sean Coughlan, BBC

Oxford University has announced its first “massive open online course” – or so-called Mooc – in a partnership with a US online university network. These free online courses have grown in popularity with hundreds of universities and millions of students. But until now Oxford has not offered such Mooc courses. It is going to run an economics course partnered with online platform edX, set up by Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The emergence of Mooc courses in recent years has been a major phenomenon in higher education, particularly in the United States. Their supporters argued that putting courses online would make them more accessible and affordable – while sceptics doubted that teaching and the exchange of ideas in seminars could be replicated on the internet.

http://www.bbc.com/news/education-37975359

Share on Facebook

Law Schools Experiment With Partially Online Learning

November 24th, 2016

By Jordan Friedman, US News

While the field of law has been slower than most to embrace online learning, some J.D. program professors are straying from the traditional teaching model and incorporating blended courses – those partially online, partially on campus – into their curriculums, experts say. There are currently no fully online J.D. programs accredited by the American Bar Association – though recognized online Master of Laws Degrees, or LL.M.s, and other legal master’s degrees and certificates do exist. A few law schools are, however, designating entire J.D. programs as blended to emphasize their convenience for busy adults. “I think the legal profession and legal education are just very resistant to change,” says Gregory Duhl, associate dean for strategic initiatives at the Mitchell Hamline School of Law, a recent merger between Hamline University and the William Mitchell College of Law. But since the Great Recession, when legal jobs were scarce, law schools have faced pressures to innovate, he says.

http://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/top-law-schools/articles/2016-11-07/law-schools-experiment-with-partially-online-learning

Share on Facebook

Here’s How Online Learning Will Disrupt The MBA Degree

November 24th, 2016

by Seb Murray, Business Because

Students are increasingly questioning the value of a traditional business school degree. Meanwhile, online learning is booming as costs come down and the technology improves. But will advances in online learning disrupt the MBA? By some metrics, the MBA is already falling out of fashion. The Graduate Management Admissions Council says applications to MBA programs fell in 53% of US business schools this year. Conversely, the number of distance learning students is up by 3.9% year-over-year, says the Online Learning Consortium. Nearly six million students are going viral. Rather than making a significant investment of time and money in advanced degrees, students are increasingly using stackable courses like Moocs and certificates to create their own customized educational packages. These aren’t degrees but instead are hybrid credentials that focus on specific niches such as project management or data science. Biz students are using stackable certificates to create customized online degrees.

https://www.businessbecause.com/news/mba-distance-learning/4301/online-learning-will-disrupt-the-mba

Share on Facebook

New website seeks to register professors accused of liberal bias and “anti-American values.”

November 23rd, 2016

By Colleen Flaherty, Inside Higher Ed

A new website is asking students and others to “expose and document” professors who “discriminate against conservative students, promote anti-American values and advance leftist propaganda in the classroom.” The site, called Professor Watchlist, is not without precedent — predecessors include the now-defunct NoIndoctrination.org, which logged accounts of alleged bias in the classroom. The group’s founder, Charlie Kirk — a millennial who has emerged in some conservative political circles as a major player — in a write-up of the project, said, “It’s no secret that some of America’s college professors are totally out of line” and that he often hears stories about “professors who attack and target conservatives, promote liberal propaganda and use their position of power to advance liberal agendas in their classroom. Turning Point USA is saying enough is enough. It’s time we expose these professors.”

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/11/22/new-website-seeks-register-professors-accused-liberal-bias-and-anti-american-values

Share on Facebook

‘The Content Trap’ and the HBX Story: Can high quality online education scale?

November 23rd, 2016

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

I would be recommending The Content Trap even if the final section of the book had not been devoted to the HBX – the Harvard Business School’s (HBS) online education initiative. Anand was one of the founding faculty members behind HBX, and is able to provide the first insider account (that I know of) of the thinking behind the launch of HBX. The central ideas behind The Content Trap will be familiar to any student of learning. The goal of every instructional designer (and Teaching and Learning Center) is to move teaching from a content-centered to a learner-centered activity. Anyone who has been paying attention to the research on learning will understand the futility of content transmission approach to teaching.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/content-trap-and-hbx-story

Share on Facebook

Are online classes the real deal?

November 23rd, 2016

By Nicole Mendez, Campus News

All in all, online classes are like any other class; they are what you make them. To be successful, the student must take it seriously, be organized, be committed to deadlines, be willing to learn, and most importantly be very near to a giant can of Red Bull; because chances are on top of the overwhelming work these classes bring, the average community college student will also be juggling a job, family, friends, and real time classrooms. When starting, take one online class to become acquainted with how they work, don’t forget your trusty planner, and most importantly hang in there, because in the end, class in your pajamas isn’t so bad.

http://cccnews.info/2014/01/05/are-online-classes-the-real-deal/

Share on Facebook

Trump Appoints Two Anti-Net Neutrality Advocates To Oversee FCC Transition

November 22nd, 2016
by Shelby Carpenter, Forbes
In case you’ve been wondering what will happen to net neutrality under the Trump presidency, wonder no more. On Monday, President-elect Donald Trump appointed Jeffrey Eisenach and Mark Jamison, two vocal opponents of net neutrality, to run his Federal Communications Commission (FCC) transition team. Both Eisenach and Jamison will come on as industry insiders: Eisenach is a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and has been a paid consultant for Verizon Wireless. He also worked the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) transition team under President Reagan and the FCC transition team under George W. Bush. Jamison, meanwhile, runs the Public Utility Resource Center at the University of Florida and is a former lobbyist for Sprint.
http://www.forbes.com/sites/shelbycarpenter/2016/11/21/trump-appoints-anti-net-neutrality-fcc-transition/#693ea75f33e1
Share on Facebook

Foxx on Higher Ed

November 22nd, 2016

By Andrew Kreighbaum, Inside Higher Ed

The likely next chair of the U.S. House education committee weighs in on GOP higher education priorities a week after Republicans captured the White House and retained both chambers of Congress. Representative Virginia Foxx is poised to assume leadership of the full committee in the next Congress. And the longtime critic of the Obama administration’s higher education policies says she and other Republicans are ready to reverse course on many of those policies. “I think we will early on in the committee have to spend some time on work force issues because of all of those onerous rules and regulations that were put in. There also some on the education side — the gainful employment rule, the state authorization rules, the credit-hour rule. So, there’s a lot of rules on both sides of the committee’s structure that I think we will need to deal with. Obviously, the big elephant in the room is the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act.”

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/11/17/virginia-foxx-weighs-gops-higher-education-priorities

Share on Facebook

Number of Colleges Declines, While Credentials Awarded Rises

November 22nd, 2016

By Doug Lederman, Inside Higher Ed

The number of postsecondary institutions in the United States declined by 1.8 percent from 2014-15 to 2015-16, with all of the decline occurring in the for-profit sector of higher education, new federal data show. The data, contained in an annual report from the U.S. Education Department’s National Center for Education Statistics, show that the number of U.S. institutions that award federal financial aid declined from 7,151 to 7,021. The number of public institutions actually increased by one from 2014-15 to 2015-16, while the number of private nonprofit colleges grew from 1,827 to 1,859. The number of for-profit institutions fell from 3,360 to 3,197. The same report shows that the number of degrees and other credentials conferred by American postsecondary institutions grew by 1.2 percent from 2013-14 to 2014-15, from 4.525 million to 4.581 million.

https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2016/11/16/number-colleges-declines-while-credentials-awarded-rises

Share on Facebook

Wall Street coders wanted, elite college degrees not necessary

November 22nd, 2016

by Hugh Son, Bloomberg

Financial institutions traditionally coveted graduates from Stanford and other big-name schools and people already working in Silicon Valley. But that system tends to overlook good programmers from other schools or gifted dropouts, according to recruiters. And besides, banks need to fill so many programming jobs that elite schools can’t possibly pump out enough candidates. So the industry is looking in places it never did, turning to outside firms to evaluate prospective programmers based on objective measurements, not their pedigree. The idea is that people lacking a computer science degree — art majors, graphic designers and chemistry graduates from the University of Delaware like Furlong — can still make the leap to well-paid careers in technology. By using algorithms to spot talented coders, HackerRank and competitors with names like Codility claim they’ve essentially increased the world’s supply of developers.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sns-wp-blm-banks-coders-55d26040-9cf3-11e6-b552-b1f85e484086-20161029-story.html

Share on Facebook