New report bodes well for e-learning

February 26th, 2017

by Brett Henebery, Learning and Development Professional

Melbourne-based course comparison start-up, ​training.com.au,​ recently surveyed over 3,000 people to gain a better understanding of what motivated them to consider further study and the role of technology in the delivery of courses. “Since there are so many online courses now on offer, and readily accessible, people are giving them a try and some discover it’s not for them.” There are other factors at play too, Thomas added. “Some of these include a sense, or lack thereof, of belonging to a learning community, time management skills and interaction with the teacher or instructor,” he explained. “Overall, it seems when it comes to higher education, people’s preference is for ‘blended’ learning where they can experience face-to-face learning supplemented by online learning.”

http://www.ldphub.com/general-news/new-report-bodes-well-for-elearning-231505.aspx

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Check out Steppingstone Scholars’ new online course for low-income students applying to college

February 26th, 2017

by Generosity.org

The nonprofit, which provides academic enrichment programs for minority and low-income students, collaborated with Penn to launch the course on Coursera. Steppingstone Scholars, the nonprofit established in 1999 to provide academic enrichment programs for minority and low-income students, believes first-generation and low-income students have particular difficulties navigating both the college search and admission processes. That’s why Steppingstone, in partnership with the University of Pennsylvania’s Office of Admissions, recently launched an online course called “How to Apply to College.”

http://generocity.org/philly/2017/02/16/steppingstone-scholars-online-course-apply-to-college/

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Ask 4 Questions About Accessing Online Courses on Mobile

February 26th, 2017

By Jordan Friedman, US News

Want to take online courses on your smartphone or tablet? In many programs, you can. For online learners constantly on the go, being able to access courses on mobile devices is important. Many online degree programs offer students mobile apps with most of the same capabilities as the virtual classrooms on their desktops and laptops, experts say. And it’s a topic many of today’s applicants ask about, says Katie Barak, manager of student resources and disability services at the online Colorado State University—Global Campus.

http://www.usnews.com/higher-education/online-education/articles/2017-02-16/ask-4-questions-about-accessing-online-courses-on-mobile-devices

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Is higher ed ready for the big edtech explosion?

February 25th, 2017

BY MERIS STANSBURY, eCampus News

New infographic details the causes of, and advice for, the incredible growth of college and university edtech spending over the next three years. According to recent research, edtech spending is on the rise, with an estimated $252 billion to be spent by colleges and universities on campus edtech by 2020. IT leaders and campus admin are projected to invest in everything from online learning solutions to personal devices, as well as investments in up-and-coming technologies as listed in the recent Horizon Report. The research was conducted by conducted by Marketwatch, the U.S. Department of Education, EDUCAUSE, Computer Economics, TDX Market Study, and HDI, and condensed into an informative infographic by TeamDynamix.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/featured/featured-on-ecampus-news/higher-edtech-explosion/

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Should Online Courses Go Through ‘Beta Testing’? How One Provider Taps 2,500 Volunteers

February 25th, 2017

By Jeffrey R. Young, EdSurge

Wesley Engers has an unusual hobby: beta testing online courses from well-known colleges and universities. He doesn’t get paid, but he helps improve the quality of courses by catching mistakes in quizzes and pointing out befuddling bits of video lectures, which can then be clarified before professors release the course to students. “I find it much more engaging than reading a book,” says Engers, a 29-year-old data scientist, when asked why he does it. “And I do enjoy giving back and trying to contribute to a community and help future students.” He’s one of about 2,500 volunteer beta testers for Coursera, and part of an expanded quality-control effort the company started in the past year.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-02-17-should-online-courses-go-through-beta-testing-how-one-provider-taps-2-500-volunteers

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Synthesis and Reactions to the 2017 NMC Horizon Report

February 25th, 2017

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

Trying to convince non-edtech academics to read and engage with this report. You don’t have time to read a 56 page report. Almost nothing that I could say could convince you to download, print, and devote a solid hour to the 2017 NMC Horizon Report. But maybe I can convince you to read the Executive Summary (2 pages, including graphics). This will take 5 minutes tops. Maybe less. I don’t need to persuade my edtech tribe about the merits of the Horizon Report. We love this stuff. A 56 page mirror on our thinking is too short. The Horizon Report is assembled from feedback from “78 education and technology experts” using a “modified Delphi process”. My goal is to that all of you edtech skeptics should put eyes to the NMC Report. You just might be surprised. [the report can be downloaded here: http://www.nmc.org/publication/nmc-horizon-report-2017-higher-education-edition/]

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/synthesis-and-reactions-2017-nmc-horizon-report

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Report: Millions of students reveal surprising online learning trends

February 24th, 2017

BY MERIS STANSBURY, Campus Technology

New study reveals that collaboration is still not a prevalent online learning habit; mobile phones have yet to be used for serious learning. GoConqr surveyed over 2.5 million students and teachers currently using the platform from over 160 countries last year (2016) to better understand their online learning habits and how learning is changing in general. The study surveyed students and teachers ranging from secondary to postgraduate levels. Some of the key findings of the report reveal that students and teachers are using online platforms as an additional source to help with selected subjects. Also, despite the prevalence of social networking, online study tends to be a solitary activity, with 79 percent of those surveyed choosing not to study collaboratively when they are online. However, this percentage is decreasing over time as traditional learning methods are being replaced with online and blended teaching styles.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/online-learning/students-online-learning-trends/

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How data analytics can bring out the best in a university

February 24th, 2017

by Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

New systems of data analytics can equip college campuses to set and reach goals for student achievement, operational efficiency, and financial stability, Ed Tech: Focus on Higher Ed reported — but the first step in harnessing these benefits is understanding concepts of implementation and execution. A risk that campuses face is the integration of analytics in partial rollouts, which can create ‘haves and have-nots’ among students and faculty, and gleaning best practices from peer institutions and vendors is a good way of preventing this kind of digital divide. Institutional culture and campus governance are also critical areas to consider before a major tech rollout, as faculty, staff and students will have to buy into the new systems and their potential benefits.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/university-data-analytics-security-operations/436355/

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Elite colleges bet big on micro-degree programs

February 24th, 2017

by Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

Several colleges and universities are now offering micro degree programs in the hopes of attracting professionals interested in career development while selling full graduate degree programs in the process, NPR reported yesterday. MIT, Columbia University and the University of Michigan are just a few of the high research institutions attracting students through these online programs, which offer advanced credentialing in engineering, business and computer science for a fraction of tuition costs that can exceed $60,000 a year for full degrees. The programs, which have the same rigorous admission standards as traditional offerings, can present a challenge to some students who enroll without prior experience in the disciplines.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/university-micro-degree-program-MIT-columbia-michigan/436372/

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These Top Schools Are Offering Big Savings On Master’s Degrees, But There’s A Catch

February 23rd, 2017

by KIRK CARAPEZZA, NPR

There’s an experiment underway at a few top universities around the world to make some master’s degrees out there more affordable. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for example, says the class of 2018 can get a master’s degree in supply chain management with tens of thousands in savings. The university’s normal price runs upwards of $67,000 for the current academic year. But it’s not as simple as sending in a coupon with your tuition bill. There are big hurdles for students, and clear benefits for the universities.

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2017/02/15/504478472/how-to-get-20-000-off-the-price-of-a-masters-degree

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UW class on how to spot fake data goes viral within hours

February 23rd, 2017

by Katherine Long, Seattle Times

Two University of Washington professors are taking aim at BS in a provocatively named new course they hope to teach this spring. The professors would like to push the course materials online — teaching it as a MOOC, for example, a freely available course taught over the web. When it came to picking a title for the course they will teach this spring, University of Washington professors Carl Bergstrom and Jevin West decided to abandon academic stodginess and get edgy. Their new course title? “Calling Bullshit in the Age of Big Data.” Bergstrom and West figured using a minor profanity was a surefire way to draw attention to the course. And sure enough — within hours of unveiling a wickedly funny webpage they created for the proposed class, and announcing it via Twitter, the BS course went viral. The webpage went live at midnight, and “we woke up the next morning and it was over the whole planet,” West said.

http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/education/uw-class-on-how-to-spot-fake-data-goes-viral-within-hours/

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RECORD GROWTH FOR UK ONLINE LEARNING COMPANY

February 23rd, 2017

by ICS

A leading UK online learning company ICS Learn experienced record levels of growth last year – with revenue rising 48%. The company, which caters for over 11,000 students, saw its students invest £11.3m in courses ranging from A-levels to industry qualifications – a £3.59million hike on the previous year. Across its faculties, HR saw the biggest upturn with spend on courses increasing 60 per cent between 2015 and 2016, while Accounting rose by 55 per cent, and Marketing jumped 45 per cent.

http://www.beattiegroup.com/workplus/press-releases/record-growth-for-uk-online-learning-company/

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Ransomware: Should you pay up?

February 22nd, 2017

By Stephanie Condon, ZD Net

The use of ransomware has spiked in recent years: Roughly A high percentage of spam emails in 2016 contained ransomware, according to a recent IBM Security study. Part of the reason is simply that it works: Nearly 70 percent of business victims surveyed by IBM said they paid hackers to recover data. The incentives of hackers are straightforward — they’re looking for a big payday — but it’s less clear whether their victims should cooperate. “It’s very simple in my mind,” said Michael Duff, the CISO for Stanford University, on a ransomware panel at the RSA Conference in San Francisco on Monday. “If you’re not able to reconstitute a system in the timeframe you need, and you need it up and running, pay the ransom.” Neil Jenkins, of the Homeland Security Department’s Enterprise Performance Management Office (EPMO), said that, “From the US government perspective, we definitely discourage the payment of ransom.”"From a national perspective… paying ransom encourages the business model,” he said. “The reason this has become such a popular thing to do is they’re actually making money off of this.”

http://www.zdnet.com/article/ransomware-should-you-pay-up/

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What educators can learn about effective teaching from a Harvard prof

February 22nd, 2017

BY ALAN NOVEMBER, Campus Technology

Harvard professor David Malan has managed to pull off a neat trick: His Computer Science 50 course is the most popular course at both Harvard and Yale. By examining his success, we can learn some important lessons about effective teaching. CS50 assumes no prior knowledge or skill in computer programming, yet it’s extremely demanding. Despite its rigor, CS50 regularly attracts thousands of students each year. While some aspire to become software engineers, others enroll just to experience the course. Why is Professor Malan’s course so popular, even with students who don’t plan a career in computer science—and even though it requires a lot of work? Here are three keys to Malan’s effective teaching that I think all schools everywhere should apply, from K-12 schools to colleges and universities.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/curriculum/effective-teaching-harvard-prof/

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Harvard Tailoring the MOOC Experience With Adaptive Learning

February 22nd, 2017

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

Harvard University has begun experimenting with the use of adaptive functionality in one of its massive open online courses (MOOCs). The initial finding is that students using the adaptive assessments learned more than those who didn’t — and spent less time overall getting through problems. Adaptive technology uses information gained as the learner interacts with the system to change up how a concept is presented by level of difficulty, order and types of help provided. The experiment took place in a single HarvardX course, “Super-Earths and Life” (now available as an on-demand course), deployed in the current academic year.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/02/02/harvard-tailoring-the-mooc-experience-with-adaptive-learning.aspx

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7 Tips for Listing MOOCs on Your Résumé

February 21st, 2017

By David Weldon, Campus Technology

Georgia Tech first began offering MOOCs in 2011 and has since increased its investment in the program. Last year the school put its most difficult degree program — the master’s degree in information technology — online, at a cost to the student of $6,700. In order to be accepted into the MOOC program, a student had to meet the full criteria of being a Georgia Tech student. And the institution worked hard to make sure that online students would receive an education that is on par with their campus counterparts. So, once students have gone through such a high-quality program, how do they use their MOOC experience to best advantage? Sham Mustafa, CEO and founder of Correlation One, has some thoughts. His company provides matchmaking services, focused on connecting employers with highly skilled data scientists. Those data scientists are heavily represented in the first waves of MOOC students.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/02/09/7-tips-for-listing-moocs-on-your-resume.aspx

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Online Learning Technologies to Boost the Global Medical Education Market Through 2021

February 21st, 2017

by Technavio, Business Wire

Global medical education market to grow at a CAGR of close to 17% during the period 2017-2021. Medical professionals are increasingly imparting education through online methodologies, largely replacing traditional physical classrooms. Universities and healthcare organizations are providing online medical education courses. Online methods such as flipped classrooms and blended learning offer myriad benefits to both students and teachers. These benefits vary from access features to course materials, online assessment facilities. It also has varied synchronous as well as asynchronous communication means such as webcasts and video conferencing. “Online learning technologies are becoming largely popular in emerging nations such as Kenya and China wherein most students do not have access to qualified teachers,” says Jhansi.

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170207005730/en/Online-Learning-Technologies-Boost-Global-Medical-Education

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Students Across the Globe Learn About Augmented Reality — From Each Other

February 21st, 2017

By Mary Grush, Campus Technology

Technology surrounds us, and so do questions about the readiness of our students to step into future job markets that have ever-increasing demands for technical competencies — and application proficiencies — in emerging technologies like augmented reality. One faculty member at Bentley University in Waltham, MA, considered ways that his students might best learn to create and use augmented reality. He designed a bold experiment with a partner school, Politehnica University of Timisoara, in Romania — the students would create AR artifacts to examine and learn from each other. In this learning collaboration, students from these two schools, on separate continents, learn about augmented reality and how it is used in industry. Here, Mark Frydenberg, a senior lecturer of computer and information systems and director of the CIS Sandbox at Bentley University in Waltham, MA, details the project and the thinking behind it.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/02/13/students-across-the-globe-learn-from-each-other-about-augmented-reality.aspx

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National Adult Learner Coalition Created to Advance Student Success

February 20th, 2017

by Bezinga

Four major associations join together as a cohesive voice advocating for adult students and the institutions that serve them. With support from Lumina Foundation, the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL), the Online Learning Consortium (OLC), Presidents’ Forum, and University Professional and Continuing Education Association (UPCEA) are pleased to announce the National Adult Learner Coalition. “For more than a century, UPCEA has advocated for adult learners,” said Robert Hansen, CEO, UPCEA. “Once a small minority, adult and non-traditional learners now constitute up to 85 percent of today’s students.” “Our coalition is dedicated to help realign federal policy with this new higher education landscape, advocating for the expansion of access, innovation, and creative solutions.”

https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/17/02/p9009921/national-adult-learner-coalition-created-to-advance-student-success

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Are Free Online Courses Worth the Time and Effort?

February 20th, 2017

by John Boitnott, Entrepreneur

To assess the efficacy of their programs, Coursera surveyed 52,000 of their users and asked them how taking an online course benefited them. The majority (over 60 percent) said the move helped them develop skills in their new position. Forty percent reported that they believed it improved their candidacy for a new job. Only 25 percent, however, said that they found a new job, and less than 5 percent received a raise. The final takeaway is this: free online courses can improve your current skill set and make you a better employee. It also shows initiative, which managers like. But it won’t necessarily land you a dream job.

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/288781

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Credit Computer Science Course Available Online to High School Students Across ID

February 20th, 2017

by Daily Fly

Thanks to a collaboration between Sandpoint High School, the University of Idaho College of Engineering, and UI Coeur d’Alene there will be a new dual-credit computer science course made available online to high school students across Idaho this fall. The course, “CS 112: Computational Thinking and Problem Solving,” is based on a face-to-face class co-designed by Sandpoint High School math teacher Nanette Brothers and UI associate professor Robert Heckendorn. Any high school student who completes Algebra 2 with at least a C average will be eligible to enroll.

http://lcvalley.dailyfly.com/Home/ArtMID/1352/ArticleID/45861/Dual-Credit-Computer-Science-Course-Available-Online-to-High-School-Students-Across-ID

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