Online Learning Update

April 26, 2017

Researchers examine the effectiveness of a psychological strategy on online learners

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:08 am

by Milenko Martinovich, Phys.org

While online education has opened access to learners worldwide, new Stanford research suggests that a single approach to teaching everyone in an online class may not yield the best outcome, especially when it comes to course completion. The key, the Stanford researchers say, is to recognize cultural differences among class participants, especially the difference between cultures that celebrate the power of the individual versus those where the good of the group comes first. Instructors can then tailor teaching strategies to best meet the learners’ needs. In a new study published last week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, results support the need for tailored strategies – based on cultural backgrounds – that can be scaled and help millions of learners worldwide.

https://phys.org/news/2017-04-effectiveness-psychological-strategy-online-learners.html

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Online courses make up more than half of CPS’s revenue

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

By Liz Konneker, GW Hatchet

The College of Professional Studies is earning more than half of its revenue from online courses – making the college a leader in online learning at GW.Fifty-four percent of the college’s revenue comes from students enrolled in online programs or courses and 60 percent of its students took at least one online course this academic year, Ali Eskandarian, the dean of the college, said at the April Faculty Senate meeting. Faculty said the school has embraced online learning because many of their students are non-traditional, meaning they already have professional jobs or families that take up a significant amount of time. The school began offering online courses a decade ago, and since then online learning has become a dominant part of the school’s mission, Eskandarian said in an email.

https://www.gwhatchet.com/2017/04/17/online-courses-make-up-more-than-half-of-cpss-revenue/

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College has new twist to online learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by News Channel 13

“We are providing to the learner the ability to affordably, flexibly and in a personalized way get the education that they want,” explained Nurit Sonnenschein, the Center for Educational Measurement general manager at Excelsior College, It’s called a CourXam. Excelsior College teamed up with Cengage Learning to create college credit worthy exams that offer more flexibility than standard online courses. “We have these pacing guides right in the welcome section of every product that says, ‘Do you have six weeks to do this do you want to do this in 12 weeks,’” noted Sonnenschein. Split up into modules, complete with readings, activities and quizzes, the CourXam also breaks down how much time each lesson will take to complete, allowing you to choose what you learn and when you learn it.

http://wnyt.com/stem/excelsior-college-online-learning-courxam-program/4455050/

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April 25, 2017

Simulated classroom learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Robert Klimper, Coyote Chronicle

Online courses sometimes are exactly what a busy college student needs, allowing for a more flexible schedule. Though online courses offer a more flexible schedule, it is not unheard of for students to feel a somewhat of a disconnect to the instructor of the courses as they can just be a wall of text with no face to face interaction. “If it is done well, an online course can connect you in very interesting ways to you students,” said Dr. Mihaela Popescu, communication professor and faculty associate with Academic Technologies & Innovation (ATI). Dr. Popescu sees a purpose in online courses and tries to work around the issue of the disconnect that can come from online only courses. She tries to achieve this through allowing the students themselves to introduce each other through outlets like video or audio so that other students feel a sense of connection.

http://coyotechronicle.net/simulated-classroom-learning/

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eMarketer Unveils New Estimates for Mobile App Usage

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by eMarketer Daily

App time will make up nearly 20% of total media time this year. Americans are spending more time within mobile apps and less time within mobile browsers. However, the number of apps being used regularly is dropping, as users concentrate their activities in core apps. In 2017, the average US adult will spend 2 hours, 25 minutes per day using mobile apps, a jump of 10.3% over last year, and slightly higher than previously forecast. That means time spent with mobile apps will reach 19.9% of average daily total media time this year.

https://www.emarketer.com/Article/eMarketer-Unveils-New-Estimates-Mobile-App-Usage/1015611

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What MasterClass Online Courses Pay to Lure Hollywood Stars as Teachers

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by Nataley Jarvey, Hollywood Reporter

A hundred grand is entry-level pay for masters including Shonda Rhimes, Aaron Sorkin, Steve Martin and Kevin Spacey dabbling as online instructors: “I would love a class from Elon Musk,” says MasterClass CEO David Rogier. When San Francisco-based MasterClass got underway in 2014, it had a hard time finding big names to teach its $90 online education courses. But the days of co-founder/CEO David Rogier cold-calling author James Patterson to convince him to sign on as an instructor are over. A-listers such as Hans Zimmer, Aaron Sorkin and now Shonda Rhimes are signing lucrative deals to teach, as MasterClass plans to expand into new subjects. MasterClass aims to bring the quality of Netflix to the $100 billion e-learning industry.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/what-masterclass-online-courses-pay-lure-hollywood-stars-as-teachers-993159

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April 24, 2017

The Democratization of Machine Learning: What It Means for Tech Innovation

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:12 am

by Kartik Hosanagar and Apoorv Saxena, Wharton

Now we are on the cusp of a new grand leap thanks to the democratization of machine learning, a form of artificial intelligence that enables computers to learn without being explicitly programmed. As recently as 2015, only large companies like Google, Amazon and Apple had access to the massive data and computing resources needed to train and launch sophisticated AI algorithms. Small startups and individuals simply didn’t have access and were effectively blocked out of the market. That changes now. The democratization of ML gives individuals and startups a chance to get their ideas off the ground and prove their concepts before raising the funds needed to scale. There is an effort underway to standardize and improve access across all layers of the machine learning stack.

http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/democratization-ai-means-tech-innovation/

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China’s Artificial-Intelligence Boom

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

by SARAH ZHANG, the Atlantic

The country’s universities and tech giants are starting to surpass American ones when it comes to researching and implementing AI. China’s rapid rise up the ranks of AI research has people taking notice. In October, the Obama White House released a “strategic plan” for AI research, which noted that the U.S. no longer leads the world in journal articles on “deep learning,” a particularly hot subset of AI research right now. The country that had overtaken the U.S.? China, of course. It’s not just academic research. Chinese tech companies are betting on AI, too. Baidu (a Chinese search-engine company often likened to Google), Didi (often likened to Uber), and Tencent (maker of the mega-popular messaging app WeChat) have all set up their own AI research labs. With millions of customers, these companies have access to the huge amount of data that training AI to detect patterns requires.

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/02/china-artificial-intelligence/516615/

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6 improvement trends spreading like fire across all colleges and universities

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

BY MERIS STANSBURY, eCampus News

Academic program creation and evaluation is top-of-mind with institutions. This year colleges and universities are looking to diversify their program portfolios, either through offering online or blended learning offerings, through offering micro-credentials, or by placing their bets on emerging programs. What’s also noteworthy this year is that Hanover has gone a step further in identifying the overarching improvement trend of academic program creation and review by including a list of the top high-growth and emerging programs in higher ed at the moment. “Facing declining enrollments and reductions in funding across key academic offerings, higher education institutions are diversifying their program offerings, experimenting with new teaching methods, and emphasizing the value in higher education to key external stakeholders.”

http://www.ecampusnews.com/alternative-pathways/improvement-trends-universities/

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April 23, 2017

Training Program Automation & Online Courses Nine Step Cheat Sheet Launched

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Military Technologies

A new nine step cheat sheet has been launched by Training Automation Secrets. The cheat sheet is aimed at trainer, coaches and consultants who wish to learn how to automate their training programs. Training Automation Secrets are offering an exclusive, free cheat sheet filled with the nine most valuable secrets to training business automation. This cheat sheet is aimed at trainers, coaches and consultants. These nine proven steps to automating training businesses online saves business owners time and money. The traditional method of training is to find customers and then train them, before repeating the process. The business owner who provides the training is involved in this process and it is time consuming for them. The cheat sheet explains that traditional offline training is good but by going online and automating the training program, the business owner can expand their business and free up valuable time.

http://www.military-technologies.net/2017/04/08/training-program-automation-online-courses-nine-step-cheat-sheet-launched/

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U of Phoenix-HBCU Partnership Expands

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

By Carl Straumsheim, Inside Higher Ed

Another historically black institution — South Carolina State — teams up with the University of Phoenix to offer online courses to a greater number of students. S.C. State will waive a $35 readmission fee and offer students a 50 percent discount on tuition rates, dropping the cost of a three-credit-hour course to $651. Students can take up to 27 credits from Phoenix. After the university reviews the students’ accounts for academic or financial holds, the academic departments map the courses they need to finish the degree they were pursuing before stopping out to equivalent courses offered by Phoenix. The BARC program is the latest product of an “alliance” that Phoenix and the Thurgood Marshall College Fund entered into in November 2014 to boost online education at historically black colleges and universities.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/04/11/south-carolina-state-latest-hbcu-partner-phoenix-online-education

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eLearning turns a boon for students who skip classes

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by THE HANS INDIA

After a year-long practice and competitions in tournaments, Snehit an international table tennis player who barely attends schools, takes a break from his sports activity to appear for his 11th standard final exams. Snehit is always on the move, either for a practice session in Chennai or elsewhere in the world. Yet he manages to get an above average score in his exams. There are many students like Snehit, who could not make it to the classes for various reasons. Some have taken up part-time jobs, some help family businesses, some pursue arts of various forms and others just bunk classes. But when it comes to learning and writing exams, these students have apt tools which help them make up for the classes they missed. Surprisingly, such students fare better in exams than the ones who attend college regularly if not studiously.

http://www.thehansindia.com/posts/index/Andhra-Pradesh/2017-04-09/eLearning-turns-a-boon-for-students-who-skip-classes/292106

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April 22, 2017

Companies turn to online platforms to upskill staff

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Varuni Khosla, Prachi Verma, Brinda Dasgupta; Economic Times

Ericsson is among tens of companies pushing their employees to join massive open online courses (MOOCs) offered by the top universities to upskill themselves even as online education upends established teaching norms, getting rid of the classroom and giving learners the ability to study from just about anywhere. Not only has it allowed students the freedom to take any course that interests them from top universities — mostly free if they don’t want a certificate — but it has also provided employers the freedom to upskill their employees as and when the need arises. Consultants say most of the companies partner with online platforms such as Coursera, edX and Udacity to foster learning among their employees, and reduce costs and risks.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/jobs/companies-turn-to-online-platforms-to-upskill-staff/articleshow/58117708.cms

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Where Non-Techies Can Get with the Programming

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By STEVE LOHR, NY Times

When the Georgetown University Law Center offered computer programming last year, it was an experiment, a single class for about 20 students. It was filled almost instantly, and the waitlist swelled to 130. This semester, the law school has five programming classes, and the waitlist still overflowed. “They aren’t going to become programmers, but they realize these are skills that will make them better lawyers,” said Paul Ohm, the Georgetown law professor who teaches the course. His students, for example, learn to write short, tailored programs that can identify clusters of words and concepts in Supreme Court rulings more accurately than a Google search or standard legal software. It’s the same in every field, from marketing to manufacturing to medicine. Code, it seems, is the lingua franca of the modern economy.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/04/education/edlife/where-non-techies-computer-programming-coding.html

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Instructional Design and Technology Teams: Work Experiences and Professional Development

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am
by the UPCEA eDesign Collaborative
The University Professional and Continuing Education Association (UPCEA) conducted a research study in the spring of 2017 to learn more about the professional development needs and work experiences of instructional designers, instructional technologists, multimedia designers, and their team leaders.  The goal was to determine how similar the team leaders and team members felt about their careers, the future of instructional design, professional development and continuing education options, and how to best equip team members to further their careers.

http://upcea.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Instructional-Design-and-Technology-Teams-Work-Experiences-and-Professional-Development.pdf

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April 21, 2017

Saturday March for Science in Washington and around the World

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 10:57 am

By Andrew Kreighbaum, Inside Higher Ed

The national march in D.C. this Saturday, along with satellite events across the country (and around the world) likely won’t match the turnout of the Women’s March on Jan. 21 — a protest some observers speculated was among the largest in U.S. history. But the March for Science has received intense levels of interest since organizers in January began discussing the possibility and subsequently launched Facebook and Twitter accounts. Rush Holt, CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, said this week that the March for Science is a nonpartisan event that will focus on a positive message about what’s needed for science to thrive. “It’s time to get off the sidelines and make a difference.”

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/04/21/university-researchers-and-scientists-make-rare-political-engagement-over-fears

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Study: Adjuncts bring real-world experience, yet desire closer connection to the academic community

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By eCampus News

Cengage survey presents adjunct faculty feedback on collaboration, digital technology and professional development. A new study from Cengage finds that although adjunct faculty are very student-focused and believe they offer unique value, including real-world expertise and industry contacts, they feel disconnected and less valued than full-time faculty. And, while more than half of adjuncts are using digital learning tools, they want more opportunities for collaboration and professional development using these materials, the survey finds. Cengage and Zeldis Research Associates conducted both qualitative and quantitative research over a six-month period and connected with nearly 500 adjunct instructors.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/campus-administration/adjuncts-academic-community/

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6 ways to engage alumni using Facebook Live

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

BY MICHAEL ELLISON, eCampus News

Launched in April 2016, Facebook Live allows the most-used social network’s users to share up to eight hours of live video with their followers and friends. According to a Facebook spokesperson, the vast majority of these recordings come from people instead of public figures and publishers, and the number of people broadcasting live at any given minute has grown by four times since its launch. Further, users comment over 10 times more on Facebook Live videos than on regular videos, demonstrating that broadcasts engage users with their real-time reactions and comments. Many colleges and universities have already begun integrating Facebook Live into their social media marketing schemes. Out of the 45-school Alumni Monitor coverage group, 36 schools have hosted at least one Facebook Live event within their main university or alumni-focused social media page. For those schools looking to begin (or expand on) their current Facebook Live presence, here are six ideas for engaging alumni using Facebook Live.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/featured/featured-on-ecampus-news/engaging-alumni-facebook-live/

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California State University System Streamlines OER Adoption for Faculty and Students

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Sri Ravipati, Campus Technology

The California State University (CSU) system — in a move to deliver affordable course materials to more than 50,800 faculty and 497,000 students across its 23 campuses — has partnered with a company that provides access to millions of digital textbooks and digital-authoring tools for open educational resources (OER). CSU announced a new partnership with VitalSource yesterday at the Online Learning Consortium Innovate conference in New Orleans.

https://www.enterprisetech.com/2017/04/09/train-locomotives-without-wheels-moats-cyber-security-innovations/

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April 20, 2017

80% drop in per student support for higher ed in Illlinois skews national figures

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 11:03 am
by Rick Seltzer, Inside Higher Ed
Support for public higher education rose in 33 states and declined in 17 in 2016 — including a massive drop in Illinois. It’s impossible to examine state higher education finances in 2016 without separating the collapse in Illinois from a more nuanced picture across the rest of the country. State and local support for higher education in Illinois plunged as the state’s lawmakers and governor were unable to reach a budget agreement and instead passed severely pared-down stopgap funding. Educational appropriations per full-time equivalent student in the state skidded 80 percent year over year, from $10,986 to $2,196. Enrollment in public institutions dropped by 11 percent, or 46,000 students. “Our data is made up of so many different states,” said Sophia Laderman, SHEEO data analyst and the report’s primary author. “Without Illinois, we’re seeing an increase in appropriations per student, after adjusting for inflation. But it’s smaller than in the previous year.”
https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/04/20/state-support-higher-education-increased-2016-not-counting-illinois
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New Frontiers in Cyber Security: Locomotives without Wheels, Moats, Deep Learning at the Edge

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by Doug Black, Enterprise Tech

Industry analyst Bob Sorensen recently told us something most IT managers already know deep in their apprehensive hearts: cyber security is in a sorry state. Security at many companies is somewhat marginalized, an unfavored area that lies outside core IT operations and procedures, a focal point at many companies of ineffectuality and denial that can be characterized as: Don’t just do something, sit there! Yet everyone grasps the bottom line and reputation risks of poor security. This anxiousness, coupled with uncertainty about their own cyber security strategies, results in many companies – at least those that haven’t been attacked yet – taking refuge in the feeble rationalization: “We haven’t been breached yet so we must be doing something right.”

Yeah, sure.

https://www.enterprisetech.com/2017/04/09/train-locomotives-without-wheels-moats-cyber-security-innovations/

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