Online Learning Update

April 23, 2017

U of Phoenix-HBCU Partnership Expands

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

By Carl Straumsheim, Inside Higher Ed

Another historically black institution — South Carolina State — teams up with the University of Phoenix to offer online courses to a greater number of students. S.C. State will waive a $35 readmission fee and offer students a 50 percent discount on tuition rates, dropping the cost of a three-credit-hour course to $651. Students can take up to 27 credits from Phoenix. After the university reviews the students’ accounts for academic or financial holds, the academic departments map the courses they need to finish the degree they were pursuing before stopping out to equivalent courses offered by Phoenix. The BARC program is the latest product of an “alliance” that Phoenix and the Thurgood Marshall College Fund entered into in November 2014 to boost online education at historically black colleges and universities.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/04/11/south-carolina-state-latest-hbcu-partner-phoenix-online-education

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April 17, 2017

Thinking Small About Online Learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

Online programs can be a vehicle to highlight differentiation. What school, department, program, or area of research does your school do better than anybody else?What degree programs are you most proud? What areas of teaching and knowledge creation have you build a critical mass of faculty? Building online programs around your strengths is a way not to compete with the Liberty’s, WGU’s, and SNHU’s of the world. My advice is that you don’t want to compete with these schools anyway. They have figured out the efficiencies around scale. Competing against the recruitment and student services and course development and instructional engines that they have built is a losing proposition. So do something different. The economics of online education mean that it is possible to build a very small program that is financially sustainable. If the focus is institutional differentiation and program quality – economic sustainability should be enough.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/thinking-small-about-online-learning

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April 8, 2017

UI to offer online master’s program in accounting

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by Julie Wurth, News-Gazette

A third online-only master’s program, this one from the top-ranked accounting department, will soon be available at the University of Illinois. Offered in partnership with the online learning platform Coursera, the program is geared toward professionals who want to beef up their accounting credentials, refresh their skills or change careers. The UI is the first top five accounting program to offer a master of science in accounting completely online, dubbed the “iMSA.” The UI helped pioneer this model with the Silicon Valley-based Coursera last year with an “iMBA,” an online master’s degree in business administration for $20,000, a fraction of the cost of the on-campus MBA program. It currently has 500 students from around the globe.

http://www.news-gazette.com/news/local/2017-03-29/ui-offer-online-masters-program-accounting.html

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April 1, 2017

4 Facts About Internships for Online Bachelor’s Students

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By Jordan Friedman, US News

Prospective online undergrads should consider whether a program allows students to intern near home, experts say. Though some online students live far away from their institution’s campus, they might be allowed to find opportunities in their own communities. “That becomes a real benefit to the experience because these students are building those networks in the community that they’re ultimately going to work in,” says Shannon Corkery, director of human development and family studies online programs at Pennsylvania State University—World Campus, which has a required internship component for bachelor’s students. It’s also not uncommon for online students to find internships with their current employer in a different department.

https://www.usnews.com/higher-education/online-education/articles/2017-03-23/4-facts-about-completing-internships-as-an-online-bachelors-student

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March 14, 2017

‘No Plans’ to Delete Free Content

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 11:17 am

By Carl Straumsheim, Inside Higher Ed

The recent decision by the University of California, Berkeley, to restrict public access to free online educational content has raised questions about whether other colleges and universities will do the same to avoid legal action. Disability rights groups have been open about continuing to take the legal route to ensure that institutions don’t discriminate against students with disabilities. Inside Higher Ed asked several universities that offer free online courses and other educational content if they are considering following in Berkeley’s footsteps. The institutions that did respond were unanimous in their responses: they will continue to offer publicly available content. It is unclear whether the Justice Department will take as active a role in accessibility lawsuits under President Trump.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/03/14/after-uc-berkeley-announcement-universities-say-they-will-continue-offer-free

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March 6, 2017

Berkeley Will Delete Online Content

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 10:08 am

by Carl Straumsheim, Inside Higher Ed

The University of California, Berkeley, will cut off public access to tens of thousands of video lectures and podcasts in response to a U.S. Justice Department order that it make the educational content accessible to people with disabilities. Today, the content is available to the public on YouTube, iTunes U and the university’s site. On March 15, the university will begin removing the more than 20,000 audio and video files from those platforms and require users sign in with University of California credentials to view or listen to them. Cathy Koshland, vice chancellor for undergraduate education, says “This move will also partially address recent findings by the Department of Justice, which suggests that the YouTube and iTunes U content meet higher accessibility standards as a condition of remaining publicly available.”

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/03/06/u-california-berkeley-delete-publicly-available-educational-content

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March 5, 2017

Berklee College of Music professor’s online courses provide access for all

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

by Sandra Larson, Bay State Banner

“Every time music gets played, someone gets paid,” John Kellogg is fond of saying. The musician, lawyer, book author and Berklee College of Music professor follows the statement with his signature advice for anyone involved in music performance and production: “You should get paid, not played.” Kellogg’s music business wisdom has accrued over a multi-faceted working life that spans songwriting and singing with the band Cameo in the 1970s, decades as an entertainment lawyer representing star R & B and rap acts, and educating students at University of Colorado and now at Berklee, where he also is assistant chair of the music business/management department. So far, nearly 70,000 people from around the world have accessed “Introduction to the Music Business,” a six-week course offered four times per year on the EdX platform, or the shorter “Music Business Foundations” offered every few weeks on Coursera.

http://baystatebanner.com/news/2017/feb/22/berklee-college-music-professors-online-courses-pr/

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February 25, 2017

Is higher ed ready for the big edtech explosion?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:11 am

BY MERIS STANSBURY, eCampus News

New infographic details the causes of, and advice for, the incredible growth of college and university edtech spending over the next three years. According to recent research, edtech spending is on the rise, with an estimated $252 billion to be spent by colleges and universities on campus edtech by 2020. IT leaders and campus admin are projected to invest in everything from online learning solutions to personal devices, as well as investments in up-and-coming technologies as listed in the recent Horizon Report. The research was conducted by conducted by Marketwatch, the U.S. Department of Education, EDUCAUSE, Computer Economics, TDX Market Study, and HDI, and condensed into an informative infographic by TeamDynamix.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/featured/featured-on-ecampus-news/higher-edtech-explosion/

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February 6, 2017

Brief interventions help online learners persist with coursework, Stanford research finds

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

BY ALEX SHASHKEVICH, Stanford University News

A study, published in the Jan. 20 issue of Science, found that people in less-developed countries are completing MOOCs at a lower rate than those in the more developed parts of the world. But, the researchers found, brief psychological interventions that affirm class takers’ sense that they belong can help close the global achievement gap. “MOOCs have expanded access to education but this doesn’t guarantee equal opportunities for people around the world,” said René Kizilcec, the lead author of the study and a doctoral candidate in the Department of Communication. “Providing access to the Internet and courseware is not enough. People need to feel welcome in online-learning environments to reach their potential.”

http://news.stanford.edu/2017/01/19/brief-interventions-help-online-learners-persist-coursework-stanford-research-finds/

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December 30, 2016

ED publishes final rules on distance education

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:09 am

by Jarrett Carter, Education dive

The U.S. Department of Education has finalized its guidance on colleges and universities offering online degrees in states and territories beyond their home location, requiring that schools receive authorization from every state where domestic students do, or could pursue degrees. The guidance allows for continuation of the State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement, which allows degree offerings in 44 states so far. According to Inside Higher Ed, some observers are not sure if the new guidance will be maintained under the incoming Trump Administration, which has shared on the record a desire to rollback several key elements of educational regulation.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/ed-publishes-final-rules-on-distance-education/432747/

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December 21, 2016

Is Distance Ed Rule DOA?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:12 am

By Carl Straumsheim, Inside Higher Ed

Education Department finally issues rule on state approval of online programs, but with opposition in Congress, it may never go into effect. The U.S. Department of Education, with a month to go until the transition of power, has finalized a rule that clarifies how colleges become authorized to offer online programs to students in other states — an effort in the works since the first years of the Obama administration. But the rule is by all indications dead on arrival. President-elect Trump has support for undoing Obama’s regulatory legacy in Congress. Representative Virginia Foxx, Republican of North Carolina, said in an interview with Inside Higher Ed last month that her party is looking to “deal with” certain “onerous rules and regulations” as part of how it approaches higher education. Foxx, the incoming chairwoman of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, specifically mentioned the state authorization rule as one example. She has over the last several years introduced bills that would block or repeal that and other rules issued by the Education Department.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/12/21/state-authorization-rule-long-works-faces-opposition-new-congress

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October 19, 2016

Texas A&M Prof Develops AI for Adaptive Online Learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Leila Meyer, Campus Technology

A professor at Texas A&M University is developing artificial intelligence (AI) technology for creating adaptive online courses. Noboru Matsuda, an associate professor of cyber STEM education in the Department of Teaching, Learning and Culture at Texas A&M is currently the principal investigator on three related research projects funded by National Science Foundation grants. In September 2016, Matsuda received his latest grant for a project that aims to develop a browser-based development environment to let teachers author their own adaptive online courses without specialized training. The technology will also enable researchers to gather data about how students learn from adaptive online courses.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/10/11/texas-am-prof-develops-ai-for-adaptive-online-learning.aspx

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October 18, 2016

The future’s looking good for online learning

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By CHASEN SHAO, the Pennsylvanian

Last week, Penn hosted the Third Annual Learning with MOOCs Conference, bringing together leaders in the mass learning system. MOOCs — Massive Online Open Courses — were created in 2008, and since then, various universities have started offering free courses. Through a grant from the United States Department of State, Penn has also begun offering MOOCs. Provost Vincent Price and CEO of edX, Anant Agarwal, were among the panelists who discussed the development of the MOOCs and their visions for the future at the conference on Oct. 6 and 7. Agarwal described MOOCs as a response to what he believes is a broken current educational system. He calls his solution the “unbundling” of the four-year educational system provided by universities and colleges.

http://www.thedp.com/article/2016/10/moocs-conference-online-learning

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October 13, 2016

DOJ vs. UC Berkeley: Forcing Online Content to Be Accessible

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by TANYA ROSCORLA, Center for Digital Education

On Aug. 30, Rebecca B. Bond, the chief of the disability rights section of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division, sent a 10-page letter to Chancellor Nicholas B. Dirks and campus counsel representatives that laid out the conclusion of a Title II Americans with Disability Act investigation. In October 2014 the U.S. Department of Justice on behalf of the National Association of the Deaf. This complaint said deaf or hard-of-hearing individuals could not access UC Berkeley’s audio and video content that is available to the public online at no cost. Title II of the act prohibits public entities including colleges and universities from excluding or denying the benefit of their programs, goods or services to people with disabilities. The U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Education Department both have authority to enforce this law through their civil rights’ divisions, and they have filed at least 15 lawsuits since 2003 against colleges that don’t comply.

http://www.centerdigitaled.com/higher-ed/Web-Accessibility-Investigation-Higher-Ed.html

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September 28, 2016

Because of the ADA, Universities May Withdraw Free Online Course Content

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By WALTER OLSON, CATO Institute

On September 13, the University of California at Berkeley announced that it may have to take down online lecture and course content that it has offered free to the public: content that we have made available to the public. That Berkeley is not just imagining these legal dangers is illustrated by this clip from Tamar Lewin of the New York Times from February of last year: “Harvard and M.I.T. Are Sued Over Lack of Closed Captions.” I’ve been warning about this, to no apparent avail, for a long time. I noted the tag-team alliance of the U.S. Department of Justice, disabled-rights groups, and fee-seeking private lawyers in gearing up web-accessibility doctrine.

http://www.cato.org/blog/because-ada-universities-may-withdraw-free-online-course-content

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September 16, 2016

Digital Tips for Cultural Responsive Activities

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by Nancy Wozniak, University of Alaksa Anchorage

Culturally-responsive design strategies allow students to realize they are important as participants in the class community and respected as unique individuals. The University of Alaska Anchorage includes culturally-mediated design as a major development strategy for their Robust Online Learning Program (Title III Grant) focused on General Education Requirement (GER) online courses. The goal is to create online environments that nuture and support cultural exchange and community. One thing to remember, when designing culturally responsive activities, is that students learn best, collaboratively. They learn effectively by discussing their ideas with one another and by participating in peer-to-peer learning activities and reviews. Here are 5 digital tips for infusing cultural responsiveness in your course.

https://www.uaa.alaska.edu/academics/institutional-effectiveness/departments/academic-innovations-elearning/robust-online-learning/spotlights/digital-tips.cshtml

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September 7, 2016

Notre Dame announces collaboration with AT&T for online master’s degree in data science

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Sue Lister, University of Notre Dame

In a data-driven economy, industry leaders rely increasingly on skilled professionals who can see the significance in data and use it to solve business challenges, create new opportunities and shape change. With a growing need for skilled data scientists, the University of Notre Dame, in collaboration with AT&T, has announced its new online master of science degree with a specialization in data science. Offered by the Department of Applied and Computational Mathematics and Statistics, with the collaboration of the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, the Mendoza College of Business and the Department of Psychology, this degree program will prepare graduates for careers as data scientists in a wide range of industry fields fields including management, marketing, information technology, government policy, health care, finance, education and scientific research.

http://news.nd.edu/news/69265-notre-dame-announces-collaboration-with-att-for-online-masters-degree-in-data-science/

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September 6, 2016

Penn is teaming up with the State Department to offer online courses to English language learners

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:09 am

By CHASEN SHAO, Daily Pennsylvanian

Penn is partnering with the State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs to offer a series of online courses geared towards English language learners. The courses are being offered through Online Learning at the School of Arts and Sciences as well as the College of Liberal and Professional Studies. The curriculum is designed for advanced beginner and intermediate learners, and in total, 33,000 students are enrolled across 161 countries. The collaboration focuses on five content areas: Business and Entrepreneurship, English for Journalism, Career Development, Media Literacy and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. Using the predetermined content areas, LPS created five courses through the online learning platform Coursera with the same names.

http://www.thedp.com/article/2016/08/penn-english-journalism-course

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August 24, 2016

Colleges partner with training boot camps and online course providers for federal experiment

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Danielle Douglas-Gabriel, Washington Post

Eight colleges will team up with companies that run computer coding boot camps or online courses for an experiment that lets students pay for nontraditional training programs with federal grants and loans, the Education Department said Tuesday. Short-term courses, such as coding boot camps, have become a popular model for acquiring skills and credentials without spending years in school, yet they’ve only been available to people who can afford thousands of dollars for six-week classes. The objective of the experiment, dubbed the Educational Quality through Innovative Partnerships, is to provide people with modest means access to innovative education and to ensure that they receive quality training.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/grade-point/wp/2016/08/16/colleges-partner-with-training-bootcamps-and-online-course-providers-for-federal-experiment/

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July 29, 2016

Education Department Proposes Rule on State Authorization of Postsecondary Distance Education, Foreign Locations

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:09 am

by US Dept of Ed

The U.S. Department of Education today proposes regulations that seek to improve oversight and protect more than 5.5 million distance education students at degree-granting institutions, including nearly 3 million exclusively online students by clarifying the state authorization requirements for postsecondary distance education. To ensure that institutions offering distance education are legally authorized and monitored by states, as required by the Higher Education Act, the proposed regulations clarify state authorization requirements for institutions to participate in the Department’s federal student aid programs. The proposed regulations also address state and federal oversight of American colleges operating in foreign locations worldwide.

http://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/education-department-proposes-rule-state-authorization-postsecondary-distance-education-foreign-locations

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July 27, 2016

UN launches e-learning training to tackle sexual exploitation and abuse

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:06 am

by UN News Centre

The United Nations department providing logistical support to field missions announced today the launch of a new mandatory online programme for all uniformed and civilian personnel to strengthen training on the standards of conduct, with a special focus on sexual exploitation and abuse. The programme is part of the UN’s wider effort to implement a series of corrective and preventive measures, following a number of allegations of such misconduct, including within the ranks of its peacekeepers. “The new e-learning programme is an important step in reinforcing our prevention efforts against misconduct by UN personnel,” said Under-Secretary-General for Field Support Atul Khare in a memo issued to journalists by the UN spokesperson’s office.

http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=54535#.V5T-yUsrLow

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