Online Learning Update

July 24, 2018

Mixing and Matching Cal State Online Courses — Free

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Mark Lieberman, Inside Higher Ed

Many institutions allow residential students to dabble in online courses as they work through their schedule of face-to-face classes. The California State University System takes that offering one step further, presenting full-time students at all of the system’s 23 institutions with the option to enroll for free in one online course per semester at another Cal State institution.  The system has allowed residential students to take one free online course per semester at other campuses since 2013 — and more than 2,400 students have taken advantage, according to Mike Uhlenkamp, interim senior director of public affairs. The provision was codified in California state law in 2015. But the pool of online courses was more limited, and the institution didn’t advertise this option as widely as it will now, Uhlenkamp said.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/07/13/cal-state-allows-students-take-online-courses-other-system

Share on Facebook

All learning ‘is going to happen digitally’, Coursera boss says

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:04 am

By Anna McKie, Times Higher Education
Eventually “all learning is going to happen digitally”, according to Jeff Maggioncalda, the chief executive of online learning platform Coursera. Increasing use of technology on campus will erode division between online and offline education, according to Jeff Maggioncalda But Mr Maggioncalda was not rehearsing the tired trope that massive open online courses offered by the likes of Coursera will drive traditional universities out of business. Instead, he was predicting that learning on university campuses will increasingly take place online over the next five to 10 years.

https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/all-learning-going-happen-digitally-coursera-boss-says

Share on Facebook

‘The Future of Tech Is Female’

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

By Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed

The share of women in many science and technology fields has increased dramatically in the last generation — in some cases reaching parity with men. But women’s gains have lagged in computer science, some technology fields and in the businesses where many of the graduates of those programs aspire to work. A new book says that both colleges and businesses can do better. Failing to improve, the book argues, means wasting talent that could promote innovation in both academe and industry. The book is The Future of Tech Is Female: How to Achieve Gender Diversity (New York University Press). The author is Douglas M. Branson, the W. Edward Sell Chair in Law at the University of Pittsburgh.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/07/17/author-discusses-his-new-book-about-women-tech-industry-and-engineering-education

Share on Facebook

July 23, 2018

Open educational resources have saved students millions of dollars, but can they also improve students’ grades?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed
A large-scale study at the University of Georgia has found that college students provided with free course materials at the beginning of a class get significantly better academic results than those that do not. The Georgia study, published this week, compared the final grades of students enrolled in eight large undergraduate courses between 2010 and 2016. Each of these courses was taught by a professor who switched from a commercial textbook costing $100 or more to a free digital textbook, or open educational resource, at some point during that six-year period.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/07/16/measuring-impact-oer-university-georgia

Share on Facebook

Cengage Contributes Openly Licensed Content to OER Community

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:08 am

The share of women in many science and technology fields has increased dramatically in the last generation — in some cases reaching parity with men. But women’s gains have lagged in computer science, some technology fields and in the businesses where many of the graduates of those programs aspire to work. A new book says that both colleges and businesses can do better. Failing to improve, the book argues, means wasting talent that could promote innovation in both academe and industry. The book is The Future of Tech Is Female: How to Achieve Gender Diversity (New York University Press). The author is Douglas M. Branson, the W. Edward Sell Chair in Law at the University of Pittsburgh.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/07/17/author-discusses-his-new-book-about-women-tech-industry-and-engineering-education

Share on Facebook

Experts say we’re approaching a third wave of higher-ed reform

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News
An evolving workforce will demand lifelong learning, and higher-ed reform will have to mold postsecondary education to follow suit.  As the global economy changes and demands more highly-skilled workers, some experts are tracking what they call a third wave of postsecondary education reform focused on making sure graduates have career-long alignment between their education and the job market. The new report from Jobs for the Future (JFF) and Pearson notes that a career path won’t have a single-job trajectory, but instead will require a lifetime of learning. Higher education will have to experience significant reform to create graduates equipped for such a workforce, the report’s authors claim. “As the future of work is realized, what makes us human is what will make us employable; education systems are already evolving to develop and measure the skills that matter, but there is much more that can be done,” says Maria Flynn, JFF’s president and chief executive officer.

Experts say we’re approaching a third wave of higher-ed reform

Share on Facebook

July 22, 2018

Enabling the future of online learning via human connection

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:12 am

by Education Technology (UK)

Online education has revolutionised the way students learn by giving learners autonomy over their learning. Nevertheless, the education community is becoming aware of its limitation: its dependency on students’ own motivation to continue studying. A new approach to online learning, therefore, has emerged in Japan to ensure the success of every student – online coaching.  There are three distinct roles coaches play. First, coaches generate an electronic learning record (ELR) for each student, based on the student’s dream, academic objectives, recent assessment results, extracurricular activities, time available to study and so on. The ELR includes a study plan, learner profile, and learning history. Besides assisting coaches to align learning objectives and expectations with learners, the ELR ensures continuous support of each student even if coaches change.

https://edtechnology.co.uk/Article/enabling-the-future-of-online-learning-via-human-connection

Share on Facebook

Can We Design Online Learning Platforms That Feel More Intimate Than Massive?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by Giving Compass

Most of our energy has been focused on designing physical learning spaces, even as more teaching and learning shifts online. Unfortunately, most massive open online course (MOOC) platforms still feel like drafty lecture halls instead of intimate seminar rooms. The majority of online learning environments are no more than video-hosting platforms with quizzes and a discussion forum. These default features force online instructors to use a style of teaching that feels more like shouting to the masses than engaging in meaningful conversations.

https://givingcompass.org/article/can-we-design-online-learning-platforms-that-feel-more-intimate-than-massive/

Share on Facebook

5 Amazing Student Success Stories from India

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

By Prachi Mishra, Udacity

Each of these 5 students earned a scholarship from Google and Udacity, and they’ve used their opportunities to achieve incredible things in their lives and their careers. Back in 2017, Google Scholarships launched in India with a mission to help 30,000 students pursue their dreams of venturing into mobile and web development. Today, so many exceptional students have earned new opportunities for themselves through the Udacity-Google Scholarship program. Their stories are amazing, and we share five of them with you here.

5 Amazing Student Success Stories from India

Share on Facebook

July 21, 2018

Measuring Non-Degree Credential Attainment

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

BY JENNA LEVENTOFF, National Skills Coalition

The Workforce Data Quality Campaign (WDQC) has surveyed all fifty states, and the District of Columbia, to learn whether states are collecting individual-level data about non-degree credentials, incorporating that data into their SLDS, evaluating attainment by subpopulation, and identifying
credentials of value. This scan finds that no state has comprehensive data about all types of non-degree credentials. States are the most likely to have data about public for-credit certificate programs, registered apprenticeship certificates, and licenses. Thirty-six states report having most or all individual-level data on for-credit certificates from public two-year institutions in their state. Twenty-seven states report having most or all data about registered apprenticeship certificates, and twenty-two states report having most or all licensing data.

https://www.nationalskillscoalition.org/resources/publications/file/Measuring-Non-Degree-Credential-Attainment-50-State-Scan.pdf

Share on Facebook

College Opportunity at Risk

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by Institute for Research in Higher Education, University of Pennsylvania

The College Opportunity Risk Assessment is the first state-by-state analytic tool to consider the breadth of the policy landscape that must be navigated to ensure future educational opportunity. All states face risks to college opportunity, but each state faces different types and levels of risk within their diverse economic and social realities. To guide state policy makers in mitigating these risks, we offer individual state risk assessments based on four interrelated risk categories—higher education performance, educational equity, public funding and productivity, and economic policies that influence public revenue and budgeting.

https://irhe.gse.upenn.edu/College-Opportunity-at-Risk

Share on Facebook

University of Iowa axes 7 centers due to reduced state funding

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:01 am

By James Paterson, Education Dive
The University of Iowa is closing seven centers and cutting funding to five more in the next year to save an estimated $3.6 million and to make up for revenue lost in state budget cuts. The move will eliminate 33 jobs, according to the Des Moines Register. The centers to be closed are dedicated to a variety of specialties, including workplace-related training, dentist recruitment, relations with China, farm safety and understanding the aging process. In the past decade, the University of Iowa, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa have relied increasingly on tuition as their revenue source, raising 63% from students last year compared to 49% in 2008. State aid dropped 17% in that period to 32% of revenue for the three state public universities.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/university-of-iowa-axes-7-centers-due-to-reduced-state-funding/527590/

Share on Facebook

July 20, 2018

Creatively nudging faculty members to expand use of immersive technology

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

by James Paterson, Education dive
Colleges and universities find it isn’t easy to get faculty to use immersive technologies, but some are having success by introducing them to the new tools in creative ways. Campus Technology recently reviewed the efforts by some institutions to move educators toward using the new technology. Officials advocating for use of immersive technology at institutions point out several hurdles that are hindering its development – from tight budgets for these less-accepted teaching methods, to finding time to instruct professors how to use them. They have improved the response by introducing virtual reality or immersive experiences in casual settings to faculty members, by showing them examples of how it can be used and by proving its value by gathering data about its effectiveness in the classroom.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/creatively-nudging-faculty-members-to-expand-use-of-immersive-technology/527468/

Share on Facebook

Making Learning Without Borders a Reality

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

by Tutaleni Asino and Phil Tietjen, Educause Review

One of our shared interests is using social networking technologies not only to build local learning communities but to expand those communities beyond our classrooms. On the surface, this sounds obvious since these tools are often associated with making connections and bringing students together regardless of time and place. However, what we found is somewhat paradoxical: While faculty members are usually interested in using social networking technologies to build learning communities within their specific classes, we saw far fewer instances of engagement in collaborative learning activities with classes from other universities. This suggests another kind of border that we educators could work more earnestly toward addressing. We set out to contribute to this effort by designing a small-scale collaborative project between two classes from our respective schools by using the video discussion tool Flipgrid.

https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2018/6/making-learning-without-borders-a-reality

Share on Facebook

Peer Evaluation as a Learning and Assessment Strategy at the School of Business at Simon Fraser University, British Columbia

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:03 am

by Teach Online Canada

The tool collects student feedback data and uses it to adjust the grades for the group assignments using the logical structure of team-based learning (TBL). In the peer evaluation assignment students assess their group members on teamwork dimensions that are pre-identified by the instructor for example, “preparation”, “contribution” and “collaboration.” Students evaluate each of their teammates on a Likert scale and provide written comments that surface practices which are perceived to help or hinder team performance. The final grades for group assignments are automatically adjusted by the feedback from the group members received through the peer evaluation assignment(s) using the team based learning logic. After screening by the instructor, each student receives an anonymized summary of qualitative comments from group members and the instructor receives a compiled report for the whole class. Finally, to close the loop, students write a short, graded reflection on what they have learned from the process of giving and receiving feedback.

https://teachonline.ca/pockets-innovation/peer-evaluation-learning-and-assessment-strategy-school-business-simon-fraser-university-british

Share on Facebook

July 19, 2018

Can We Design Online Learning Platforms That Feel More Intimate Than Massive?

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

By Amy Ahearn, EdSurge

Most of our energy has been focused on designing physical learning spaces, even as more teaching and learning shifts online. Unfortunately, most massive open online course (MOOC) platforms still feel like drafty lecture halls instead of intimate seminar rooms. The majority of online learning environments are no more than video-hosting platforms with quizzes and a discussion forum. These default features force online instructors to use a style of teaching that feels more like shouting to the masses than engaging in meaningful conversations. This presents a challenge and an opportunity: How can we design online learning environments that achieve scale and intimacy? How do we make digital platforms feel as inviting as well-designed physical classrooms?

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-07-09-can-we-design-online-learning-platforms-that-feel-more-intimate-than-massive

Share on Facebook

A College Prices Its Online Programs 60% Less

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

By Mark Lieberman, Inside Higher Ed

Berklee College of Music’s online program, priced at just over a third of tuition for the Massachusetts institution’s face-to-face degree offerings, raised eyebrows when it got off the ground in 2013. Conventional wisdom that online programs require more resources to produce had taken hold, and pricing models that favor online students were few and far between. Five years later, Berklee remains an anomaly in higher ed, as most institutions continue to charge the same or more for online programs as for their face-to-face equivalents. Some arguments hinge on a philosophical belief that online education should be valued equivalently to face-to-face programs, while others emphasize the significant financial burden of designing and launching online courses from scratch.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/07/11/berklee-college-music-defies-conventional-wisdom-low-price

Share on Facebook

OPMs: Pitfalls and opportunities.

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

What do you think of the online program management (OPM) industry? If you are like many higher ed people that I speak with, your answer may not be all that positive. Higher ed people simply don’t like the idea of long contract lock-ins (usually between five and 10 years) and revenue share arrangements that send half to three-quarters of tuition dollars to for-profit companies. Is it possible to be a critical and clear-eyed observer of the OPM industry and still believe that an OPM partnership should be on the table as institutions consider new online programs? I think the answer is yes, as I’ve come to believe that (a) the OPM industry is more complicated and nuanced than we often think, and (b) we need to think about OPM partnerships in a different way.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/blogs/technology-and-learning/5-misconceptions-about-online-program-management

Share on Facebook

July 18, 2018

5 things every college must know about cloud computing

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:10 am

BY KEITH RAJECKI, eCampus News

Many universities have been relatively slow to embrace the cloud for a few simple reasons. First, because it’s not always cheap or easy to overhaul IT systems. And second, because cloud represents a fundamental technological change and perceived challenges that many organizations do not feel they have the expertise, bandwidth, or resources to address.

Fortunately, there are ways around these challenges, and it starts by remembering that cloud computing is part of a journey to a modern campus—not the ultimate destination. What’s needed is a strategic approach that combines on-premise services with advanced cloud solutions.

5 things every college must know about cloud computing

Share on Facebook

STRAIGHTERLINE LAUNCHES NEW PARTNERSHIP WITH NEW ENGLAND COLLEGE

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:05 am

byBeth Dumbauld, Straighter Line

StraighterLine, the student success and college readiness company, and the New Hampshire-based New England College have partnered to offer students an accelerated associate degree pathway program. New England College will use more than 20 of StraighterLine’s online general education credits for this new program, helping create an affordable and flexible option for students that costs less than $10,000. Offered 100% online, this accelerated program is offered thought the college’s School of Graduate and Professional Studies and provides students an opportunity to earn an Associate of Arts in Professional Studies in as little as 15 months. Interested students will start by successfully completing a free credit-bearing course. Once enrolled, remaining tuition is $9,900 for the entire 60-credit program and financial aid is available. Classes start August 20, 2018.

https://www.straighterline.com/press/straighterline-launches-new-partnership-new-england-college-offer-new-englands-affordable-associate-degree/

Share on Facebook

Accreditor clears path for $1.9 billion Strayer-Capella merger

Filed under: Online Learning News — Ray Schroeder @ 12:02 am

by Autumn A. Arnett, Education Dive
The merger between Capella University’s parent company, Capella Education Company, and Strayer Education Inc., the parent company of Strayer University, has been approved by the Higher Learning Commission and is expected to close on or before Aug. 1. The resulting company will be named Strategic Education Inc., according to a July 9 Security Exchange Commission filing.  The $1.9 billion deal will create one of the largest for-profit companies in the country, serving roughly 80,000 students between them. The two institutions will continue to operate as “independent and separately accredited institutions.”  Strayer shareholders will own 52% of the combined stock and Capella shareholders will own 48%.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/accreditor-clears-path-for-19-billion-strayer-capella-merger/527421/

Share on Facebook
« Newer PostsOlder Posts »

Powered by WordPress