Educational Technology

June 13, 2017

High School gets online facilitator

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:29 am

by Jason Wheeler, Prescotr Valley Tribune

“By the time a spot opened up for the waiting list, 35 of those students had gone elsewhere,” he said, beginning the discussion for a new facilitator for the school’s online program. “By the opportunity for us to expand our online school at the west campus, the facilitator’s position will be needed so we do not have to provide a waiting list.” Board Member Paul Leon asked if the required second traditional lab and laptop carts was something that already acquired or would have to be purchase, he was told that during the summer, information services would move one of the main campus’ computer labs to the west high school and the purchase of the laptop carts was already on the schedule.

https://www.pvtrib.com/news/2017/may/24/high-school-gets-online-facilitator/

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June 12, 2017

Online Education Doesn’t Have to Be Isolating

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:39 am

By Sarah Carr, Slate

Bronx Arena is a “last chance” high school—one of a rapidly growing number of them that rely at least partially on online learning and aim to serve students who’ve been kicked out, dropped out, or simply checked out of traditional educational settings. Like these other new programs, Bronx Arena takes advantage of online curricula to help its students—many of them older than average and way behind on course credits—advance as fast as possible toward graduation. But unlike most of their peers, Bronx Arena’s leaders knew when they opened the school seven years ago that online courses alone would be insufficient to educate teenagers well—particularly the academically struggling students they serve.

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/schooled/2017/05/bronx_arena_is_doing_online_credit_recovery_right.html

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Take These Students, Please

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

By Francesca Berardi, Slate

Schools across the country are pursuing an extreme form of online learning: It’s all their struggling students do. Virtual schools have existed for years, but alternative programs like Bridgescape, where students at risk of dropping out come to brick-and-mortar schools or centers to complete a mostly online curriculum, represent a newer phenomenon. Nationally, the major for-profit providers include Ombudsman, which runs more than 100 programs in 14 states, including three sites in Chicago; Catapult Academy (a division of the New Jersey–based Catapult Learning), which runs more than 20 alternative high school programs in Georgia and Florida; and AdvancePath, which runs 10 programs (located inside traditional schools) in five states. In Chicago, the main providers are Magic Johnson Bridgescape and Ombudsman, both for-profit, and Pathways, a nonprofit.

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/schooled/2017/05/chicago_now_has_schools_where_online_learning_is_all_the_kids_do.html

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Where do teachers turn for tech help?

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

by Matthew Lynch, tech Edvocate

Being a teacher and being a technology expert are two very different professions, and although some teachers are also technology experts, many teachers are left in the dark with regards to technology. Where can teachers go for technology assistance in our very technology heavy 21st century? For some teachers, especially those who have more experience, and are inching towards retirement, advances in technology are happening too quickly for teachers to keep up with the changes.  The first place many teachers are looking for help regarding technology issues is the internet. Within the last 30 years, the internet has become the primary source of information sharing worldwide. According to a 2016 survey taken by the thejournal.com, 37% of teachers go directly online to look for help regarding the use of new technologies in the classroom. The second largest category where teachers seek help is not surprisingly peers at 23%.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/teachers-turn-technology-assistance/

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June 11, 2017

5 ways teachers can improve student learning based on current brain research

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

BY MARTHA BURNS, eSchool News

The brain is an experience-dependent organ. From our very earliest days, the brain begins to map itself to our world as we experience it through our senses. The mapping is vague and fuzzy at first, like a blurred photograph or an un-tuned piano. However, the more we interact with the world, the more well-defined our brain maps become until they are fine-tuned and differentiated. But each person’s map will vary, with some sensory experiences more distinct than others depending on the unique experiences and the clarity and frequency of the sensations he or she has experienced. Educators can positively influence students’ learning by understanding how the brain is shaped by their early experiences—and how it can be rewired and reorganized to work more quickly and efficiently.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2017/05/24/teachers-plastic-brain-research/

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Malicious Cyber Capability Is Spreading. How Do We Stop It?

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

By Robert Morgus, Future Tense

Because of difficulties associated with pushing patches designed to block an exploit out to the public—it takes a long time for everyone to click on those annoying little security updates, and some portion of the population never will—open-sourcing exploits like this is often a bad idea. It simultaneously notifies the software manufacturers and potential attackers of the bug. The Shadow Brokers/WannaCry case is just one demonstration of the growing challenge of countering the spread of malicious cyber capability. The code for Carberp (a “botnet creation kit”) was posted online and precipitated the outbreak of the Carbanak malware used to steal cash from ATMs. Rumors persist that versions of the BlackEnergy trojan—twice leveraged to shut off portions of the Ukrainian power grid—have been floating around in malware forums.

http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2017/05/it_s_easier_than_ever_to_launch_a_large_scale_attack_like_wannacry.html

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Educational Technology Leadership and Practice in Higher Education: The Emergence of Threshold Concepts

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:32 am

by Adam Barger, Educause Review

Navigating the world of educational technology in higher education environments is an increasingly rewarding, yet challenging, endeavor. What must leaders know in order to thrive in the ever-changing space of educational technology? How can leaders and practitioners alike excel in cultivating and utilizing powerful educational technology applications, tools, and resources? In this blog, I explore these questions through the lens of threshold concepts as applied to technology in higher education teaching and learning. I propose three threshold concepts in our field, discuss their prevalence at the 2017 ELI Annual Meeting, and suggest their implications for leadership and practice.

http://er.educause.edu/blogs/2017/5/educational-technology-leadership-and-practice-in-higher-education

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June 10, 2017

How to build effective online courses through social media marketing

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:39 am

By Anthony Carranza, Born2Invest

When it comes to marketing or profiling your next best venture you need to think about who your audience is above everything else. Once you have a niche market you can start to develop your business scheme and build your brand. It is important to note that in order to launch an online course you must have had some previous experience using social media, and have a track record. So, what are the four broad steps to consider launching an online course?

https://born2invest.com/articles/online-courses-social-media-marketing/

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10 Tips for Creating and Selling Online Courses

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

by Gabrielle Pickard-Whitehead, Small Business Trends

Creating courses to sell online is a great way to funnel your expertise into a rewarding and profitable channel. If you’re an expert, specialist or highly knowledgeable in a certain area, why not share your knowledge to a global audience and earn some money as you do so? Of course, successfully creating and selling online courses takes time, knowledge and commitment. To shed some light on how to effectively create and sell courses online, Small Business Trends spoke to David Siteman Garland, the creator of The Rise To The Top and Create Awesome Online Courses. David helps people create and sell online courses, and has assisted more than 3,500 students in over 100 countries to create successful courses, on everything from baby sleep training to clarinet lessons for adults.

https://smallbiztrends.com/2017/05/creating-and-selling-online-courses.html

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11 ways to make your online course go global | Expert column

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

By Sarah Cordiner, Inside Business

I have over 40 online courses, have built close to 1,000 courses for other people and have more than 7,000 students enrolled in my online courses in over 130 countries. Here’s some tips I’ve used to grow my global student base. Break it up into its smallest parts. Consumers are now in control of their knowledge because they have the power to jump onto a search engine and ask “How to xxx.” A great way to rapidly go global is to start providing your audience with those answers. If your content appears as the result for every “how to” question your audience has, then it is your courses they are going to buy. Here’s what to do: Write down every question your audience has on your topic, write a simple “tip” answer to each question and record that answer as a video.

http://pilotonline.com/inside-business/news/columns/ways-to-make-your-online-course-go-global-expert-column/article_43264387-0816-5ae6-be49-7bff487d0b96.html

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June 9, 2017

Why Professors Shouldn’t Ban Smart Phones

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

by Matt Lynch, tech Edvocate

As smartphones have become more common, educators have struggled with the question of what to do with smartphones in the classroom. For K-12 educators, the answer has been to ban smartphones from the classroom completely. College professors have also banned smartphones in increasing numbers. But now there’s some evidence to suggest that banning smartphones in the college classroom isn’t such a good idea. A study conducted by researchers in Singapore found that undergraduate students who were allowed to keep their phones with them actually scored better on tasks that measured their cognitive functioning. Even when they weren’t allowed to use their phones, students who were allowed to keep their phones in their pockets performed better than students whose phones were confiscated.

http://www.theedadvocate.org/professors-shouldnt-ban-smartphones/

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Elon Musk Just Unveiled Breakthrough AI Research. Here’s What You Need to Know.

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:36 am

by Kristin Houser, Futurism

Elon Musk co-founded artificial intelligence non-profit OpenAI just announced it has created an AI system that can learn to complete a task in reality after watching just one demonstration of that task in a simulated environment. The research company co-founded and chaired by Elon Musk used two separate neural networks to develop its one-shot imitation learning system. The first, a vision network, analyzes an image from the robot’s camera to determine the location of objects in reality. The second, an imitation network, determines the intent of a task it observes a human demonstrating via a virtual simulation. It then imitates the task in the real-world setting. Again, this network was trained on thousands of virtual demonstrations, but none that took place in reality.

https://futurism.com/elon-musk-just-unveiled-breakthrough-ai-research-heres-what-your-need-to-know/

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Four students earn college associate degrees before graduating from high school

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:28 am

by EARL HORLYK, Sioux City Journal

On May 18, Cortney Nelson walked across the stage at the Tyson Events Center to accept her associate degree from Western Iowa Tech Community College. Just eight days later, the 18-year-old Sioux City girl will also be accepting her high school diploma after graduating from Siouxland Christian School. Wait, Cortney’s graduating from high school and community college at the same time? “Actually if you go by the order of commencement ceremonies, I’ll be graduating community college and, then, high school,” she explained, noting that Siouxland Christian School is set to take place on Friday. “It’s weird how that worked out.

http://siouxcityjournal.com/lifestyles/local/four-students-earn-college-associate-degrees-before-graduating-from-high/article_d18c3567-78ce-56c8-adec-2046fbc35fa4.html

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June 8, 2017

This computer language is teaching kids to code

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

by Steven Levy, Backchannel

Last year, I went to Nigeria with Mark Zuckerberg. One of the first stops on the trip was a program that taught kids how to code. “What are you making?” he’d ask. And they would proudly say, “A game!” or whatever it was, and begin showing him how it works. Zuckerberg would stop them. “Show me the code!” he’d say, because, well, he’s Zuckerberg, and any occasion is ripe for an ad hoc programming review. And that’s when the kid would click on a menu that toggled from the game to the LEGO-like building blocks of a Scratch program. As we headed up the stairs to leave the building, Zuckerberg called out to me, “Scratch! Have you heard of this?” Scratch (developed just a couple of T stops away) is quickly becoming the world’s most popular computer language for kids taking their first bite of programming. Last year, over 120 million people came to its site.

http://www.businessinsider.com/this-computer-language-is-teaching-kids-to-code-2017-5

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Young ‘Geniuses’ keep computers running for Discovery Middle School

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

By Celeste Edenloff, Echo Press

With a tiny screwdriver in his hands, Dylan Nelson set out to put back together a Chromebook he was in the process of rebuilding. A couple of feet away, Shayna Steidl was in the process of ripping apart a Chromebook she had been given to try and fix. Nelson, an eighth-grader, and Steidl, a seventh-grader, share a love for computers. And just like most of their peers at Discovery Middle School in Alexandria, these two students use their computers for homework, as well as gaming and watching videos on YouTube. But for Nelson and Steidl, their interest in computers goes much deeper as these two students, along with six other middle school students, are part of the newly formed Genius Team.

http://www.echopress.com/news/4265039-young-geniuses-keep-computers-running-discovery-middle-school

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LSC-O offers hybrid classes

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:27 am

by the Orange Leader

In an effort to provide learning opportunities to the busiest people, Lamar State College – Orange (LSC-O) is reaching out to another category of non-traditional students. Starting in the Fall 2017 semester, students have the chance to complete an Associate’s degree program by attending hybrid classes only one day a week. Cleverly dubbed ‘One day a Week for a Two-Year Degree’, the courses are for anyone with a demanding schedule but still desires to enhance their skills and earn a degree.

http://www.orangeleader.com/2017/05/20/lsc-o-offers-hybrid-classes/

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June 7, 2017

Competency-Based Education in Action: School Districts Share Advice

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

by THE Journal

Digital Promise, a national nonprofit organization authorized by Congress, and Education Elements, an education company, yesterday released several free resources that are designed to help districts through competency-based education (CBE) implementation. First, the “Competency-based Education Toolkit” catalogs a year’s worth of actionable advice and lessons learned from district leaders within the League of Innovative Schools, a national network of K–12 district leaders. The toolkit also includes a video series that showcases the power of competency-based education, cross-district collaboration and open education resources from leaders in several school districts.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/05/19/competency-based-education-in-action-school-districts-share-advice.aspx

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6 VR Trends to Watch in Education

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:36 am

By Sri Ravipati, Campus Technology

Virtual reality is taking off in higher education. VR devices are expected to increase 85 percent by 2020, with gaming and educational applications driving most of that growth. But what areas of VR should educators specifically focus on and what tech can they look out for? “We can expect to see certain trends in VR to move forward, while others will disappear. As devices continue to shrink we will see the development of augmented and mixed reality experiences that will power compelling visualizations, immersive storytelling, gamified simulations and learning experiences,” said Maya Georgieva, an ed tech strategist, author and speaker with more than 15 years of experience in higher education and global education.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/16/6-vr-trends-to-watch-in-education.aspx

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Designing Your Online Course: Learning From an Expert

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

By Richard Chang, THE Journal

I always start off with this question: “Have you ever felt inept, because you tried to open a door the wrong way?” There are these types of doors called Norman doors. You get confused about whether to pull instead of push, or vice versa. Don Norman was the author of The Design of Everyday Things. In the case of Norman doors, it’s poor design. If you’re opening a door the wrong way, that’s a fleeting moment. But if you start off a course on the wrong foot, because it’s poorly designed, that sets the tone for the whole rest of a student’s experience with the course. We look at a teacher-developed course. We look at that first walking through the door — when the student begins, is there stumbling around? That’s one of the first things we’ll do in that workshop.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/05/19/designing-your-online-course-learning-from-an-expert.aspx

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June 6, 2017

Tablets at the Table Can Influence a Child – Not always in a Positive Way

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

by Matthew Lynch, tech Edvocate

Research shows that 75% to 80% of parents now use technology to placate or distract children, for example on a long car trip, waiting for a doctor’s appointment, when mum or dad is cooking dinner, or when it’s nap time. While this strategy works, it raises important questions about how children will develop all the social skills they need for our world. Screens may ward off kids’ complaints (or complaints from adults around us) but we’re doing children a disservice if our go-to strategy is always to use technology to keep them quiet.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/tablets-table-can-influence-child-development-not-always-good-way/

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Trump’s first full education budget: Deep cuts to public school programs in pursuit of school choice

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:34 am

By Emma Brown, Valerie Strauss and Danielle Douglas-Gabriel, Washington Post

Funding for college work-study programs would be cut in half, public-service loan forgiveness would end and hundreds of millions of dollars that public schools could use for mental health, advanced coursework and other services would vanish under a Trump administration plan to cut $10.6 billion from federal education initiatives, according to budget documents obtained by The Washington Post. The administration would channel part of the savings into its top priority: school choice. It seeks to spend about $400 million to expand charter schools and vouchers for private and religious schools, and another $1 billion to push public schools to adopt choice-friendly policies.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/trumps-first-full-education-budget-deep-cuts-to-public-school-programs-in-pursuit-of-school-choice/2017/05/17/2a25a2cc-3a41-11e7-8854-21f359183e8c_story.html

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