How to Teach Students to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information

August 13th, 2015

By Leigh Ann Whittle, Edudemic

The volume of information available on the Internet is astounding, and it just keeps growing. Business intelligence company DOMO estimates that 571 new websites are created every minute. With that amount of information, it can be difficult for students to separate the gems from the garbage. Julie Coiro, associate professor of education at the University of Rhode Island,says author and publication type are of limited importance to students, and if they do examine these elements, they can’t explain why they chose certain websites. Coiro suggests strategies to help students to effectively evaluate what they see on the Internet, practice refuting what is on the Internet, and cross-check claims. In other words, becoming critical consumers of online material means more than just viewing a website. It requires knowing what qualifies as quality content and how to judge what is good material and what is not.

http://www.edudemic.com/teach-students-evaluate-information/

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Blended Learning Leaders Are Over the Honeymoon—and Rolling Up Their Sleeves

August 13th, 2015

by Alex Hernandez, EdSurge

This summer, I spoke to leaders at six public charter school networks who are now wily veterans in the art of blending teacher-led instruction with online learning–also known as “blended learning”. Their titles range from Innovation Manager to Director of Individualized Learning, meaning they work directly with teachers to effectively incorporate edtech in the classroom. I asked them one question: What has you jumping out of bed and rushing to work, in regards to blended learning? In short: finding out what learning software is working for students; making edtech tools usable for teachers; putting better data in the hands of teachers and students; and–now that they know enough to be dangerous–designing 2.0 versions of their school models.

https://www.edsurge.com/n/2015-08-03-blended-learning-leaders-are-over-the-honeymoon-and-rolling-up-their-sleeves

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The first 10 jobs that will be automated by AI and robots

August 13th, 2015

By Conner Forrest, ZDNet

Robots have been working alongside human employees in industries such as manufacturing for a long time, helping accomplish tasks quicker or more efficiently. But, as the fields of cognitive computing and artificial intelligence continue to grow, we will see many more industries — from the food industry to customer service — affected by automation. A 2013 research paper out of the Oxford Martin School in the UK estimates that roughly 47 percent of the total US jobs are at risk of computerization or automation. Some of these are jobs for which we are offering college degrees and/or certificates.  That means almost half of the jobs in the US could end up being automated. But, which will be the first to go? Here are 10 jobs that will be at the top of the list.

http://www.zdnet.com/article/the-first-10-jobs-that-will-be-automated-by-ai-and-robots/

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University of Connecticut says hit by hackers from China

August 12th, 2015

BY RICHARD WEIZEL, Reuters

The social security numbers and credit card details of up to 6,000 University of Connecticut students, faculty and others may have been stolen by cyberhackers from China, the university said on Friday. Officials detected a potential breach of the School of Engineering’s network in March and an investigation uncovered that hackers may have gained access to it as early as September, 2013, spokesman Tom Breen said. He said 6,000 students, faculty, alumni and research partners of the school were notified that their personal information may have been compromised.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/07/31/us-usa-connecticut-cyberattack-idUSKCN0Q52I320150731

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Online courses offer students an education option

August 12th, 2015

by Atlanta 11 Alive

Online classes are skyrocketing in popularity as high school kids take advantage of technology, but do they really work? Cobb County was the first school district to offer online classes in Georgia all the way back in 2001. However, that doesn’t mean some kids are not having a little trouble getting the hang of it. “I had to work really hard to make sure I didn’t procrastinate,” sophomore Garrett Davis said. Now that he’s taken three, he says he’s gotten the swing of it. Senior Grace Arnold has been taking them her entire high school career – and she’s got it down. “It’s a lot of knowing yourself, knowing your schedule, planning beforehand,” Arnold said

http://www.11alive.com/story/news/local/2015/08/03/online-courses-offer-students-a-education-option/30929891/

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More than half of PRCC classes to use e-books

August 12th, 2015

By Karrie Leggett-Brown, WDAM

Students enrolling at Pearl River Community College this fall will have fewer expensive, heavy textbooks to carry to class. Approximately 60 percent of academic classes will be using eBooks. “We are not requiring it of the teachers but we strongly encourage it,” said Dr. Martha Lou Smith, vice president for general education and technology. “It provides a great opportunity for our students and is a way for us to move forward.” Most students will pay significantly less for an eBook than for a new textbook, said Candace Harper, PRCC director of bookstore services. Harper calculated a savings of $307 for eBooks instead of new textbooks for a student taking English composition, psychology, anatomy and physiology, human growth and development and world civilization.

http://www.wdam.com/story/29682566/more-than-half-of-prcc-classes-will-use-e-books

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The Chief Privacy Officer in Higher Education

August 11th, 2015

by Valerie M. Vogel

This article includes a wealth of information about how some members of the Higher Education Chief Privacy Officers group perceive their role, their concerns about privacy, and their expectations for the future of privacy officers in higher education.

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/chief-privacy-officer-higher-education

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What’s Next for the LMS?

August 11th, 2015

by Malcolm Brown, Joanne Dehoney, and Nancy Millichap; EDUCAUSE Review

Today’s LMS needs to be supplemented with (and perhaps later replaced by) a new digital architecture and new learning components—the NGDLE—to enable current transitions in higher education.

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/whats-next-lms

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Ed Tech as Applied Research: A Framework in Seven Hypotheses

August 11th, 2015

by Edward R. O’Neill, EDUCAUSE Review

Seven hypotheses explore the feasibility of educational technology — typically considered as supporting teaching and learning — as applied research by providing an initial framework built on traditional research processes. New knowledge results from research, usually about fundamental questions, but ed tech pursues applied research about practical problems using qualitative and quantitative methods and local standards. Seeing ed tech as research emphasizes the collaborative nature of our work by helping shape our conversations about the knowledge we create, its standards, and its methods.

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/ed-tech-applied-research-framework-seven-hypotheses

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The Ultimate Guide to Gamifying Your Classroom

August 10th, 2015

By Amanda Ronan, Edudemic

No one wants to been seen as the stuffy teacher stuck in the past who lectures from the front of the classroom and doesn’t seem to care about student engagement. Students today are tech savvy and have wandering minds. They are able to process information coming at them from several channels at a time—walking, talking, and texting. Changing up how you deliver classroom content can keep kids’ attention, draw on their strengths, engage them as lifelong learners, and be amazingly fun. What is this magical method? It’s gamification, a word that, according to Merriam Webster’s online dictionary, wasn’t even in use until 2010.

http://www.edudemic.com/ultimate-guide-gamifying-classroom/

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How IT Will Elevate Educational Access and Quality

August 10th, 2015

By David Weldon, Campus Technology

Education stands at a crossroads today, currently unable to produce enough skilled graduates to satisfy the workforce, but with the tools to fundamentally change the way in which knowledge is delivered, to a huge new audience, and with greater quality of learning. That is the vision of Paul LeBlanc, president of Southern New Hampshire University, who spoke at the Campus Technology conference in Boston Tuesday about the ‘Climate change crisis’ facing today’s colleges and universities. LeBlanc said he sees technology as central to the next evolutionary step in higher education, and he challenged colleges and universities to embrace and expand efforts around distance learning. The goal is not just to add enrollment numbers but to be able to offer classes, programs and degrees to those who have never had such opportunities before.

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/07/28/how-it-will-elevate-educational-access-and-quality.aspx

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This drag-and-drop app teaches coding like a puzzle

August 10th, 2015

by eSchool News

New version of ‘Blockly’ app helps teachers introduce coding, programming concepts into the classroom. While the economic demand for computer science skills continues to surge, introducing coding to the classroom can be an intimidating overture for teachers without a technical background. To ease this transition, Wonder Workshop, creators of smart robots that teach students the basics of coding, has developed a new version of the Blockly touch app in consultation with education experts. Through drag-and-drop programming and diverse puzzles, the app’s new content brings coding to life during STEM instruction. Students use the app to program Dash & Dot robots to sense and react to the world around them.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/07/30/coding-touch-app-652/

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New bill would increase free access to research

August 9th, 2015

by eCampus News

Libraries cheer passage of strong open access legislation in U.S. Senate. Public access to federally-funded research took one move forward with the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs’ vote to support the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act of 2015 (FASTR). The legislation would accelerate scientific discovery and fuel innovation by making articles reporting on publicly-funded scientific research freely accessible online for anyone to read and build upon.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/access-to-research-543/

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With technology, schools try to level the economic playing field

August 9th, 2015

By Christina Veiga, Miami Herald

Researchers are learning that not all access to technology is equal. In fact, a growing body of evidence suggests that more technology may contribute to opportunity gaps between the rich and the poor. For example, a 2014 University of Connecticut study found that lower-income students were worse at locating and evaluating online information than their higher-income peers. “The digital divide still exists. It just exists differently than it ever has before,” said Susan Neuman, a professor of early literacy at New York University who has studied the issue. The findings have dramatic impacts on schools as technology becomes ubiquitous in classrooms.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/07/31/technology-opportunity-893/

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Internet learning boosts performance by seven years, Sugata Mitra study finds

August 9th, 2015

by Joseph Lee, tes

Pupils can perform at more than seven years above their expected academic level by using the internet, a pioneering study has concluded. Professor Sugata Mitra found that eight- and nine-year-olds who were allowed to do online research before answering GCSE questions remembered what they had learned three months later when tested under exam conditions. Now the Newcastle University academic is giving undergraduate-level exams to 14-year-olds, and has told TES that these students are also achieving results far beyond their chronological age.

https://www.tes.co.uk/news/school-news/breaking-news/internet-learning-boosts-performance-seven-years-sugata-mitra-study

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The Pros and Cons of Online Engineering Masters Degrees

August 8th, 2015

by Shawn Wasserman, Engineering.com

Many engineers are opting to start their masters in an attempt to stay ahead in the post-2008 economy. With a master’s degree, students are able to gain a level of specialization or management overview that can make them invaluable in industry. However, finding the time and money to get on campus everyday can be difficult, especially if interferes with work. Fortunately, the technology behind online education has made leaps and bounds to the point where schools and industry treat both degrees interchangeably. As a result, many schools like Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) are creating more and more online masters programs to fit the demand.

http://www.engineering.com/Education/EducationArticles/ArticleID/10483/The-Pros-and-Cons-of-Online-Engineering-Masters-Degrees.aspx

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Technology and the Future of Learning

August 8th, 2015

by Amit Nagpal, ATD

The learning and development (L&D) world has evolved quite rapidly during the last four to five years. Khan Academy has championed video-based learning; massive open online courses (MOOCs) have also become a popular instruction method. Then there is learning delivered though smartphones, tablets, and cloud-based applications, not to mention the increase in webinars, podcasts, and social media–based offerings across the digital world.

https://www.td.org/Publications/Blogs/Global-HRD-Blog/2015/07/Technology-and-the-Future-of-Learning

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Florida’s virtual school options boom

August 8th, 2015

BY KATHRYN W. FOSTER, Miami Herald

The school day for gymnast Tyler Harriman begins shortly after 6 a.m. He squeezes in two hours of classes online before heading to the gym for a full day of practice. When he returns home at 5 p.m., Tyler said, “I eat dinner, take a shower and go and do school until about 10 p.m.” The 16-year-old is one of more than 300 full-time students at the Miami-Dade Online Academy, the only Dade public school offering a “virtual” education from kindergarten through 12th grade. Going to school online offers him flexibility that traditional classes don’t provide — but adds new demands.

http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/education/article29241610.html

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Moving Course Apps from Traditional to Media-Rich, Interactive Designs

August 7th, 2015

By Mary Grush with Phil Ice and Melissa Layne, Campus Technology

At the American Public University System, the success of a project to update the Internet Learning Journal — a peer-reviewed scholarly journal focused on research and advancements in online learning — with rich media and interactive elements has inspired a new initiative: APUS is building out state-of-the-art course applications to accompany the traditional LMS-based courses that serve more than 100,000 APUS students. CT asked Phil Ice, VP of Research and Development and Melissa Layne, Director of Research Methodology and Executive Editor of ILJ about the initiative.

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/07/28/moving-course-apps-from-traditional-to-media-rich-interactive-designs.aspx

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Shifting the Professional Development Paradigm for K-12 Online Learning

August 7th, 2015

by Barbara Kurshan, Forbes

Previously we discussed the landscape of online learning in higher education. The ground is shifting in K-12 education as well, and learning online is now not only an option for many students, but in some states a legislative mandate. In Alabama, Florida, Michigan, Virginia, and Idaho, students must take at least one class online in order to graduate from high school. How did we get here, and most importantly, how do we build a collaborative ecosystem for online learning experiences?

http://www.forbes.com/sites/barbarakurshan/2015/07/29/shifting-the-professional-development-paradigm-for-k-12-online-learning/

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McDonald’s employees learning “English Under the Arches”

August 7th, 2015

BY DEREK FRANCIS, Fox 17

West Michigan McDonald’s franchise owners are helping some of their employees go back to school. The workers, who all have a native language other than English, are taking a 22 week “English under the Arches” class. Fox 17 caught up with the students in the formal classroom setting in the back of a restaurant on Monday. The class is taught partly by an English Second Language instructor in person, and partly online via webcast. McDonald’s Operations Consultant Lance Brewer told Fox 17 the class is about empowering the workers, while benefitting customers.

http://fox17online.com/2015/07/27/mcdonalds-employees-learning-english-under-the-arches/

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