Ag Goes Online at Oklahoma State U

September 21st, 2016

by Oklahoma Horizon

The world of education is available with the click of the mouse. The popularity of online education lead several traditional universities to make their own courses more accessible to the public. OKLAHOMA HORIZON’s Austin Moore shares how one of those universities started their program by teaching ag online. The idea is straight forward: offer a class, offer it online, make it available to anyone and accept everyone. Hence the term, Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). Throughout this emerging industry, you’ll find courses offered for credit, some of certifications and others simply for the sake of learning. It is no small way, the wild, wild west of post-secondary education.

http://www.rfdtv.com/story/33093573/ag-goes-online-at-osu

Share on Facebook

U Idaho to use grant to study online courses for rural teachers

September 21st, 2016

by the Spokesman-Review

Teachers in rural areas will be able to advance their math education through online courses and video coaching under a $2.8 million National Science Foundation grant awarded to the University of Idaho College of Education and the University of Rochester in New York. The four-year grant from the foundation’s Discovery Research PreK-12 program will support research of an online-based professional development model. The goal is to increase the quality of professional development opportunities for rural school teachers who may have less access to such support. “This program will ensure teachers in remote areas of Idaho are receiving instructional support that will ultimately influence student learning in mathematics,” said Julie Amador, assistant professor in the UI College of Education and director of the Idaho Region 1 Match Center in Coeur d’Alene.

http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2016/sep/14/ui-to-use-grant-to-study-online-courses-for-rural-/

Share on Facebook

Study: Coding bootcamps yield high returns on job placement, diversity

September 21st, 2016

By Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

A new study authored by Course Report reveals surprising data about the economic and social benefits of the emerging for-profit training model. According to the study, more than 70% of bootcamp graduates report holding employment requiring use of the skills learned in the bootcamp, and more than 60% have received salary increases as a result of their completion. Women comprise more than 40% of the national bootcamp student profile, and African-Americans who complete coding bootcamps are the highest earners and most likely to be employed at a tech company.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/study-coding-bootcamps-yield-high-returns-on-job-placement-diversity/426349/

Share on Facebook

How to Have a Distributed Meeting

September 20th, 2016

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

My advice for running successful distributed meetings comes from what I have seen work in synchronous online learning. If you can get a synchronous online class session to run well – then you can also run a good distributed meeting. Note – my advice for distributed meetings has nothing to do with webinars. Webinars are almost bad because of issues of scale. There are too many people on most webinars to allow for meaningful conversation. Your model for good distributed meetings should not be webinars, but teaching.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/how-have-distributed-meeting

Share on Facebook

Online-based learning a focus for WISD

September 20th, 2016

by JELANI GIBSON, Weatherford Democrat

Inclusive classrooms, expansion of the learning management system Canvas, increased Google cloud platform usage and other online-based solutions to learning will be among the Weatherford Independent School District’s educational priorities for the 2016—17 school year, the district’s board of trustees were told Monday. Interconnected goals and approaches to education are important, said Dr. Lance Campbell, the school district’s secondary education director. Personalized learning for summer school students is a priority as well, Campbell said. “We typically take kids from summer school and hire teachers … we can personalize our learning experiences for those kids. That’s where the whole idea came from. Teachers were assigned and worked with them individually.” Establishing relationships and a love of learning is something of importance, Campbell said.

http://www.weatherforddemocrat.com/news/local_news/online-based-learning-a-focus-for-wisd/article_dd91f3de-7266-56c1-a6aa-a8dd0edbb0fc.html

Share on Facebook

What 6 higher ed CIOs wish they knew their first day on the job

September 20th, 2016

By Roger Riddell, Education Dive

IT leaders share their advice and words of wisdom for those aspiring to the roleThis feature is the second in a series focused exclusively on issues impacting higher ed IT administrators, running through the beginning of the annual Educause conference, Oct. 25-28. There are any number of things most people wish they had known their first day on a job. In our research for this series, we asked 6 higher ed CIOs to share their thoughts. This is what they had to say.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/what-6-higher-ed-cios-wish-they-knew-their-first-day-on-the-job/425624/

Share on Facebook

New Report on Personalized Learning Recommends Use of ‘Learner Positioning Systems’

September 19th, 2016

By Dian Schaffhauser, THE Journal

Achieving personalized learning in schools takes good technology programs, suggested a new report from Digital Promise. But it also takes something else: “learner positioning systems.” These “LPSs” are akin to a GPS, except instead of telling people where they are geographically, they’d be used to help students and their teachers get a grounding in where the students are in their learning journey. That information might cover “a map of learning topics and progressions [and] a bank of programs and resources tied to the learning map.” The use of the LPS, stated “Making Learning Personal for All: The Growing Diversity in Today’s Classroom,” would help the student “self-identify” his or her strengths, preferences and challenges, set learning goals and find the appropriate resources to help meet those goals.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/09/13/new-report-on-personalized-learning-recommends-use-of-learner-positioning-systems.aspx

Share on Facebook

Report: Most Educators Want to Try VR in Classroom

September 19th, 2016

By Dian Schaffhauser, THE Journal

Virtual reality (VR) is on the rise. Less than a quarter of educators (23 percent) have tried out VR in their schools so far, and most of that effort has been in science (52 percent) vs. history (29 percent), engineering (20 percent) or any other subject. However, the majority of educators (55 percent) surveyed said they do expect to use VR in the future, because they believe it could excite “students to learn” (68 percent), encourage “creativity” (39 percent), make “difficult concepts easier” (32 percent) and reduce the cost for “field trips” (23 percent). Those are a few of the results that came out of a survey about VR recently sponsored by Extreme Networks, which sells networking hardware, software and services. According to the company, people from 349 schools participated.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/09/07/report-most-educators-want-to-try-vr-in-classroom.aspx

Share on Facebook

Indiana U Introduces Students to High-Tech Media Production Tools

September 19th, 2016

By Sri Ravipati, Campus Technology

Two facilities at Indiana University (IU) have integrated comprehensive media platforms that enable collaboration and provide cutting-edge 3D and virtual reality studio technologies. Both The Media School and the soon-to-open Mark Cuban Center for Sports Media and Technology have adopted the Avid MediaCentral Platform and other tools from Avid Technologies to help prepare IU students for real-world media industry workflows. The MediaCentral Platform will enable students at The Media School to collaborate remotely and access projects and media from anywhere. In addition, the school will be one of the first to use Avid NEXIS, a software-storage platform that is designed to accelerate production. These tools will be used in conjunction with Avid Media Composer and Avid Pro Tools, which The Media School has used for more than 15 years.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/09/12/indiana-u-introduces-students-to-hightech-media-production-tools.aspx

Share on Facebook

Chief Information Security Officers: Moving Away from IT

September 18th, 2016

By David Raths, Campus Technology

The CISO role in higher education is evolving, putting more emphasis on enterprise risk management and policy development. As data breaches and cybercrime gain a higher profile in higher education, the role of the chief information security officer is changing — and broadening beyond IT. The increasing sense of urgency is bringing people from different backgrounds to the CISO post, and is raising questions about budgets and reporting structures as well. “Higher education is starting to recognize that cyber risk is the same as other types of business risk,” said Brian Kelly, CISO at Quinnipiac University (CT). “It is the same type of consideration as someone falling down a staircase. We are closer to those cabinet-level conversations around risk. It has gone beyond being an IT problem.”

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/09/08/chief-information-security-officers-moving-away-from-it.aspx

Share on Facebook

Penn State Turns to 3D Printing, Online Learning to Teach Students About the Brain

September 18th, 2016

By Michael Hart, Campus Technology

A Pennsylvania State University research project is exploring the use of 3D printing and interactive technology to teach middle school students about the human brain. Researchers in the Brain3M project, funded by the Penn State Social Science Research Institute, have come up with a tailored online learning platform that allows students to go through a series of virtual 3D structure models and descriptions of the brain along with photos and diagrams that illustrate the complex concepts concerning how the human brain works.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/09/13/3d-printing-online-learning-used-to-teach-students-about-the-brain.aspx

Share on Facebook

UC San Francisco Outsourcing IT Ops to India

September 18th, 2016

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

IT people are sounding sick from the announcement that the University of California San Francisco intends to outsource many of its technology functions to an India-based service provider. Reporting by Computerworld found that layoffs for some 17 percent of the institution’s 565-employee IT staff will hit next February — after those same workers have trained Indian replacements employed by HCL Technologies. The university is focused entirely on health areas, with four schools: dentistry, nursing, medicine and pharmacy. According to UCSF’s website, there are currently 3,114 students enrolled in degree programs, 1,479 residents and 1,127 post-doctoral scholars. However, that small student body belies the size of the overall institution, which is currently the second largest employer in the city. UCSF’s paid workforce comprises 22,000 staff and nearly 2,800 faculty.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/09/09/uc-san-francisco-outsourcing-it-ops-to-india.aspx

Share on Facebook

Faculty recommend new syllabi section on course hours

September 17th, 2016

by Sera Royal, GW Hatchet

Students this semester have noticed a new section on their syllabi: the minimum number of hours they are expected to spend on coursework in and out of class. As the University begins its reaccreditation process, officials have been working on adhering to the requirements set by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, the agency that accredits GW. One of the requirements is proving that a course adheres to the U.S. Department of Education’s definition of a course hour, which includes the specific number of hours students are expected to spend in and out of class. “They are also a reminder to faculty about how much work they should expect of their students.” Csellar said what constitutes a course hour has changed as new types of courses, like online courses, increase in popularity. Accrediting bodies are more likely to request documentation of the ways in which a university’s courses follow the course hour definition, she said.

http://www.gwhatchet.com/2016/09/12/faculty-recommend-new-syllabi-section-on-course-hours/

Share on Facebook

Big data transforms an e-learning business, doubling staff productivity.

September 17th, 2016

By Stacy Collett, Computerworld

When CPL Online opened for business in 2010, it offered 20,000 interactive online courses on food safety, health and safety, fire awareness and call centers. That number grew to 35,000 courses in 2011 and exploded to 160,000 by 2012. When its SQL platform couldn’t keep up anymore, CPL seized the opportunity to transform its business and deployed the HPCC Systems platform, a high-performance big data analytics system from LexisNexis Risk Solutions. CPL’s HPCC deployment uses data to track user trends, spot suspicious activity (to help root out cheaters) and identify the best-performing employees. Heat mapping shows how users work their way through every mouse-click of a course and helps CPL Online improve engagement and content.

http://www.computerworld.com/article/3117255/data-analytics/cpl-online.html

Share on Facebook

Underground Papers courses offered

September 17th, 2016

By Pineandlakes Echo Journal

The Underground Papers, a student-run newspaper registered with the National Scholastic Press Association (offering scholarship opportunities to writers), is a unique online newspaper for youth that also can be enjoyed all ages. The course is formatted for online learning/homeschool families, but can be used by anyone. The course is set up in modules, six lessons at a time. Join anytime; lessons can be adjusted to fit schedules. Students can participate in one, a couple or all of the modules.

http://www.pineandlakes.com/news/4112924-underground-papers-courses-offered

Share on Facebook

THS cuts journalism for digital media focus

September 16th, 2016

by Crystal Dominguez, Temple Telegram

Temple High School recently announced the discontinuation of its online news website, The Catalyst, after cutting their journalism class. Brad Sheffield taught journalism at the school for three years until he decided to adapt to the times. “We started examining the landscape of media and journalism and how it is ever-changing,” he said. “Obviously there is a big push at Temple ISD for technology … so we wanted to keep that trend going and for the kids sake it was probably better to focus on the video side of things from a production and journalistic standpoint.”Sheffield — who has a journalism degree from Sam Houston State and a background in public relations — said he is still teaching students the principles of journalism and incorporating them into video production and broadcasting.

http://www.tdtnews.com/news/article_41a66388-77a9-11e6-befd-df493f3b39e8.html

Share on Facebook

At Fountain Valley School, students learn, interact with global ‘classroom’

September 16th, 2016

By Debbie Kelley, the Gazette

Classroom walls don’t exist to Toni Olivier-Barton, a library technology educator at Fountain Valley School. She specializes in using technology to connect students at the private day and boarding high school in Fountain with students worldwide to do projects together. “Students need to learn at a young level that they have similarities and differences” with students from Mexico, Ireland, Kazakhstan and other countries, she said. “Kids’ eyes get opened up, and they see things sometimes adults don’t see.” Olivier-Barton is one of nearly 100 educators from around the world featured in Lindsay’s new book, “The Global Educator: Leveraging Technology for Collaborative Learning and Teaching.” The book was released in July by the International Society for Technology in Education, a nonprofit organization that focuses on enhancing education with technology. The book shares approaches, updated practices and case studies on how educators can make learning global.

http://gazette.com/at-fountain-valley-school-students-learn-interact-with-global-classroom/article/1585223

Share on Facebook

Learning, unlearning and relearning — New media comes to the rescue

September 16th, 2016

by BLOSSOM OZURUMBA, the Cable Lifestyle

Beyond the somewhat popular massive open online courses, there are other variants that are quite specific in their delivery style like the small private online courses and the synchronous massive online courses. They are all similar in the sense that you need access to the internet to participate in the learning experience. Some are free while others are paid subscriptions with options of getting certificated at the end of the learning session. I have some top favorites that have added immeasurable value to me over time and I will be sharing them below. Hopefully, you might share my excitement and please, endeavor to share with your network.

https://lifestyle.thecable.ng/learning-unlearning-relearning-new-media-comes-rescue/

Share on Facebook

For higher ed CIOs navigating tight budgets, relationships key

September 15th, 2016

by Roger Riddell, Naomi Eide; Education Dive

Of course for IT leadership on campus, it also helps to foster good relationships with the other vice presidents and provosts, as well as the campus president. “I actually report to the president, which is a real advantage because I have the president’s ear,” said Melissa Woo, vice president for information technology and CIO at Stony Brook University. “But the other VPs have to know what IT’s value is, because I think most people think IT is just keeping things running.” “It’s network that nobody notices until it’s gone,” Woo said. “It’s a lot of services that nobody really thinks about until they’re down, and I think having that relationship with the other VPs means they can actually see us as a strategic partner.”

http://www.ciodive.com/news/for-higher-ed-cios-navigating-tight-budgets-relationships-key/425875/

Share on Facebook

Marion ahead of curve in student industry certifications

September 15th, 2016

by Joe Callahan, Ocala Star Banner

Beginning July 1, 2018, the state Department of Education will require that 75 percent of all middle school students must have earned at least one Digital Tool certification. The IC3 Spark certification was offered as a pilot program at Howard and Osceola middle schools in 2015-16. Now, the course is being offered at middle schools throughout the district.

http://www.ocala.com/news/20160908/marion-ahead-of-curve-in-student-industry-certifications

Share on Facebook

Coursera bets on enterprise learning market

September 15th, 2016

by the Business Line

Online education firm Coursera has launched ‘Coursera for Business’, an enterprise platform, to tap into the USD 31-billion global corporate e-learning market. It has also roped in customers like L’Oreal, Boston Consulting Group (BCG) as well as India’s Axis Bank. “Coursera for Business enables companies to utilise Coursera’s learning content, created by 145 universities and other institutions, to help address the rapidly evolving training and development needs of their businesses,” it said in a statement. The launch marks Coursera’s entry into the multi-billion dollar global corporate online learning market, which is growing at over 10 per cent a year, it added.

http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/news/education/coursera-bets-on-enterprise-learning-market/article9086162.ece

Share on Facebook