Educational Technology

June 14, 2020

Is this the secret of smart leadership?

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Dave Robson, BBC

It’s more than two millennia since the philosopher Socrates argued that humility is the greatest of all virtues. His timeless observation was that the wisest people are the first to admit how little they really know. Science has been slow to catch up to this argument, but the last decade has offered a spate of new studies examining this trait and its effects on our thinking and reasoning. According to this research, people with greater humility are better learners, decision-makers and problem solvers. One study even found that someone’s humility could trump actual IQ in predicting their performance.

https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20200528-is-this-the-secret-of-smart-leadership

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June 13, 2020

New Skills For A New World

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Laura LeBleu, Forbes

More people are acquiring new skills from the comfort of their own homes than ever before. Online learning platforms like Coursera, Udacity, and EdX, for example, saw major spikes in course enrollment in March and April, much of it driven by workers at the direction of their employers. According to Leah Belsky, Coursera’s chief enterprise officer, course enrollment nearly tripled.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/servicenow/2020/05/30/new-skills-for-a-new-world/#c2d10ec34052

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Community college chancellor endorses going online-only this fall

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

MIKHAIL ZINSHTEYN, Daily Democrat

California’s 115 community colleges will likely remain an online system of higher education in the fall, its chancellor Eloy Ortiz Oakley said. “As we transition to the fall, many of our colleges have already announced that they’re going fully online in the fall,” Oakley said. “I encourage them to continue to do so. I fully believe that that will be the most relevant way for us to continue to reach our students and to do it in a way that commits to maintaining equity for our students.”

https://www.dailydemocrat.com/2020/05/31/california-community-college-chancellor-endorses-going-online-only-this-fall/

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Demand for online learning services soars during pandemic

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:26 am

Maryse Zeidler · CBC News

The Great Courses, MasterClass and Coursera see big rise in new subscriptions.  As the coronavirus pandemic forces many to hunker down at home, a growing number of people have turned to online learning resources like MasterClass, the Great Courses and Mango Languages. The Toronto and Vancouver public libraries say patrons have flocked to the online learning services they offer.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/online-learning-services-covid-19-1.5591100

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June 12, 2020

Digital Ethics in Higher Education: 2020

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

John O’Brien, EDUCAUSE Review

I believe we are at a crucial point in the evolution of technology. We must come to grips with digital ethics, which I define simply as “doing the right thing at the intersection of technology innovation and accepted social values.” This is a straightforward-enough definition; however, given the speed of technology change and the relativity of social values, even a simple definition may be trickier than it seems.

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2020/5/digital-ethics-in-higher-education-2020

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Are Penn State professors prepared to continue teaching online through the summer?

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Quincey Reese, The Daily Collegian

With the increased notice that courses would be online, College of Information Sciences and Technology professor Rick Winscot was better able to prepare his assigned teaching load for IST 210.  Although the future of teaching and learning at Penn State is uncertain and challenges face professors and students alike, Winscot said he feels everyone has handled the situation to the best of their ability and won’t be thrown off course — regardless of what coming semesters hold. “We are still resilient enough to handle a little shake-up from time to time,” Winscot said.

https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/education/os-ne-ucf-switch-online-courses-20200530-rnou3stbfrcbtnhvwuc5eyudlm-story.html

 

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How Online Learning will Change the Education System post Covid-19

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

David Michigan, Entrepreneur

Since the pandemic, going to schools and colleges has never been the same. The COVID-19 has resulted in schools shut all across the world. Globally, over 1.2 billion children are out of the classroom, in their home right now. But this crisis shall not stop the learning and studies. Schools, colleges, and institutes have started finding their way out of this. The lockdown has accelerated the adoption of digital technology. Before the pandemic, most universities never truly embraced online education, at least not strategically. There were online learning programs and software available but it didn’t make much difference as the traditional face to face learning had the power. But now the ‘online learning’ is going to be a thing.

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/351137

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June 11, 2020

OPINION: College in a pandemic is tough enough — without reliable broadband access, it’s nearly impossible

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 11:58 am

by TED MITCHELL and JAMIENNE STUDLEY, Hechinger Report

Sadly, though, the reality is that millions of Americans — in rural and urban areas alike, and including many underrepresented minorities — lack the reliable broadband connections needed to access postsecondary and K-12 education in a nation that remains in partial lockdown. This longstanding digital divide for learners of all ages has morphed into a divide that is keeping these vulnerable students offline during a critical period. This means that students living in online “education deserts,” who already face significant barriers to success, are being locked out of the postsecondary education that is so important to so many individuals’ prospects for future prosperity and civic engagement.

https://hechingerreport.org/opinion-college-in-a-pandemic-is-tough-enough-without-reliable-broadband-access-its-nearly-impossible/

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An Interview with Curt Bonk, School of Education, Indiana University: Summer Training

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:34 am

Michael F. Shaughnessy, EducationViews

These times are complex, unusual, and highly difficult for anyone in the field of education. K-12 teachers, higher education instructors, corporate and military trainers, and all others involved in education woke up a few months ago to a new normal. Perhaps, when this occurred, some of them decided to get a job in other fields or take an early retirement. However, the vast majority of educators in North America and Europe were forced to switch gears in mid-March and to begin developing online curricula and pedagogical activities for courses that they were in the midst of teaching.

https://www.educationviews.org/an-interview-with-curt-bonk-school-of-education-indiana-university-summer-training/

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5 steps to get the internet to all Americans

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Tom Wheeler, Brookings Institute

Released in April, the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) 2020 Broadband Development Report identified approximately 18 million Americans—principally in rural areas—without access to any broadband network. Regardless of how it is funded, the solution to universal broadband in America is not to patch the old program, but to throw it out. The program now in place was designed for a telephone-oriented world, not the internet economy. Here are five lessons we learned that should apply to any program to provide universal broadband for all Americans.

https://www.brookings.edu/research/5-steps-to-get-the-internet-to-all-americans/

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Could Big Tech’s move to permanent remote work save the American heartland?

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:28 am

Mark Muro, Brookings Institution
Last week, Facebook announced that as many as half of its employees could permanently work from home in the coming years, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to upend traditional office routines. The push happening around remote work is as game-changing for the future of tech as the launch of the iPhone was in 2007. Facebook’s announcement, following a similar one from Twitter, may be as important for the nation’s traumatized economic geography as it will be for general office culture.  If delivered on, Facebook’s plan to allow employees to work outside of expensive, superstar cities really does seem like a watershed moment. Widespread remote work, especially in the tech sector, might very well prompt a degree of geographic healing.

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/the-avenue/2020/05/26/could-big-techs-move-to-permanent-remote-work-save-the-american-heartland/

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June 10, 2020

Coronavirus’ Impact on College: Nearly Half of Undecided High School Seniors Considering Online Degree or Gap Year

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

Mike Brown, lendedu

LendEDU surveyed 1,000 current high school seniors and college students and found that 30% of committed high school seniors will consider not enrolling or deferring their admission if learning stays online in the Fall. While 52% of current college students believe the pandemic will extend the time it takes them to graduate. Now more than ever, students and their parents are questioning the worth of taking out all those federal and private student loans to cover the high cost of college when getting a degree online is much cheaper.

https://lendedu.com/blog/coronavirus-impact-on-college/

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Cal State’s Online Fall

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Paul Fain, Inside Higher Ed
The California State University system announced on May 12 that its fall term would be mostly online. The system was the first major U.S. university to make this move, and the announcement set off a flurry of news media coverage and debate among policy makers and college leaders. Tim White, Cal State’s chancellor, takes us inside this decision during the episode. In his discussion with Paul Fain, host of The Key, and Lilah Burke, a reporter at Inside Higher Ed, White talks about how the system is trying to balance its two top goals of protecting the health and safety of more than 480,000 students and 50,000 employees while trying to maintain academic progress at 23 campuses.

https://insidehighered.com/audio/2020/05/26/ep-8-cal-state%E2%80%99s-online-fall

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Half of presidents aim to restart classes in-person this fall, survey finds

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

Jeremy Bauer-Wolf, Education Dive

About half of college presidents say it’s “very likely” they will resume in-person classes for the coming term, according to a new American Council on Education (ACE) survey of 310 college leaders. In order to restart operations, about two-thirds of presidents with on-campus housing say they plan to set up a space to quarantine students. More than half of all respondents said they will require masks to be worn on campus. The results come as institutions mull whether current and projected public health conditions and access to testing supplies will enable them to begin the new academic year in person.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/half-of-presidents-aim-to-restart-classes-in-person-this-fall-survey-finds/578598/

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June 9, 2020

The Future of College Is Online, and It’s Cheaper

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

Hans Taparia, NY Times

Up until now, online education has been relegated to the equivalent of a hobby at most universities. With the pandemic, it has become a backup plan. But if universities embrace this moment strategically, online education could expand access exponentially and drop its cost by magnitudes — all while shoring up revenues for universities in a way that is more recession-proof, policy-proof and pandemic-proof.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/25/opinion/online-college-coronavirus.html

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Remote Learning Begs the Question: Must Lectures Be So Long?

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Jonathan Haber, EdSurge

For many, the recent leap to remote instruction felt rushed, chaotic and disorganized. Many things did not translate well online. Yet that discomfort also raises opportunities to question prevailing assumptions about how teaching and learning occurs. Let’s start with one of education’s most hallowed traditions: the lecture.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2020-05-25-remote-learning-begs-the-question-must-lectures-be-so-long

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Unbound – Reinventing Higher Education … new issue!

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

Richard J. Novak, Vice President for Continuing Studies and Distance Education, Rutgers

As we prepared this issue of Unbound, new article in tow, and as the higher education response to the pandemic evolved, it became apparent to all of us involved with the production that our PCO community was stressed by these changes and challenges, most of us working harder and more intensively to keep the train moving, and we didn’t have the time, energy or inclination to consume a large issue of Unbound in one sitting. It also became apparent that the pandemic was not a month-long crisis, but would be with us for some time. And so we shifted yet again, with a plan to provide a couple articles each month over a span of several months. It is our hope that this will be a more digestible format, timely and useful as the PCO community plays a continuing key role in institutional efforts to operate successfully in this new world. With this as the backdrop, I am delighted to bring to you the first installment of the new issue of Unbound, from its new home at Rutgers University, Division of Continuing Studies.

https://unbound.upcea.edu/online-2/from-the-editor-dr-richard-j-novak/

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June 8, 2020

The 5 Stages of Moving Online

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

Rhea Kelly, Campus Technology

From determining a remote learning strategy to planning for the new normal and enabling standards-based practices, these five phases describe the progress institutions are making toward excellence in teaching and learning online.  This is a time for institutions to pause and reflect. Were there any shortcuts taken that need to be undone? In addition, it’s important to survey faculty and students to determine what additional support might be needed. Many institutions may have skipped this stage, feeling the pressure to move forward with planning for the summer and fall terms, the panelists noted.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2020/05/13/the-5-stages-of-moving-online.aspx

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Hope Matters

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Mays Imad, Tomorrow’s Professor

More specifically, I am thinking about students who don’t have a safe environment at home — for whom residence halls and classrooms have served as a sanctuary, students who have found a community within college, or students who rely on college for their sustenance and security. In other words, most students. So how can we, teachers, be that “dancing clays” to balance our students’ mental and emotional loads, so that they may stumble just a little bit less? Reflecting on that experience and my questions, I came up with a short list of what I would’ve liked my teachers to do had I been a student who was sent home due to COVID-19.

https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1799

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Six graduate and professional Schools to remain online for fall

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am
Colleen Walsh, Harvard Gazette
Six Harvard graduate and professional Schools announced on Wednesday that they would continue teaching classes online at least through the fall semester, citing concerns about the ongoing health threat posed by the novel coronavirus pandemic and the possibility of new quarantines due to resurgence of the disease. Five of the Schools — the Graduate School of Design, Divinity School, Law School, T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Harvard Kennedy School — detailed their plans to extend their current practice of remote teaching through the rest of the calendar year in messages to their communities. The Harvard Graduate School of Education took the further step of announcing it would transition to a “fully online experience ” for the entire school year.

https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2020/06/several-of-harvards-schools-announce-fall-plans/

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June 7, 2020

How Americans see digital privacy issues amid the COVID-19 outbreak

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

BROOKE AUXIER, Pew Research

The ongoing coronavirus outbreak has brought privacy and surveillance concerns to the forefront – from hacked video conferencing sessions to proposed government tracking of people’s cellphones as a measure to limit and prevent the spread of the virus. Over the past year, Pew Research Center has surveyed Americans on their views related to privacy, personal data and digital surveillance.

https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/05/04/how-americans-see-digital-privacy-issues-amid-the-covid-19-outbreak/

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