Educational Technology

April 22, 2019

How Education Is Closing the Digital Divide

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Sara Friedman, THE Journal
Designing high-capacity and widely available networks is essential for meeting the digital learning goals, according to a new SETDA study. The report looks into how individual states are working to close the digital divide in education by creating dedicated networks for schools and funding grant programs. In order to provide personalized learning experiences for students to best prepare them for college and careers, and to compete in a global economy, all schools need access to reliable, high-speed broadband,” said SETDA’s incoming executive director, Candice Dodson.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2019/04/09/how-education-is-closing-the-digital-divide.aspx

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3 Trends to Watch in Ed Tech

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Dennis Pierce, THE Journal

Imagine if students left high school with a secure, permanent digital record of all their accomplishments — their academic achievement, extra-curricular experiences, community service and more — that followed them throughout college and into the workplace. Every new degree, certification, digital badge or other honor they earned throughout their lives would be added to this record like links in a chain, and these credentials would be tamper-proof to give employers some assurance that students actually earned them. This technology exists now, and it’s being used by a small but growing number of colleges and universities around the world to empower students by giving them ownership of their official record. K-12 education is likely to follow soon.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2019/04/10/3-trends-to-watch-in-ed-tech.aspx

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7 things you should know about enrollment management

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

EDUCAUSE

New approaches to enrollment management also reflect a growing expectation that enrollment managers contribute more directly and significantly to institutional efforts to fulfill academic missions, meet financial goals, sustain a diverse and successful student body, and increase access to education.  How does it work? For students, emerging models of enrollment management aim to provide a seamless experience for individuals who engage with the institution as a prospect, applicant, enrolled student, advisee, selector of an academic pathway, orientation participant, and completer of the first-year experience. In addition, enrollment management provides and aligns support to ensure learners’ ongoing academic progress through completion of a
credential or other academic goal.

https://library.educause.edu/resources/2019/3/7-things-you-should-know-about-enrollment-management

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April 21, 2019

Michael Crow at ASU GSV: Technologies and Policies We Need to Transform Education

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By IBL News

Michael M. Crow, President at Arizona State University (ASU), talked today on a keynote during the ASU GSV Conference in San Diego about the importance of connecting the workforce with lifelong learning opportunities. He elaborated on ASU’s model and mentioned the “technologies we need” to achieve a maximum impact in education. He listed those technologies in the following six categories. Personalized learning at scale will be one of the requirements.

https://iblnews.org/2019/04/09/michael-crow-at-asu-gsv-technologies-we-need-to-transform-education/

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In “Flipped” Classroom, Grad Students, Not Professor, Leading In-Class Instruction of Core Course

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By Miles Burton, U Chicago Maroon

The popular physical sciences class titled Global Warming: Understanding the Forecast has adopted a “flipped” class format this quarter, in which students receive primary instruction through videos on Coursera, an online education platform. Rather than traditional lecture-style classes with a faculty member, the format relies on graduate students for nearly all the in-person teaching. Geophysical sciences professor Dorian Abbot, who took over the course this year from professor David Archer, who told The Maroon he developed the flipped curriculum to improve attendance in a class that has historically been poorly-attended, and also to reduce cheating. He piloted the new format in fall quarter of 2018, and has adopted it in full this spring.

https://www.chicagomaroon.com/article/2019/4/10/flipped-classroom-grad-students/

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Inverse Blended Learning: How to Deal with MOOCs More Successfully

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

Martin Ebner & Sandra Schön, Drexel Virtually Inspired

We have been taking the approach of Inverse Blended Learning for 4 years now, we can proudly report that we have reduced the dropout rate dramatically. Even more, we can state that learners who visit the face-to-face offerings on a regularly basis are more likely to complete the course with success. It is great to see, that the arrangement of those face-to-face elements differs arbitrarily; weekly meetings in a very informal setting (cafes, public places) as well as in formal settings (higher educational seminars) and even online (webinars). These settings enable learners to not only discuss content but to see to each other’s problems, needs, questions and to complete tasks.

https://virtuallyinspired.org/inverse-blended-learning/

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April 20, 2019

Community Colleges And Tech Companies Are Co-Branding Credentials To Solve The Skills Gap

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Allison Dulin Salisbury, Forbes

There’s an important lesson there for higher education and it’s not just anecdote. Employers increasingly use applicant tracking systems that often screen for very specific skills. A resume for a digital marketing job, no matter how stellar, that doesn’t mention experience with platforms like Facebook Ad Manager or Hubspot may not even make it through the first automated round of screening. Same goes for an application for a data analyst that doesn’t mention a facility with Tableau or Microsoft Excel, a game developer without Unity, or a sales rep without Salesforce. In that sense, it’s not broad digital skills that matter, but rather skills tailored to one specific platform that is state-of-the-art in an applicant’s chosen field.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/allisondulinsalisbury/2019/04/08/community-colleges-and-tech-companies-are-co-branding-credentials-to-solve-the-skills-gap/#1094cf6949b5

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Aligning the Regulatory Environment with the 21st Century Realities

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:31 am

Robert Hansen,  Kathleen Ives, Russ Poulin; EvoLLLution
Despite changing student demographics and technological advancements, the American higher education regulatory infrastructure and related legislation continue to address only the needs of traditional postsecondary students. In this interview, leaders from three associations serving providers of non-traditional higher education—Robert Hansen from UPCEA, Kathleen Ives from OLC and Russ Poulin from WCET—discuss some of the critical reforms needed for federal legislation to better fit the 21st-century model of higher education.

Aligning the Regulatory Environment with the 21st Century Realities

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OPMs Are Losing the Battle for Hearts and Minds

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:28 am

Edward J. Maloney and Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

Rather than passing along the savings of online education to students — as Carey argues that online means “no buildings to maintain, no lawns to mow, no juice bars and [no] lazy rivers” — the tuition dollars are being instead converted to corporate profits for the OPMs.  The classic online program management business model is for the company to fund the costs of developing the online programs, recruiting the students and running the programs — and in exchange the OPM received a share of the tuition. This revenue share to the OPM is typically around 60 percent. The OPM market is growing, with Carey quoting Trace Urban from Tyton Partners saying that the market is likely to be worth $8 billion by 2020.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/blogs/technology-and-learning/opms-are-losing-battle-hearts-and-minds

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April 19, 2019

Ray Schroeder Discusses The Plight of Small Colleges in the Age of Online Learning and the Promise of AI in Personalized Learning

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Henry Kronk, IBL News

Professor Emeritus Ray Schroeder finds it difficult to stop working. As the Associate Vice Chancellor for Online Learning at the University of Illinois Springfield and the founding director of the National Council for Online Education at the University Professional and Continuing Education Association (UPCEA), he has a lot on his plate. IBL News recently got in touch with Professor Schroder to discuss his current work and a few trends in online learning. The interview occurred on the afternoon of March 12th, and the first topic of conversation had to be the admissions scandal that had come to light that morning.

Ray Schroeder: “Universities Have to Change To Meet Students’ Needs”

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Credential Clout: How Higher Education Can Prepare for an Evolving Job Market: a survey of US students and recruiters

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:37 am

Ellucian

This survey report outlines perceptions and prospects for careers among students and HR recruiters.  Among the results: GenZ students feel less prepared than prior generations and employers are seeking an array of soft skills led by communication, industry-specific skills, critical thinking and accountability.  Both students and employers agree that continuous learning is necessary.

https://www.ellucian.com/assets/en/white-paper/credential-clout-survey.pdf

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Will AI Save Journalism — or Kill It?

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:28 am

Meredith Broussard and Seth Lewis, Knowledge @ Wharton

In the past year, you have most likely read a story that was written by a bot. Whether it’s a sports article, an earnings report or a story about who won the last congressional race in your district, you may not have known it but an emotionless artificial intelligence perhaps moved you to cheers, jeers or tears. By 2025, a bot could be writing 90% of all news, according to Narrative Science, whose software Quill turns data into stories. Many of the largest and most reputable news outlets in the world are using or dabbling in AI — such as The Washington Post, The Associated Press, BBC, Reuters, Bloomberg, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Times and Sunday Times (U.K.), Japan’s national public broadcaster, NHK, and Finland’s STT.

https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/ai-in-journalism/

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April 18, 2019

VR, AR, AI Worldwide Perspectives

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by Ray Schroeder, Inside Higher Ed

There is much at stake in the development of AI. The “big nine” corporations are the linkages that ideally will bring cultures together and create a compass for development in this field. Action must be taken now to assure that the underlying assumptions are in the best interests of the learners. A first model for a governance framework for AI has been developed by the Personal Data Protection Commission of Singapore. The 27-page instrument is well worth reading to gain a better understanding of AI and its implications.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/blogs/online-trending-now/vr-ar-ai-worldwide-perspectives

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What the Tech? App of the Day: LinkedIn Learning

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WFMZ
If you’ve ever thought about changing careers, you might have also thought about going back to school.   It can be expensive and time-consuming, but thanks to online learning, you can take classes anytime you want.  LinkedIn Learning is an app that offers online training for jobs that are in demand now, like web and graphic design, sales and marketing. You can learn dozens of skills, including Google and Microsoft software. Learn how to create your own business plan or become a web developer.

http://www.wfmz.com/features/what-the-tech/what-the-tech-app-of-the-day-linkedin-learning/1066867860

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Pennsylvania School District Trims Budget with Cyber Charters

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:27 am

SARAH HOFIUS HALL, THE TIMES-TRIBUNE

Bills in the state House and Senate would allow districts with their own cyber programs to stop paying tuition to cyber charter schools. If a student decided to attend a cyber charter school, the family would be responsible for the tuition. Education Voters of Pennsylvania, a statewide public education advocacy organization, also called for reform. In a February report, the group found that by basing cyber school tuition on what it actually costs to educate a child virtually, districts statewide could save more than $250 million annually. In NEPA, savings could be as much as $24.5 million each year. In the 2017-18 school year, 2,799 students in Lackawanna, Luzerne, Monroe, Pike, Susquehanna, Wayne and Wyoming counties attended cyber charter schools.

https://www.govtech.com/education/Pennsylvania-School-District-Trims-Budget-with-Cyber-Charters.html

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April 17, 2019

Dexter elementary students learn through virtual reality

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By Lonnie Huhman, Sun Times News

Through the 5 C’s and virtual reality, Wylie Elementary School students have been working at creating their own “dream world” or “happy place.” All 500 or so of the third- and fourth-graders at the Dexter school spent about the last month or so planning and designing their projects by using creativity, critical thinking, collaboration, cooperation, communication and technology. This work culminated in the school organizing a VR Museum.

 

https://thesuntimesnews.com/dexter-elementary-students-learn-through-virtual-reality/

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Stepping Back from the Cliff: Facing New Realities of Changing Student Demographics

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Jim Shaeffer, The EvoLLLution
Most universities that plan to stick to the status quo and serve exclusively traditional learners are facing a cliff. CE divisions can help their institutions avoid a potential drop, but only if they’re empowered. Demographics of students enrolling at colleges and universities are evolving. And students’ expectations are evolving as well. As the numbers of 18-22 year olds fresh out of high school drop, the recruitment of non-traditional students is becoming more important than ever. In this interview, James Shaeffer discusses the role continuing education (CE) departments can play as drivers of innovation and reflects on how CE leaders can help their main campus colleagues embrace transformational change.

https://evolllution.com/managing-institution/higher_ed_business/stepping-back-from-the-cliff-facing-new-realities-of-changing-student-demographics/

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How adaptive learning changes the game

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:29 am

BY DENNIS PIERCE, eCampus News

Time and cost are two key barriers standing in the way of college completion, and that’s especially true for working adults going back to school. To eliminate these barriers and help registered nurses make faster progress toward earning a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree, the University of Memphis School of Health Studies is using adaptive learning technology and other practices to accelerate completion—reportedly saving participants more than $100,000 in collective tuition costs in a single year. “Students shouldn’t get bogged down with paying to learn things they already know,” says Richard Irwin, dean of UofM Global, the university’s online program. “Adaptive learning helps students move through the content at a more rapid pace.”

https://www.ecampusnews.com/2019/04/05/benefits-adaptive-learning/

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April 16, 2019

ASU opts for smaller classes, online tools and phasing out traditional classrooms

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Jennifer Auh, Fox 10 Phoenix

Arizona State University is currently phasing out the traditional classroom setting, at least for its math and science courses.  This new way of teaching is about providing a more interactive learning experience for students, and the new system has been so successful that it has been adopted by about 30 other universities across the country. Instead of going to class to listen to lectures, students in Professor Susan Holechak’s class do that online. Then, they go to class to work on problem-solving in small groups. “I feel the students are more engaged, because in a setting like this, they work in groups and able to go table by table, group by group. I can interact with them,” said Holechak, an instructor at ASU’s School of Life Sciences.

http://www.fox10phoenix.com/news/arizona-news/asu-phasing-out-traditional-classrooms-in-favor-of-new-approach-to-teaching

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Everyone learns their own way. So what’s best for you and your team?

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By Helen Lammers-Helps, Country Guide
We’re told there has never been a time in all of human history when things have changed at such a rapid pace. And this is especially true for agriculture. Nor are farmers just letting it happen. Instead, they’re embracing lifelong learning to prepare and to adapt, whether it’s learning new software programs, farm business management skills or any of a thousand different things. Fortunately, the internet has made it easier for those in rural and remote areas to access a wide array of new information from anywhere in the world, provided of course that you can put up with interruptions due to bandwidth and program speed.

https://www.country-guide.ca/guide-life/do-you-know-what-learning-styles-work-best-for-you-and-your-team/

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How to Use ‘Active Learning’ to Teach Critical Thinking in the Lab

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Tomorrow’s Professor

Graduates of the revised course attest to the value of its active-learning approach. Karl Wessendorf, BS ’16, who was in the first cohort of the new ChemEng 185, went to work in the biotech industry, where he came to appreciate how the course taught him to learn from failed experiments. “I had a much easier time transitioning from being a student to a working professional because I’d already made this leap,” Wessendorf said. Encouraged by student reactions, Sattely and Hwang have submitted a proposal to the university’s long-range planning process to create a “Catalyst of Teaching” at Stanford. “We’d like to spark a conversation about collaborative teaching,” Sattely said.

https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1707

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