Educational Technology

October 20, 2019

edX Announces Its Eleventh Degree: A Master’s in Electrical and Computer Engineering

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

IBL News

edX announced on September 30 the launch of its eleventh MOOC-based degree, reaffirming its role as an OPM (Online Program Manager) company. The new degree is top-ranked, as the #5 online graduate engineering program according to U.S. News & World Report. The Master’s in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Purdue University School of Electrical and Computer Engineering will cost $22,500, that is, 30 credits at $750 each. The current online master’s program in Purdue costs nearly $40,000. The lower price point was made possible in part due to the support from edX and the ability to offer courses at scale, according to Dimitrios Peroulis, school’s head.

https://iblnews.org/edx-announces-its-eleventh-online-degree-a-masters-in-electrical-and-computer-engineering-from-purdue/

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Community Colleges Need to Evolve as Students’ Needs Do

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:36 am

Pamela Eddy, Harvard Business Review

Central to the future of community colleges is the ability to build partnerships and collaborations that create efficiencies, while also addressing shared needs. Without this type of reinvention, community colleges run the risk of becoming obsolete. The strong history of community colleges as sites of innovation and nimbleness provides hope for a future in which these institutions will make an impact on communities and, most important, help change the lives of students and their families.

https://hbr.org/2019/09/community-colleges-need-to-evolve-as-students-needs-do

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California’s new online community college to open after months of planning

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Ashley A. Smith, EdSource

California’s newest two-year institution — the online-only Calbright College — opens on Tuesday and for the first time, and students will be able to register and enroll in programs that are intended to serve an entirely new adult and underemployed population. The new college was created to enroll so-called “stranded” Californians who are underemployed, working multiple part-time jobs or stuck in jobs that don’t pay living wages. The California Community Colleges system estimates about 8 million adults, between 25 and 34, fall into this category.

https://edsource.org/2019/californias-new-online-community-college-opens-after-months-of-planning/618006

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October 19, 2019

Colleges just got a lot more leeway to recruit students

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

By Hallie Busta, Education Dive
The National Association for College Admission Counseling’s (NACAC) Assembly voted to remove three provisions from its Code of Ethics and Professional Practices.  The vote during the association’s annual meeting last week was an effort by NACAC to get ahead of a two-year investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice’s antitrust division, which found several of the code’s measures limited competition and could lower costs for students if removed. They include banning incentives for early decision applicants and recruiting students who have committed to a college. Admissions experts say the changes will heighten competition for students, particularly among colleges struggling to fill their classes, and could make it harder to determine yields.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/colleges-just-got-a-lot-more-leeway-to-recruit-students/564016/

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How colleges adapting for today’s students

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:39 am

Register-Herald

Today’s college students bring a wide variety of needs and manage a constant juggle of responsibilities while pursuing a degree. According to the Department of Education, 74 percent of undergraduate students, described as the “new normal,” have at least one nontraditional characteristic such as being a first-generation student, having at least one dependent, or working either full or part time. Further, nearly half of students enrolled today are age 25 or older and are working to complete an unfinished degree, returning to advance their career or re-skill for a new opportunity.

https://www.register-herald.com/how-colleges-adapting-for-today-s-students/article_c1b4127e-6e5f-5fb4-9052-8e38cdc09ad2.html

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Experts Urge Congress to Consider Implications of AI Bias and Human-Robot Interactions

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:31 am

By BRANDI VINCENT SEPTEMBER, NextGov
It’s all part of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology’s work to support the development of a national artificial intelligence strategy.  As lawmakers consider the impact artificial intelligence will have on America’s workforce, experts across the government, industry and academia this week urged Congress to confront and prioritize issues around ethics, bias and the increasing interactions between humans and robots.

https://www.nextgov.com/emerging-tech/2019/09/experts-urge-congress-consider-implications-ai-bias-and-human-robot-interactions/160227/

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October 18, 2019

4 edutech innovations that will redefine learning habits in 2019

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:39 am

Nicholas Chew, e27

Technology is changing the way that we learn, information is also more abundant to the masses. Breakthroughs of new technology innovations such as A.I. and Blockchain are giving more opportunities for the Edutech sector to grow. Let’s dig deeper into how Edutech can boost learning in the digital world.

https://e27.co/4-edutech-innovations-that-will-redefine-learning-habits-in-2019-20190928/

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White House working group outlines future of universal transcripts

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

By Hallie Busta, Education Dive
In a new white paper, a workforce policy advisory board established by the Trump administration outlines the steps required to develop and successfully implement interoperable learning records (ILRs), which are compilations of peoples’ traditional and hands-on learning experiences. ILRs are already being piloted as a way to readily and securely share such information with educational institutions and employers by using vendor-agnostic technology that doesn’t require direct coordination or synchronization. The board sees broader potential for ILRs and suggests promoting that growth by creating a public list of pilot projects, developing a plan for implementing ILRs and bringing a basic ILR to market.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/white-house-working-group-outlines-future-of-universal-transcripts/563808/

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Major challenges facing our young people, graduates and students today

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

Patrick Ow, Thrive Global

Just-in-time continuous learning through flexible short courses (online virtual learning and offline bricks and mortar), and continuous on-the-job learning and training will become a norm as new skills are constantly created to keep up with advances in technology, evolving business models, and organizational restructure. The role and relevance of colleges and universities in preparing our future generations for work and employment must be scrutinized and debated. They must respond to the ever-changing need of the demand side of the work equation because graduates are using less than half of what they have learned in universities at work. The half-life of knowledge is also decreasing.

https://thriveglobal.com/stories/major-challenges-facing-our-young-people-graduates-and-students-today/

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October 17, 2019

Quantum Computing Is Poised to Change Everything

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By Ray Schroeder, Inside Higher Ed

It is truly rare that an advancement comes along that changes every aspect of society; quantum computing is poised to do just that in the 2020s.  The supremacy challenge earlier this summer was based on a problem given to both the Summit and the Google Quantum computers to prove that a set of numbers was truly random. That’s a rather esoteric test, but it demonstrates the magnitude of superiority of quantum computing: 200 seconds compared to 10,000 years.  Do you recall Moore’s law? That’s the axiom developed by Gordon Moore some two dozen years ago that the processing power of computers would double every 18 months to two years. Now, quantum computing has ushered in Hartmut Neven’s law. His law predicting growth in quantum computing power is one that is doubly exponential. That is two to an exponent of two to a second increasing exponent. Charted on a graph, that growth rate appears to become nearly vertical.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/blogs/online-trending-now/quantum-computing-poised-change-everything

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Digital learning transforms spread of higher education

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Munyaradzi Makoni, University World News

A new phase of promoting higher education which places importance on digital learning through massive open online courses (MOOCs) and online learning platforms has emerged in India, says the latest UNESCO report. MOOCs and other digital tools such as Ekalavya, which characterises self-learning environments, have transformed education, connecting students to global learning platforms and making learning more dynamic.

https://www.universityworldnews.com/post.php?story=20190926130129740

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AI equal with human experts in medical diagnosis, study finds

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

Nicola Davis, the Guardian

Research suggests AI able to interpret medical images using deep learning algorithm.  Writing in the Lancet Digital Health, Denniston, Liu and colleagues reported how they focused on research papers published since 2012 – a pivotal year for deep learning. One burgeoning application is the use of AI in interpreting medical images – a field that relies on deep learning, a sophisticated form of machine learning in which a series of labelled images are fed into algorithms that pick out features within them and learn how to classify similar images. Now researchers say they have conducted the first comprehensive review of published studies on the issue, and found humans and machines are on a par.

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/sep/24/ai-equal-with-human-experts-in-medical-diagnosis-study-finds

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October 16, 2019

In the Dark on Digital Learning

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By Lilah Burke, Inside Higher Ed

The results of a new survey offer presidents, provosts and CFOs a wake-up call about how they’re perceived by their colleagues in IT and digital learning. The reviews are less than glowing, with only about 40 percent of IT officials reporting that college leaders are “well informed” about digital learning and digital transformation. Ray Schroeder, associate vice chancellor for online learning at University of Illinois at Springfield (and an Inside Higher Ed columnist), said that although administrators at his university have been very engaged, the results of the survey were not surprising. Schroeder also said more residential students are choosing to take online classes for the scheduling freedom they can provide. As the trend doesn’t seem to be abating any time soon, Schroeder said it’s important for administrators to give IT officials a seat at the table, specifically on the dean’s council or president’s executive committee.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2019/10/16/administrators-are-neither-engaged-nor-knowledgeable-about

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Why Western Governors U thinks microcredentials are the path to degrees

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

Hallie Busta, Education Dive

Projections that the pool of traditional students will shrink, wariness of continued tuition increases and limited growth in state support for higher education are prompting institutions to shake things up. In many cases, that means making themselves available throughout learners’ lives as their education needs change. Doing so requires strengthening connections with local employers. Already, colleges and businesses are coming together to map the skills needed on the job to those offered in a certificate or degree, and some are even developing shared credentials.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/why-western-governors-u-thinks-microcredentials-are-the-path-to-degrees/563454/

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DYI Education Gaining Steam

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

Tamara Holmes, Yahoo

In fact, a new study suggests many people across the world are instead embracing a hodgepodge of do-it-yourself learning options.  To collect the data, Pearson conducted an online survey of 11,083 people between the ages of 16 to 70.  An overwhelming 81% of respondents said they believe learning will become more of a self-service affair as people get older. Among U.S. respondents, 87% said learning does not end after graduation. Education is also viewed as a way to pivot in one’s life, as 73% of U.S. respondents said they like to reinvent themselves by learning new skills, and 52% said they planned to pursue a second career, start a business or take classes after retirement.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/yourself-learning-gaining-stream-151554041.html

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The quality of online higher education must be assured

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

Nita Temmerman, University World News

Technology has brought great advantages to the online teaching-learning environment. It has changed how we do teaching and learning and opened up the world of learning and opportunity to those who would not have had such opportunity without it. However, for online education to be successful there has to be commitment and support by governments, institutions, academics and learners. An absolute necessity is providing quality education. That means well-resourced institutions, well-qualified and motivated staff, good and continuous quality assurance mechanisms and supportive leadership.

https://www.universityworldnews.com/post.php?story=20190917120217325

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October 15, 2019

The Incredible Shrinking Higher Ed Industry

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:42 am

Doug Lederman, Inside Higher Ed

Higher education enrollments have been falling for years, a well-documented outcome that can be attributed to some combination of a strong U.S. economy, changes in birth rates and, perhaps, growing doubts about the value of a college degree. Another decline is also unfolding — this one attributable to a mix of economic and political forces: the number of colleges and universities in the United States is at its lowest ebb since at least 1998. Data released by the U.S. Education Department’s National Center for Education Statistics Friday included statistics on a range of topics, including total head count of enrolled students through 2017-18 and the number of colleges and universities in the most recent academic year, 2018-19.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2019/10/14/higher-ed-shrinks-number-colleges-falls-lowest-point-two-decades

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AI is here — do we trust it?

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

Samara J Donald, Towards Data Science
More academically speaking, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) is a widely recognized one, which outlines considerations that factor into a users’ response to new technology, conscious or unconscious. These influencing factors include perceptions of usefulness, ease of use, and attitudes (preconceived notions) toward the technology. In essence, technology will be more readily accepted if it is stress-free, non-threatening, and conforms to our ideas shaped by societal context. More recently, trust as an influencer of technology adoption has become an important augmentation of TAM, particularly in the area of Internet of Things (IOT), online gaming, and online purchasing (1).

https://towardsdatascience.com/ai-is-here-should-we-trust-it-7774f5fffee

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AI, ethics and classrooms of the future

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

Raconteur

News that Pearson, the world’s largest textbook publisher, is phasing out print publications for higher education to adopt a resolutely digital-first policy may signal an eventual full stop for traditional book learning. But the wealth of technology coming on stream heralds an exciting new chapter for the future. In the view of Mike Buchanan, executive director of HMC, which represents independent school head teachers, digital education will unlock a less rigid approach to classroom-based learning, as well as enable closer collaboration with pupils’ families. Mr Buchanan predicts individual academic achievement will be, rather than by a plethora of exams, and argues that for teachers disenchanted by the current need to “teach to the test”, the freedom to pursue a more rounded curriculum will foster a new optimism.

https://www.raconteur.net/technology/future-classroom-digital-education

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October 14, 2019

60 Years of Higher Ed — Really?

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

Alina Tugend, NY Times

“The real driver of the 60-year curriculum is the job market and length of life,” said Huntington D. Lambert, the dean of the division of continuing education and university extension at Harvard University, who is a leader in the movement. Many continuing education programs already offer some of the elements. For example, the University of Washington Continuum College, which is the continuing education and professional development division of the University of Washington in Seattle, offers 99 certificate programs — most noncredit — as well as 111 graduate degree programs. An entire certificate course, which can take up to nine months part time to complete, runs between $3,600 and $4,500, said Rovy Branon, the college’s vice provost.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/10/education/learning/60-year-curriculum-higher-education.html

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How to secure IoT on campus

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:29 am

BY LYSA MYERS, eCampus News
What is a network administrator to do with this invasion of connected, and thus hackable, devices? If you’re paying attention to the development and proliferation of “smart devices,” it can seem like they’re everywhere: internet-connected thermostats, cars, vending machines, surveillance cameras, televisions, fitness devices, and even light bulbs. But the omnipresence of tiny, embedded computers in everyday devices also has a way of making them invisible to most people. What is a network administrator to do with this invasion of connected, and thus hackable, devices?

https://www.ecampusnews.com/2019/09/27/how-to-secure-iot-on-campus/

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