Archive for the ‘Educational Technology’ Category

10 Great Websites For Learning Programming

Wednesday, July 15th, 2015

by Thomas Claburn, Information Week

Whether you’re preparing for a new career or experimenting with magic powers, it’s worth knowing how to program. The best way to learn to program is through trial and error by working on projects that interest you. There’s no substitute for solving problems mostly on your own, and for seeking out help only when necessary. The DIY approach makes concepts real and memorable because you’ve implemented them, rather than reading material that may be forgotten. What follows are a few of what, in my opinion, are the best educational options out there to reach a moderate level of skill as a programmer. Feel free to tell us about others you’d recommend in the comments section below

http://www.informationweek.com/cloud/software-as-a-service/10-great-websites-for-learning-programming/d/d-id/1321154

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Girl’s petition helps change boys-only robotics class

Wednesday, July 15th, 2015

by AOL

An all-boy club for anything sounds weird to many of us nowadays, but that’s exactly what was going on … in a library of all places. The Timmins Public Library in Ontario denied letting girls into a summer session on robotics. That was until this Change.org petition by Cash Cayen went online and got over 30,000 supporters. Cash says the library wouldn’t let her join the session because it was only offered to boys. They did offer to put her on a waiting list. This all comes as the effort to get women and girls interested in the world of science and engineering continues to gain traction. And it seems to be working. A study by the National Science Foundation found girls are earning math and science credits at roughly the same rates as boys.

http://www.aol.com/article/2015/07/04/girls-petition-helps-change-boys-only-robotics-class/21204959/

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More Ohio students learning via online schools

Wednesday, July 15th, 2015

by Eric Schwartzberg, Journal News

More children than ever in Ohio are learning via online schools, a trend that local parents say is more the result of wanting more for their child than it is about their local school district. Increased popularity for this option has seen enrollments totals blossom from 44 such schools serving approximately 17,000 students in 2004 to 27 e-schools serving 39,044 students in the 2013-14 school year. That simultaneous decrease in the amount of schools and increase in enrollment has bolstered class ranks, leading to numerous Ohio e-learning institutions graduating their largest classes ever, including Ohio Virtual Academy, an accredited, full-time, online public community school that in June graduated 750 students, the largest graduating class in school history.

http://www.journal-news.com/news/news/more-ohio-students-learning-via-online-schools/nmq2c/

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MOOC Watch: Users flock to online grammar course from the University of Queensland

Tuesday, July 14th, 2015

by Tim Dodd, Financial Review

The University of Queensland (UQ) will again run its hugely popular massive open online course on English Grammar and Style, which 50,000 students enrolled in when it was first offered last year. The eight-week course will be run again starting on July 26 and promises to show students how to apply grammar and syntax to “produce coherent, economical, and compelling writing”. So far it has 10,000 enrolments, a number which is likely to rise sharply in the weeks up to the start date. So popular is the course that it is currently the highlighted MOOC on the edX website.

http://www.afr.com/technology/apps/education/mooc-watch-users-flock-to-online-grammar-course-from-the-university-of-queensland-20150703-gi1rav

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Skating and school: Local athlete excels on ice, and online classes

Tuesday, July 14th, 2015

by  Jackson Long, Courier-Gazette

For one local McKinney athlete, a lifelong passion for figure skating has transformed into exciting opportunities on the world stage. Emily Chan began figure skating just before she turned 4 years old, when she was drawn to the sport after attending a friend’s birthday party at an ice rink. “I loved it so much, my mom brought me back again and again and started taking lessons from my coaches,” Chan said. Now, having recently graduated from the Texas Online Preparatory School (TOPS) as valedictorian, competing in her first international competition and gearing up to attend the University of Texas at Dallas for biomedicine in the fall, Chan has her sights set on an ultimate goal.

http://starlocalmedia.com/mckinneycouriergazette/sports/skating-and-school-local-athlete-excels-on-ice-and-online/article_d074c6be-210a-11e5-a014-0b5a3cafe0c8.html

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As Virtual Virginia gears up for full high-school program, some concerns remain

Tuesday, July 14th, 2015

by Michael Bragg, Daily Progress

Christina Draper has a son in high school who does very well on his Standard of Learning tests, but his grades tell a different story. Her son, a student at Eastern View High School in Culpeper County, is smart, she said, but is easily distracted and can become a distraction to other students. “He has trouble sitting still in class, and because of that, he gets easily distracted and then he becomes a distraction to others, and then the teachers have to interrupt their lesson to get him to quiet down,” she said. Draper said her son has done homeschooling before and works better and stays on track in smaller settings. And now there’s a program Draper’s son has been accepted into that allows him to take high school classes in that smaller, independent setting and still be a public school student.

http://www.dailyprogress.com/news/education/as-virtual-virginia-gears-up-for-full-high-school-program/article_223c6708-2125-11e5-8b4b-b77f224731e7.html

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Economics & Humanities Podcasts to Propel Student Learning

Monday, July 13th, 2015

By Leah Levy, Edudemic

Several weeks ago, we took a look at a number of excellent podcasts just begging to be used in History and STEM classrooms. This week, we’re detailing a few more excellent podcasts to add to the classroom library, along with further ideas for how you can integrate each type. Our goal: to spread a love and joy for podcasts the worldwide, and to promote a lot of learning along the way!

http://www.edudemic.com/podcasts-propel-learning/

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Analytics Provides Better Online Learning

Monday, July 13th, 2015

by Thomas Claburn, Information Week

Millions of people have joined MOOCs — massive open online courses — but only a small fraction of these students end up earning certificates of completion. According to educational researcher Katy Jordan, the average completion rate for MOOCs is about 15%. To help understand why online learners fail to follow through — which matters to educators, online course designers, policymakers, students, and organizations paying for worker training — Kalyan Veeramachaneni, a research scientist at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and Sebastien Boyer, a graduate student in MIT’s Technology and Policy Program, have developed a technique that can help predict when students will drop an online learning course (an event they call “stopout”).

http://www.informationweek.com/big-data/big-data-analytics/analytics-provides-better-online-learning/d/d-id/1321180

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Report: Technology Purchases Driving up Back-to-School Budgets

Monday, July 13th, 2015

By Leila Meyer, THE Journal

Parents are spending more on school supplies this year, mostly for technology purchases, according to a new Consumer Pulse report from Rubicon Project. The survey, “Back-to-School Consumer Pulse Poll,” was conducted online in mid-June 2015 and collected responses from 1000 parents of K-12 and college students. It found that 56 percent of parents plan to spend more money on school supplies compared to last year, with K-12 parents planning to spend an average of $873 per child, and college parents planning to spend an average of $1,124 per student.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/07/07/report-technology-purchases-driving-up-back-to-school-shopping-budgets.aspx

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Telepresence Robots Attend Campus Tours, Classes and More at Oral Roberts U

Sunday, July 12th, 2015

By John K. Waters, Campus Technology

A growing number of colleges and universities have been experimenting with emerging virtual reality technologies, such as the Oculus Rift, and the virtual campus tour is emerging as a potential use case. But for the Information Technology Department at Oral Roberts University, the promise of the virtual tour pales in comparison with the potential of real-time, streaming, mobile telepresence tech. “Virtual reality presents too much of a learning curve,” said Michael Mathews, chief information officer at ORU. “The telepresence robot, on the other hand, is essentially just standard Web conferencing, but through an iPad mounted on a Segway. People just naturally get it. Students pick it up in minutes, and faculty don’t have to go to special training sessions or feel embarrassed about their level of expertise, because the students are the ones controlling it.”

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/07/01/telepresence-robots-attend-campus-tours-and-more-at-oral-roberts-u.aspx

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Harrington Park plans to start online math program during the summer

Sunday, July 12th, 2015

by MARC LIGHTDALE, North Jersey

The school district is putting together a new online mathematics program this summer to extend and supplement lessons from the academic year. Called mZone, it will use online resources to help 20 students work on math instruction beginning in July. “Parents are excited to see that this district never rests on its laurels and we’re looking to lead the way,” Superintendent Adam Fried said. The school district charges $200 to cover the costs for staffing and material.

http://www.northjersey.com/news/education/district-plans-to-start-online-math-program-1.1366890

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How Georgia students are taking summer school online

Sunday, July 12th, 2015

by Atlanta Journal Constitution

In Cobb County, students can take a “blended learning” program that combines online classes with direct teaching. Students can click through lessons at home and at Wheeler High School, which is staffed with teachers from 8 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Cobb spokeswoman Jennifer Gates said. For students making up a full class, that means 60 hours of online instruction and 60 hours with a live teacher at Wheeler. For students making up half a credit, it’s 30 hours of each.

http://www.ajc.com/news/news/local-education/how-georgia-students-are-taking-summer-school-onli/nmpzG/

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Top 5 Benefits of Online Learning Programs

Saturday, July 11th, 2015

by mattwriter, Say Campus Life

Online learning holds the future of higher education. Many university and college students find themselves with other obligations which include family and job commitments beyond that of getting a degree. It is therefore critical for them to take online classes and study on their own. The demand for online learning is also escalating due to many state institutions being unable to accommodate all the students that want to take classes in campus. Online learning programs offer many advantages which include….

http://www.saycampuslife.com/2015/07/01/top-5-benefits-of-online-learning-programs/

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NMC Horizon Report: Tech Solutions Must Support Shift to Deeper Learning Approaches

Saturday, July 11th, 2015

By David Raths, THE Journal

In a June 29 special session at the annual ISTE Conference in Philadelphia, the New Media Consortium (NMC) and the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) released the 6th annual NMC Horizon Report K-12 Edition, describing emerging technologies that are likely to have the most impact on teaching and learning. The key themes that emerged involve students moving from passive recipients of information to active participants and collaborators who need new types of support and opportunities. Previous Horizon reports zeroed in on technologies to watch, but this year NMC chose to pull back and focus on trends in teaching and learning and how technological developments could impact them. The panel that worked on the report was composed of 56 education and technology experts from 22 countries on six continents.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/06/29/nmc-horizon-report-tech-solutions-must-support-shift-to-deeper-learning-approaches.aspx

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Digital Portfolios: The Art of Reflection

Saturday, July 11th, 2015

by Beth Holland, Edutopia

Too often, conversations about digital portfolios center on the tools: how to save, share, and publish student work. Mastering the technical component of digital portfolios is critical, and students do need an opportunity to showcase their work to a broader audience. However, when we let the process of curate > reflect > publish serve as the sole focal point, digital portfolios become summative in nature and are viewed as an add-on at the end of a unit, project, or activity. For digital portfolios to be truly valuable to both teachers and students, they need to provide insight into not only what students created, but also how and why. If the ultimate goal is to develop students as learners, then they need an opportunity for making connections to content as well as the overarching learning objectives.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/digital-portfolios-art-of-reflection-beth-holland

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Jaw-Dropping Classroom 3D Printer Creations

Friday, July 10th, 2015

by Todd Finley, Edutopia

After the school day has ended at J.H. Rose High School, Rob Puckett and his two sons, Calder and Ryan, watch a nozzle in a white box extrude resin. It’s a scene reminiscent of 1976, when neighbors would crowd around a family’s microwave and stare at a hotdog cooking in under a minute. But unlike a microwave, Puckett’s classroom 3D printer aligns with the printing and graphic arts instructor’s 21st century maker ethos. Sitting in the middle of a studio that is stacked shoulder-high with boxes, Apple computers, spools of cheap plastic filament, and a variety of unrecognizable objects is Puckett’s Ultimaker 3D Printer — a box with no top or front panel. As it works, ambient music emanates from the printer — the sound that R2-D2 and a cheerful dolphin might make if they sang a duet five feet underwater.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/jaw-dropping-classroom-3d-printer-todd-finley

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What Wearable Tech Could Mean for the Classroom

Friday, July 10th, 2015

By Aiden Wolfe, Edudemic

Not too long ago, tablets and smartphones were largely viewed as educational scourges — mere distractions responsible for dulling minds and derailing productivity. Now, instead of being shunned completely, these devices are embraced as invaluable tools for meeting the complex, often hard to define needs of digital natives. Undoubtedly, wearable technology is destined to follow suit. The 2015 Horizon Report agrees, predicting the widespread use of wearables throughout the entire spectrum of modern education. Still, considering our senses are already overloaded with 1s and 0s, reluctance to embrace yet another digital medium is understandable. However, as this piece will explain, the potential benefits are simply too tremendous to ignore.

http://www.edudemic.com/wearable-tech-mean-classroom/

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Flipped learning is changing the face of special ed

Thursday, July 9th, 2015

By Dennis Pierce, eSchool News

At E.L. Haynes High School in Washington, D.C., 44 percent of students are English language learners, have special needs, or both. Yet all of the students in this urban charter school’s first graduating class have been accepted into college, said Principal Caroline Hill—and she attributed this success to a personalized, self-paced approach made possible by technology. E.L. Haynes has a one-to-one laptop program, and students also can bring their own devices to school. Using a flipped learning approach, teachers record their lessons and post them online, so students can watch the content over and over again until they understand—and class time is used to provide more personalized support.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/06/29/flipped-special-ed-618/

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Professors: New coding platform a must for higher-ed classrooms

Thursday, July 9th, 2015

By Ron Bethke, eCampus News

A new coding platform has a mission to elevate the state of coding education in higher-ed classrooms around the world; and one way it’s doing this is through professor buy-in. Bloomberg’s CodeCon platform, which features new weekly challenges this summer, is a browser-based, e-learning platform that enables cloud-hosted programming contests and seeks to reshape the way people improve their coding skills. Contests are based largely on efficiency and problem solving. Participants are asked to write optimized code that solves problems with real-world applications within a specified amount of time and memory constraints while accounting for all possible test cases.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/codecon-coding-education-777/

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Fiber Optics Cracked: Super-Fast, Cheap Internet En Route

Thursday, July 9th, 2015

by VICTOR JOHNSON, Immortal

Electrical engineers have made a major breakthrough in fiber optic communications which has the potential to lead to super-fast, cheap Internet. When sending data through fiber optic systems — such as those which serve as the backbone of the Internet, cable, wireless and landline networks — the distance data travels before it becomes indecipherable has proven to be a major setback when it comes to data transmission rates. But this hurdle has been overcome by photonics researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) who managed to send data a record-breaking 12,000 kilometers through fiber lines with standard amplifiers and no repeaters, Phys.org reported.

http://www.immortal.org/10582/fast-cheap-fiber-optic-internet/

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Spicing Up Student Learning With History and STEM Podcasts

Wednesday, July 8th, 2015

By Leah Levy, Edudemic

Podcasts have been around for a long time now, but they have only just begun to surge into mainstream popularity. That’s all thanks to a little podcast called Serial, a true crime program that reopened investigation into the murder of a high school student committed in 1999. With tens of millions of downloads, this podcast is officially the most popular of all time. To those of us who are longtime podcast fans, the potential of the medium to both captivate and set minds whirring is no surprise. There are so many great podcasts out there, that we found we couldn’t narrow them all down into one article. Let’s take a look at some of the greatest podcasts to adapt for classroom and at-home learning within the fields of History and STEM, and we’ll follow up with other subjects in coming weeks.

http://www.edudemic.com/learning-history-stem-podcasts/

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