Archive for the ‘Educational Technology’ Category

3 ways teachers can make learning more interactive

Saturday, March 14th, 2015

By Mike Broderick, eSchool News

Today’s students are a uniquely interactive group. Most of the 80 million Americans who are part of the millennial generation—a group that comprises the lion’s share of today’s student population—can’t remember a time when they didn’t have instant access to the internet. Educators who want to reach students who favor interactive communication know that integrating digital tools into their lesson plans can be an effective strategy, and many have incorporated technology tools into the classroom in one way or another. But to make a real difference, educators have to integrate technology in a meaningful way. So how can educators use technology in a more meaningful way? Here are three methods educators are successfully using to connect with a new generation of students in the classroom.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/03/05/ideas-interactive-726/

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Beyond Programming: The Power of Making Games

Saturday, March 14th, 2015

By Lisa Castaneda, Manrita Sidhu, THE Journal

Art and creative expression have an interesting way of weaving in and out of classrooms, offering students the opportunity to explore their own ideas and minds. Video games are no different, and while most of the discussion about their use in classrooms centers on play, we at foundry10 wanted to examine the value of making games. Through easily accessible programs such as Scratch and Gamemaker, students from early elementary up through college are creating games and learning while doing it.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/02/18/beyond-programming-the-power-of-making-games.aspx

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9 IT Best Practices for BYOD Districts

Saturday, March 14th, 2015

By Bridget McCrea, THE Journal

Districts with successful bring your own device programs share their key strategies for rolling out and managing student-owned devices in school. Allowing students to bring their own devices into the classroom is a relatively new concept to many U.S. school districts. BYOD can help personalize learning by letting students work on devices that they are very familiar with, but it also creates some key challenges for the IT professionals who have to balance the need for computing power with the resources provided by their districts. Here, a handful of district technology heads discuss their BYOD best practices and suggest how others might adopt them.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/02/10/9-it-best-practices-for-byod-districts.aspx

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10 Free Resources for Flipping Your Classroom

Friday, March 13th, 2015

By Amanda Ronan, Edudemic

Thanks to the folks over at Khan Academy, alternative modes of delivering classroom instruction are all the rage. We’ve got face to face models, labs, rotations, online-only, self-blend, and of course, flipped. While there are numerous ways to implement a flipped classroom, the basic components include some form of prerecorded lectures that are then followed by in-class work. Flipped classrooms are heralded for many reasons. For one thing, students can learn at their own pace when they’re watching lectures at home. Viewing recorded lessons allows students to rewind and watch content again, fast forward through previously learned material, and pause and reflect on new material. During traditional face-to-face class lectures, students spend so much time trying to keep up while taking notes they often miss crucial information.

http://www.edudemic.com/10-resources-for-flipped-classroom/

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Why MOOCs Are Great for Teacher Development

Friday, March 13th, 2015

By Kristen Hicks, Edudemic

For a while there, the word “MOOC” seemed to be on everyone’s tongue. For many educators who had reached their saturation points, MOOCs were the education world’s version of a song you heard every single time you turned on the radio and little by little grew to hate. In the background of all this oversaturation though, MOOCs have actually been embraced by a lot of great schools and professors. And the courses now available include a number of subjects aimed directly at teachers.

http://www.edudemic.com/5-moocs-educators-should-take-as-students/

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The Key to Solving the Teacher Labor Shortage: Online Learning

Friday, March 13th, 2015

by MyUSA

For more than 50 years, schools across the country have faced a decline in teacher quality and – despite an overall teacher surplus – chronic local and position-specific shortages. New research from the Clayton Christensen Institute for Disruptive Innovation shows that online learning could hold the key to providing the quality teacher labor supply that schools so desperately need. Solving the Nation’s Teacher Shortage: How Online Learning Can Fix the Broken Teacher Labor Market unpacks the compounding reasons behind teacher shortages to focus on the solution: online learning. By allowing educators to reach students from anywhere in the country, online learning creates a new degree of flexibility and productivity among teachers, while also making the field more attractive to new teachers.

http://www.mysanantonio.com/business/press-releases/article/The-Key-to-Solving-the-Teacher-Labor-Shortage-6116909.php

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Nine Ways to Encourage Faculty Experimentation with New Online Teaching Technologies

Thursday, March 12th, 2015

By Vickie Cook, Evolllution

Creating an environment where faculty are excited about innovation is critical to institutional growth. Teaching online can be demanding. Faculty teaching online often spend their breaks between semesters refining and rethinking their classes. Because online classes can be developed from anywhere, they are developed everywhere—not just on campus. As such, faculty support to explore new technologies may not be at the top of the to-do list. Once faculty have developed a few tried and true tools that meet their specific teaching needs of online course delivery, instructional designers may find these faculty reluctant to try out new teaching technologies. When I attend professional conferences and talk with faculty, the number one comment I hear is that adequate support for new technologies is not available on their campuses.

http://www.evolllution.com/media_resources/ways-encourage-faculty-experimentation-online-teaching-technologies/

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SDSU online classes among the most affordable, study says

Thursday, March 12th, 2015

By PAT BOWDEN Reporter, the Collegian

In a rapidly increasing field of online education, SDSU is recognized as a remarkably affordable university for degrees earned over the web – ranking in the top 11 schools out of 46 picked in the country – with 499 online courses offered for over 37,561 Internet credit hours. With around 7,500 students (over half the student body) taking at least one online class, some believe that the quality of education gets diluted when a class is converted to online. However, others argue otherwise.“You get the same education and the review process is very stringent, so you’re getting that same caliber of education as you would in an online course,” director of international affairs and outreach Lindsey Hamlin said. “At SDSU we’re looking at a healthy balance of both online and in-person [classes].”

http://www.sdsucollegian.com/news/article_b48d595c-c2b9-11e4-9352-ab41dfa4c694.html

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New Partnership Aims To Facilitate Online Course Creation for Teachers

Thursday, March 12th, 2015

By Michael Hart, THE Journal

A new partnership between two companies is designed to make it easier for teachers to create their own online courses, tutorials and homework assignments with interactive elements. Versal, a company that has offered an interactive publishing platform for online learning since its founding in 2013, and Wolfram Research, which creates customizable interactive elements such as timelines, diagrams and quizzes, will join forces in three ways:Educators will now be able to directly embed content based on Wolfram technology into courses they create using Versal software — without any coding required; Stephen Wolfram, who founded Wolfram Research in 1987, will join Versal’s board of directors; and simultaneously, new “gadgets,” the building blocks of Wolfram’s interactive learning elements, have been released, bringing the number available to educators to 48.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/03/04/new-partnership-aims-to-facilitate-online-course-creation-for-teachers.aspx

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EdX Launches Three New Courses from the Smithsonian Institution

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

by edX

EdX, the nonprofit online learning initiative, will offer three, new, free MOOCs from the Smithsonian Institution, the world’s largest museum and research complex, founded in 1846. The courses, for students and educators of all ages, will interest fans of superheroes, teachers and American history buffs alike. These first three Smithsonian edX courses, developed with the National Museum of American History, include: Objects That Define America; Rise of Superheroes and Their Impact on Pop Culture; and Teaching Historical Inquiry with Objects. All three courses are currently open for enrollment on edx.org.

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/edx-launches-three-new-courses-from-the-smithsonian-institution-300044597.html

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Yiwei Sun: Benefits from online courses far outweigh concerns

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

by Yiwei Sun, Daily Bruin

One of the heavily debated concerns about flipped courses is that online lectures would prevent real-life interaction between students and instructors. The concern is indeed valid, but classroom interaction is not an issue in all lecture settings. In fact, in a traditional large lecture hall setting with 200 students, the interaction between students and professors is minimal. Converting large general education courses into flipped courses won’t impair students’ learning at large because there are still office hours and physical discussion sessions in place for students to ask questions and discuss topics with each other. Ultimately, concerns about flipped courses are outweighed by their immense benefits, especially for non-native English speakers or students with disabilities. It’s UCLA’s responsibility to provide this alternative option to students in greater numbers and variety.

http://dailybruin.com/2015/03/04/yiwei-sun-benefits-from-online-courses-far-outweigh-concerns/

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3D Printing Heats Up on Campus

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

More than just a toy for engineers, 3D printing is beginning to move from experimental tech to multi-disciplinary learning tool. A young woman walks up to a vending machine, slides her student ID card, plugs in a USB drive, specifies the right file, chooses a color and starts the production process. When her object is printed, the machine shoves it into a tray and sends her a text message that it’s ready for pickup — practically like buying a Snickers bar. So goes another print job for DreamVendor 2, Virginia Tech’s latest experiment in open-access 3D printing.

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/02/26/3d-printing-heats-up-on-campus.aspx

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Tools for Teaching: Managing a Large Class Size

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

by Rebecca Alber, Edutopia

Do you have more students this year? Education budget cuts across the country are one cause of class-size increase in public schools. If you’ve found yourself with larger class sizes, or you’re a new teacher still grasping the often overwhelming experience of one of you and many of them, here are some helpful tips:

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/managing-large-class-size-rebecca-alber

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10 Free Resources for Flipping Your Classroom

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

By Amanda Ronan, Edudemic

Thanks to the folks over at Khan Academy, alternative modes of delivering classroom instruction are all the rage. We’ve got face to face models, labs, rotations, online-only, self-blend, and of course, flipped. While there are numerous ways to implement a flipped classroom, the basic components include some form of prerecorded lectures that are then followed by in-class work. Flipped classrooms are heralded for many reasons. For one thing, students can learn at their own pace when they’re watching lectures at home. Viewing recorded lessons allows students to rewind and watch content again, fast forward through previously learned material, and pause and reflect on new material. During traditional face-to-face class lectures, students spend so much time trying to keep up while taking notes they often miss crucial information.

http://www.edudemic.com/10-resources-for-flipped-classroom/

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Tech helps UNOH teach in different ways

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

by David Trinko, Civitas Media

“We have a variety of ages in classes,” said Lynn Lease, the director of the Center for Educational Excellence and a senior instructional designer at UNOH. “We have people in their 40s and 50s, and some straight out of high school. We have digital natives and digital novices mixed in together.” Lease said one of her favorite online tools is MoveNote, which allows you to record a video or audio to accompany a more traditional slide of a presentation, as well as marking it up. Another is VoiceThread, which encourages more engagement in classes. “It’s like a discussion forum on steroids,” Lease said. It’s audio, video, information, crowd participation.”

http://www.limaohio.com/news/news-news_education/151996209/Tech-helps-UNOH-teach-in-different-ways

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Virtual classroom lets students stay at home

Monday, March 9th, 2015

by Henrietta Cook, Sydney Morning Herald

In a Victorian first, students at Nossal High School had been given what to many must have seemed the ultimate option – to stay home. The school has begun letting students choose to participate in a virtual classroom from the comfort of their bedroom. Last year, the selective state school held two “digital delivery days” for year 9 to 12 students. The initial trial was successful and will be expanded to three days this year. The school’s e-learning director, Stuart Fankhauser, said it was designed to prepare students for university, where digital learning was entrenched. “I went to a conference a few years ago and the universities were indicating that it was taking quite a while for students to adapt to the way universities have really embraced the digital world. We wanted to prepare our students a little more effectively for that environment,” he said.

http://www.smh.com.au/victoria/virtual-classroom-lets-students-stay-at-home-20150228-13qiuw.html

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10 Things Students Should Know About Tech by Fifth Grade

Monday, March 9th, 2015

By Julie Davis, THE Journal

I wrote the following list for parents at my school to let them know what their kids need to know to be ready for upper school. This list is in no particular order and is definitely based on my humble opinion.  (below is a sample… to get the full list see the URL)

4) Device basics. All students should be able to do the following tasks on their device of choice:

Turn power on and off;

adjust volume up/down and mute;

select an appropriate WiFi network;

log in to a school e-mail account;

plug in headphones;

open Web browser to access the Internet;

take a picture;

take a video;

switch between front- and rear-facing cameras;

bookmark a website and add a shortcut to the home screen;

take a screenshot; and

access photos and videos.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/02/23/10-things-elementary-students-should-know-about-tech-by-fifth-grade.aspx

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Give Yourself a Raise: The Big Income Potential of Teaching Your Own Online Courses

Monday, March 9th, 2015

by Jeremy Sandow, Huffington Post

A couple of months ago, I stumbled upon an online course my girlfriend bought on how to optimize your YouTube videos. I wasn’t particularly interested in the topic, but I was intrigued when I found out that the producer of this course was a normal guy that happened to be making well in to the six figures annually selling it on a platform called Udemy. I saw the potential to grow my own reach; not only would I be able to tap into Udemy’s customer base of over 5 million students, but it was an opportunity to get myself in front of an audience that I may not have been able to reach otherwise. Not to mention, it would enable me to add an income stream to my business that was semi-passive; I wouldn’t have to sacrifice too much of my time to add a decent amount of income. Fast forward to now, and in just under two months, I’ve released three marketing related courses on Udemy, added a couple thousand dollars to my monthly income, and teach over 4,000 students; all with very little time commitment.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jeremy-sandow/give-yourself-a-raise-the_b_6765454.html

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How Teachers Will Change the Future of Tech

Sunday, March 8th, 2015

By Nicole Comforto, Edudemic

We often write about how technology can help teachers, but sometimes it’s useful to take a step back and consider how teachers influence technology. As with other subjects, the knowledge and enthusiasm that teachers show for technology in the classroom will have long-term effects on students, and the nation as a whole. A tech-savvy nation starts with tech-savvy teachers.

http://www.edudemic.com/teachers-will-change-the-future-of-tech/

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Journalism for Social Change

Sunday, March 8th, 2015

by UC Berkeley

On March 4th the University of California, Berkeley’s Goldman School of Public Policy, Berkeley’s MOOCLab and EdX and will launch the first ever Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) focused on using solution-based journalism to drive social change. The seven-week course, Journalism for Social Change (J4SC), will train students how to create solution-based journalism on issues affecting vulnerable children and youth. Through video-lectures, interactive games and writing exercises, they will report and produce journalism that elevates public discourse and policy. Exemplary stories will be published in The Chronicle of Social Change, an online news website dedicated to solution-based journalism on issues affecting children and youth. Several past students have proceeded to write longer features as well, including an 8,000-word article on child exploitation that ran in the East Bay Express.

https://gspp.berkeley.edu/news/news-center/press-release-journalism-for-social-change

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To Each His Own Education

Sunday, March 8th, 2015

by Jessica Gourdon, Translated by Nina Fink; EducPros.fr

According to Michelle Weise, Senior Research Fellow at the Clayton Christensen Institute, soon very few American students will receive a traditional four-year, on-campus college education. The majority of them will put together their own mix of trainings, internships, MOOCs and other alternative coursework. We met with Weise to discuss the digital revolution in education in preparation for EducPros’ East Coast Learning Expedition this April.

http://www.letudiant.fr/educpros/actualite/to-each-his-own-education.html

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