Archive for the ‘Educational Technology’ Category

3 predictors of strong digital learning

Monday, November 10th, 2014

By Laura Devaney, eSchool News

Overall, more students than ever before have access to digital learning opportunities, including online and blended learning, but state policies and other factors often limit digital learning’s availability. The 2014 edition of Keeping Pace with K-12 Digital Learning, researched and written by the Evergreen Education Group, examines the state of digital learning today and highlights the need for high-quality, actionable data on the digital learning tools and methods students use. “Digital learning is not really new anymore, [although] it continues to be innovative in all sorts of ways,” said John Watson, founder of the Evergreen Education Group and the report’s main author.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2014/11/04/pace-digital-learning-378/

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Open, but Undiscovered

Monday, November 10th, 2014

By Carl Straumsheim, Inside Higher Ed

When faculty members choose which textbooks to assign to their students, they look for trusted names and a track record of quality — not the price tag, a new survey suggests. While those priorities may stymie the growth and adoption of open educational resources (OER), the Babson Survey Research Group’s report on faculty members’ attitudes and opinions about those resources contains both “terrible” and “incredible” news for proponents of OER, depending on your interpretation. On one hand, faculty see open resources as just as good — if not better — than the products produced by traditional publishers. On the other, few faculty members have actually heard about OER. David Wiley, founder of the OER support provider Lumen Learning, said the disappointing top-level numbers overshadows the fact that many faculty members are satisfied with the quality of open content.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/11/04/open-educational-resources-perceived-high-quality-even-though-faculty-awareness-lags

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Blackmon: Education is vastly different from training

Monday, November 10th, 2014

By MYRA BLACKMON, Online Athens

Let’s get something straight. Education and training are not the same thing. Training is about skills to do something, such as a job or physical task. It implies reaction to certain stimuli or situations. Education is broader than that. It is the acquisition of general knowledge, the development of reasoning and judgment. Education is a much more nuanced, deeper concept than training. It requires understanding of theory, of the “why” of things. It requires much more than just being able to do a task, even a complex one. Jay Cross, who is credited with creating the term “e-learning,” explains it this way: “If your 16 year-old daughter told you that she was going to take a sex education course in high school, you might be pleased. What if she announced she was going to take sex training at school?”

http://onlineathens.com/opinion/2014-11-01/blackmon-education-vastly-different-training

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Making math personal

Sunday, November 9th, 2014

by Sarah Elms, Record-Eagle

Students at the Pathfinder School are adding and subtracting not only with paper and pencil — they’re clicking and typing, too. Teachers at the independent nonprofit school in Leelanau County are using an online learning tool called Khan Academy to help personalize math instruction in first through eighth grade. They piloted the program last year and decided to make it a permanent part of the school’s math curriculum, which already blends classroom instruction, textbooks and group problem-solving. “It’s had a profound impact on the engagement in mathematics,” said Rob Hansen, Pathfinder’s head of school. “It’s the new favorite subject around here.”

http://www.record-eagle.com/news/local_news/making-math-personal/article_1469ec5e-4d7e-54d4-a226-0522726c9ff5.html

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Putting web analytics data to use in higher education

Sunday, November 9th, 2014

by Karine Joly, University Business

With so much data now available, it is more challenging to choose what to present to decision-makers. In this context, benchmarking data can offer a welcomed reference frame to evaluate the overall performance of your school website. This is why new benchmarking reports, introduced in Google Analytics in September, are such a step forward for digital analytics. The three available reports let you compare the performance of your website with similar higher ed web properties.By selecting a geographic location and a range of average daily web sessions, you can access dashboards to compare your data on digital marketing channels driving traffic to your website, the location of your visitors and how they connected to your site. For a tutorial on accessing these benchmarking reports in Google Analytics, see my four-minute screencast.

http://www.universitybusiness.com/article/putting-web-analytics-data-use-higher-education

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Online learning at school ‘prepares students for university’

Sunday, November 9th, 2014

by CHRIS PARR Times Higher Ed

Some 78 per cent of those surveyed said they considered it important in university to be able to plan and coordinate group tasks using online tools such as calendars, scheduling tools and discussion applications, and 94 per cent said having the ability to find academic resources online was valuable. More than four out of five (84 per cent) said it was important to be able to set goals to help manage studying time for their university course, and those who had participated in online learning at school said that they had gained proficiency in a range of online learning tools that they were now using as part of their university working practice. The online learning experience had also helped them to develop confidence in using technology to source information and they were more likely to carry out their research online, the researchers found.

http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/news/online-learning-at-school-prepares-students-for-university/2016720.article

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How Should Schools Address Cyberbullying?

Saturday, November 8th, 2014

By MICHAEL GONCHAR, The New York Times

Questions about issues in the news for students 13 and older. Is cyberbullying a problem in your school? Have you or any of your friends been taunted, intimidated or called names online? Have you ever cyberbullied anyone? What responsibility do schools have to address online bullying, even if it occurs outside of school hours? How should schools tackle the issue?Room for Debate recently asked readers to weigh in on how schools should deal with online bullies outside of the classroom. Linked below are excerpts from some of the opinions:

http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/31/how-should-schools-address-cyberbullying/

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New tech empowers students to ignite own learning

Saturday, November 8th, 2014

by Todd Shields, Glenview Sun-Times

A writer and thinker on the topics of online learning and education, Will Richardson may sound like he favors doing away with school buildings. He doesn’t, but his point is this: self-learning is in the hands of kids while pursing creative interests. “We have access to so much information outside classrooms, and powerful Web technologies really amplifies it. Schools are the most important institutions in communities,” Richardson said Thursday at Glenbrook South High School in Glenview. “But part of learning is leaving the school and that’s the good thing. Students can create their own digital stories, games and animations.”

http://glenview.suntimes.com/2014/10/30/new-tech-empower-students-ignite-learning/

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New Paterson online program for 30 dropouts gets principal

Saturday, November 8th, 2014

BY JOE MALINCONICO, PATERSON PRESS

The city schools superintendent has appointed one of his highest-paid administrators to run a new program designed to help about 30 dropouts get their diplomas by doing their course work online. The superintendent, Donnie Evans, appointed Dorothy Douge as principal of what the district is calling its Extended Learning Opportunity School on Monday. Douge previously had been “principal on assignment” for two years and special assistant to the superintendent for the past year.

http://www.northjersey.com/towns/paterson/new-paterson-online-program-for-30-dropouts-gets-principal-1.1123886

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The Way We Learn Has Changed. Why Haven’t Our Schools?

Friday, November 7th, 2014

by Morning Start Advisor

“Contrary to popular belief, online learning isn’t a substitute for student-teacher interaction—it’s the catalyst for it,” says Horn, co-founder and executive director of Education at the Institute and co-author of Disrupting Class. “By offering a scalable way to bring personalization, access and cost control to K-12 schools, online learning enables teachers to spend more time on other activities like project-based and one-on-one learning.” “We can’t simply write a line item around funding tablets and think that will cover it,” adds Staker, senior research fellow at the Institute. “Technology is a critical piece of the puzzle, but understanding how to apply that technology is paramount. Blended is a comprehensive design manual for on-the-ground application.”

http://www.morningstar.com/advisor/t/98696679/the-way-we-learn-has-changed-why-haven-t-our-schools.htm

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University of Illinois to offer courses in Winter Session

Friday, November 7th, 2014

By Abigale Svoboda, Daily Illini

After longing for winter break, many students find themselves bored with their month-long vacation. Starting this winter, students can earn a few credits by taking newly-offered winter break classes. The University will launch its online winter session pilot program during the 2014-2015 winter break. Students can enroll in one of eight different courses and earn up to four credit hours in four weeks. The University has never offered winter break courses, despite offering a summer session both online and on campus.

http://www.dailyillini.com/news/article_6398c2aa-5e2a-11e4-9561-001a4bcf6878.html

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How to Succeed Taking Online Courses

Friday, November 7th, 2014

by Matthew C. Keegan, Say Campus Life

You’ve finally decided to take an online course, perhaps supplementing your regular on-campus courses with one that you can complete at your own pace. Online learning has been around for years and has provided many opportunities for people to get an education who might otherwise be shut out. Online courses may provide some flexibility for students, but there are some challenges that must be met too.

http://www.saycampuslife.com/2014/10/29/how-to-succeed-taking-online-courses/

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Penn Course Requires Students ‘Waste Time’ Online To Earn College Credit

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

by CBS

Most people waste hours on the internet anyway, but a new course at Penn is encouraging students to do it – for credit. Aptly-named “Wasting time on the Internet,” the real-life course will be offered by the Ivy League school’s English department during the upcoming spring 2015 semester.

And if you were wondering what students will, um, DO in the class – which is apparently a requirement for those majoring in creative writing – you don’t have to veer far from the course title to figure it out. “Students will be required to stare at the screen for three hours, only interacting through chat rooms, bots, social media and listservs.” Sounds…stimulating. Of course, Penn probably wouldn’t let students off the hook that easily. It seems there is some reading and discussion involved.

http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2014/10/28/penn-course-requires-students-waste-time-online-to-earn-college-credit/

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Online learning: No location is too unusual for students

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

by MATT SYMONDS, the Independent (Ireland)

Especially if you’re working on an oil rig off the coast of Abu Dhabi. This was the case for Ehimare Josiah, an assistant driller based in the United Arab Emirates, who spends alternate fortnights drilling into the ocean on board a rig. Now working towards an online MBA, he is one of many studying online in far-flung corners of the world. “I decided to develop myself in my area of specialisation to aid my fast progression,” Josiah says, “I needed an academic opportunity to help formalise my years of technical experience into a managerial role for operations.” Having applied to Aberdeen Business School (ABS) at Robert Gordon University, Josiah is an MBA oil and management student, studying online while offshore on rig Marawwah. But Debi Stephens’ reason for studying online is so she doesn’t have to leave her seven children at home. Stephens is a student at Robert J. Trulaske Sr College of Business at the University of Missouri on the executive MBA, three-quarters of which is studied online.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/further/online-learning-no-location-is-too-unusual-for-students-9823507.html

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Gov. Cuomo’s commission on ed-tech spending recommends more online learning

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

by Sarah Darville, Chalkbeat

The panel’s recommendations are generic, and include expanding the use of tablets and interactive whiteboards, providing schools with high-speed broadband, and increasing students’ access to “blended learning” programs that combine online and in-person teaching. The report also notes that districts will need to plan useful teacher training sessions and set clear goals if they decide to spend money on expensive devices. “Even the best-laid plans will run into hiccups along the way, and the most successful school districts will be the ones who are able to adjust their technology plans along the way,” the report says.

http://ny.chalkbeat.org/2014/10/27/gov-cuomos-commission-on-ed-tech-spending-recommends-more-online-learning/

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Why hybrid can be better than fully online learning

Wednesday, November 5th, 2014

by Jane Roberts, eCampus News

Tradition-rich Christian Brothers University watched in alarm a decade ago as online, nonprofit colleges began chomping away at nighttime enrollment. “They all had online options. For many adults, it appeared to be more convenient or faster,” said Toni Ross, dean of the College of Adult Professional Studies. “It was attractive until they got into it and realized maybe they still needed the instructor’s support and having a peer group was important. We’ve seen a change in what adult students want from online.” CBU rolled out its solution in the spring, a 40-60 split between the traditional classroom, which requires students’ presence on campus, and the online realm. Instead of two night classes a week, they now attend one night, for two hours.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/hybrid-online-learning-387/

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Adaptive technologists develop online STEM course of the future

Wednesday, November 5th, 2014

By Ron Bethke, eCampus News

Using “the science of memory,” and recent advances in personalized learning, an adaptive courseware provider is developing a STEM course aimed at engaging and retaining at-risk students. A recent recipient of the the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Next Generation Courseware Challenge, Cerego says its future course, StatsPL, will allow for such personalization of STEM learning that the course could reach more than 1 million low-income students by 2018.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/cerego-personalized-courseware-918/

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Students test new ways of teaching and learning at Virginia Tech

Wednesday, November 5th, 2014

By Tonia Moxley, Roanoke Times

Computer Science professor Dennis Kafura teaches a pilot computational thinking course for students in various disciplines as student Nathan Sexton, right, looks on. Virginia Tech is changing its general education curriculum for the first time in years. After nearly four decades teaching computer science, Virginia Tech professor Dennis Kafura is not one to jump on every passing bandwagon touting change. “I’m not much for educational fads because I’ve seen them come and go,” Kafura said. But last year when he was teaching a junior level computer science class in the traditional way — lecture with slides and homework assignments — Kafura noticed the occasional student surfing Facebook. And attendance was sometimes low. An idea from 2010 came back to the professor, based on a more experimental course he had taught that used in-class exercises and minimized lectures.

http://www.roanoke.com/news/education/higher_education/virginia_tech/students-test-new-ways-of-teaching-and-learning-at-virginia/article_dca00832-1328-5e74-9ba5-c0bbf62fb0fb.html

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Creative Commons from a Student’s Perspective

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014

By Dylan Schreiner, Edudemic

As a student, I’d have to say that one of the most annoying tasks when writing an assignment, whether a blog, a report or an essay would have to be citing sources. It’s not like I don’t feel that authors deserve credit for their work or that I’m too lazy to cite something. It’s the fact that teachers request that information be cited in a certain way. Sadly however, the “way” continually changes and differs. Within this article, I hope to describe my challenges with citing my sources and also develop my thoughts, as a student and blogger, on not only the new “Creative Commons” style of citing images, but also where I believe citations need improvement.

http://www.edudemic.com/creative-commons-from-a-students-perspective/

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Education pathways: K-12 students find success in virtual school

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014

by the Democrat

According to the national report, “Keeping Pace with K-12 Online & Blended Learning,” in the 2012-13 school year, roughly 310,000 American students in kindergarten through 12th grades attended fully online public schools. Blending elements of brick and mortar schools, distance learning and homeschooling, online public schools deliver public education directly to students in their home via the Internet. Students work with certified teachers online while a parent oversees progress in the home – they even go on field trips and take part in after-school clubs and activities. Curriculum is aligned to state standards and students take required assessment tests. And as a public school, it’s free.

http://www.thedemocrat.com/71932/2368/onlinefeature/513462/education-pathways-k12-students-find-success-in-virtual-school

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Tips to help online degree-seekers balance family, fun and education during the holidays

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014

by NWTN Today

For anyone juggling parental duties, work and online learning, relaxing and enjoying the holidays can be a challenge. For working parents pursing an online education, constant motivation is a great first step in achieving your career goals. Here are some other best practices to keep in mind that will allow you to balance schoolwork, family and holiday preparations while still enjoying the most festive time of the year.

http://www.nwtntoday.com/47811/2220/onlinefeature/514564/tips-to-help-online-degreeseekers-balance-family-fun-and-education-during-the-holidays

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