Archive for the ‘Educational Technology’ Category

5 Ways to Use StumbleUpon in Education

Sunday, April 5th, 2015
By Siobhan Tumelty, Edudemic
Whether you’re a StumbleUpon aficionado or have yet to get to grips with this awesome content discovery site, keep reading, because it has the potential to be of real benefit in your classroom. Whilst StumbleUpon isn’t the content discovery powerhouse it was back in January 2011, it’s far from had its day. It’s a powerful, user-friendly, educational tool that can help you become inspired, plan lessons, and connect with your students in a way that’s significant to them. Fourth after Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter for social media referrals, StumbleUpon provides a more focused way of browsing the Internet for useful, relevant material than relying on the attention-vortex that is Google. Just tell it what your interests are, and voila, it serves up a healthy helping of websites, photos and videos.
http://www.edudemic.com/5-ways-teachers-can-use-stumbleupon/
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How To Use Google Voice Commands In Google Drive

Sunday, April 5th, 2015
By Aiden Wolfe, Edudemic
Since its inception, Google Drive has been a source of excitement for innovation-minded educators. However, as with any new teaching technology, you may find yourself thinking “it sounds intriguing, but will it really make a difference?” In regards to Drive features like audio feedback, the answer to that question is an unequivocal yes. Aside from offering convenience and helping spare teachers from endless amounts of typing, the addition of voice commenting brings with it profound benefits to the learning experience as a whole. Below, you’ll find five compelling reasons to give it a try, as well as a simple guide on how to get started.

http://www.edudemic.com/use-google-voice-commands-google-drive/

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The Changing Cost of Open Source

Saturday, April 4th, 2015

by Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

Rather than committing hours of staff time to develop software, Unizin’s founding member schools (including Indiana University and Colorado State) are committing dollars — $1.05 million each over the course of three years. If it sounds hefty, remember: That’s still a pittance compared to the cost of equivalent digital content services on the commercial market. Unizin is also partnering with commercial entities — “companies that support open standards and open access to content and to data,” said Qazi. That doesn’t necessarily equate to open source, he pointed out. For example, Unizin has locked into the use of Instructure Canvas, a learning management system available to the consortium members under a discount arrangement.

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/03/26/the-changing-cost-of-open-source.aspx

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7 Proven Strategies for Winning Ed Tech Grants

Saturday, April 4th, 2015

By John K. Waters, THE Journal

In this era of limited budgets, K-12 educators looking to add technology to their classrooms often have to find creative ways to pay for their projects. Fortunately, there has never been a wider range of ed tech funding sources. Joining the lineup of traditional federal, state and private foundation grants is a new generation of donor programs and contests. “Writing a grant” today can mean anything from stating your case in a Word document to producing a video or making a direct pitch on a Web site. Whatever the medium, it’s how you tell your story that sets you apart from the competition. Whether you’re writing a traditional grant, entering a contest or reaching out online to a potential benefactor, you’ll increase your chances of success by applying these seven strategies.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/03/26/7-proven-strategies-for-winning-ed-tech-grants.aspx

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New technologies gain traction at notable university libraries

Saturday, April 4th, 2015

by eCampus News

3D-labLibraries throughout the U.S. are implementing new technologies to adapt to the changing habits of the digital age by adding additional services such as wireless internet, e-readers, and tablets. Technology is also driving a different trend that is redefining the very role that libraries play. By offering access to 3D printing, libraries nationwide are turning into labs of experimentation and innovation for aspiring entrepreneurs, and to help advance creativity for everyone. To date, MakerBot® 3D Printers and Scanners are in an estimated 500 libraries across the U.S.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/business-news/innovation-center-3d-389/

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Code Studio, a free learning tool, allows Courtenay school to teach kids to code

Friday, April 3rd, 2015

by All Points West, CBC

An elementary school in Courtenay, B.C. is teaching kids computer programming code by using a free online learning tool. “I’d love to see every teacher doing it,” said Kyle Timms, the principal at Courtenay Elementary School. In 2013, U.K. schools made it mandatory to teach coding to children as young as 5 years old. The new course is an effort to update the country’s computer science curriculum and fill job skills gaps in the growing technology sector. Coding is not currently in the B.C. curriculum, but a new curriculum is in development.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/code-studio-a-free-learning-tool-allows-courtenay-school-to-teach-kids-to-code-1.3009591

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You Are the Essence of Learning, Not a School or University

Friday, April 3rd, 2015

by BIG THINK EDITORS

If you’re learning, you’re being taught, no matter who is doing the teaching or where the lesson is taking place (and conversely, if you’re not learning, you’re not being taught). That message reflects the mission of the Khan Academy, an online learning platform that offers free lessons to anyone, anywhere, in subjects ranging from algebra to art history. Created by Salman Khan after tutoring his cousins by telephone, the Khan Academy not only teaches academic subjects, but it also develops skills like grit and determination that are needed to take ownership of information. And this, says Khan, is what the essence of education is all about: “There’s this illusion that is created in our classical education system and even at university that someone is teaching it to you. Really they’re creating a context in which you need to pull information and own it yourself. … And when you think online, that becomes that much more important.”

http://bigthink.com/think-tank/you-are-the-essence-of-learning-not-a-school-or-university

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Free online class helps prepare Kentucky students for college and careers

Friday, April 3rd, 2015

by the Lane Report

A new free online program called Take the LEAD can help Kentucky parents and community members support middle and high school students in getting ready for college and a career. The program is on-demand, allowing participants to earn their Local Education Advocate Diploma on their own schedule. Developed by GEAR UP Kentucky specifically for at-risk and underserved families, Take the LEAD provides research-based coursework to help parents advise their children on their plans after high school.

http://www.lanereport.com/46396/2015/03/free-online-class-helps-prepare-students-for-college-and-careers/

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Leveraging Innovative Policy Options for Students

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

by Jamey Fitzpatrick, Huffington Post

Imagine being an eighth grade student living in a small rural Midwest community with a passion to become a marine biologist taking an online course in Oceanography from a school, college, university or private provider located in Maine with national experts. Imagine being a 12th grade student from a large urban school with a desire to study Gaelic culture and language with an educational institution in Ireland. These examples are not science fiction; the ability to personalize learning has never been easier and more cost effective.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/smart-parents/leveraging-innovative-pol_b_6957864.html

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Crunched by the Numbers: The Digital Skills Gap in the Workforce

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

by Burning Glass

In the middle-skill job market, the world is increasingly divided between the jobs that demand digital skills and the ones that don’t—and the ones that don’t are falling behind. Much of the debate over technology in the workforce has focused on sophisticated skills, such as writing code. But the more significant impact on the middle-skill job market is in the humbler world of everyday software: spreadsheets and word processing, programs for medical billing and running computerized drill presses. To a large extent, a job seeker without the ability to use this software won’t even get in the door.

http://www.burning-glass.com/research/digital-skills-gap/

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Freshman sues St. Louis Public Schools for telling him to take online classes after suspension

Thursday, April 2nd, 2015

By Elisa Crouch, St. Louis Today

A freshman at Roosevelt High School is suing St. Louis Public Schools after the district suspended him from the school’s Virtual Learning Center in October and directed him to take online courses from home. The lawsuit filed last week in St. Louis Circuit Court says the student is not getting meaningful education instruction because he cannot access those online courses. He does not have a computer and cannot afford one, the suit says. And the library nearest his home does not allow minors to use its computers during school hours.

http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/education/freshman-at-roosevelt-sues-city-schools-for-directive-to-take/article_5f77be59-4e40-5c14-9824-754f182c26ca.html

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Roll Them In: Why TV is Still Essential Classroom Technology

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

By Pamela DeLoatch

Many of the teachers who bring tech into the classroom use one of three tools. Smart TVs are similar to traditional televisions, but they can connect to the Internet, allowing streaming of programs, videos and apps. Apple TVs are devices that, when used with an iPad and a projector or television screen, can stream like a Smart TV, but also allow all of the information on the iPad to be mirrored or shown on the projector. Interactive whiteboards, while not technically TVs, when connected with a projector and laptop, are often used interchangeably with the high tech TVs, replacing traditional whiteboards and DVD players.

http://www.edudemic.com/5-ways-to-use-apple-tv-in-the-classroom/

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6 Ways College Students Can Better Prepare for a Career in Business

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

by Drew Hendricks, Online Learning Tips

While nobody should discount the value of a good education, the truth is that you’ll probably learn more outside of the classroom than anything. That’s not a knock on any institution of higher learning; they would likely reaffirm this idea. If anybody understands the importance of a well-rounded education, supplemented with hands-on opportunities, it’s the schools that offer these opportunities for learning. As a college student pursing a business degree in 2015 and beyond, it’s critical that you take advantage of available resources. Failing to do so will limit your career opportunities and potentially stunt your professional growth in the early years.

http://onlinelearningtips.com/tag/networking-with-peers/

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Michigan study provides detailed online learning data; shows student attributes and growth in online enrollments

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

by John Watson, Keeping Pace

The Michigan Virtual Learning Research Institute, which is a center at the Michigan Virtual University®, has recently released its latest Virtual Learning Effectiveness Report. The study reviews virtual learning in Michigan during school year 2013-14. The report provides summary information showing the number of virtual courses taken by students in Michigan: 76,122 K-12 students in Michigan took one or more virtual courses during school year 2013-14, an increase of about 38% over the prior year. Some of the growth appears to be a result of data collection changes for this report, but the researchers believe that most of the increase represents real growth. The total number of online course enrollments was 319,630, an increase of about 73% over the prior year. Most enrollments (68%) were from local school districts. Online charter schools accounted for 27%, and Michigan Virtual School accounted for 5%.

http://www.kpk12.com/blog/2015/03/michigan-study-provides-detailed-online-learning-data-shows-student-attributes-and-growth-in-online-enrollments/

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6 Ways Social Media Can Change Your Classroom

Tuesday, March 31st, 2015

By Amanda Ronan by Amanda Ronan, Edudemic

Remember when schools had policies outlawing cell phones in the classroom? Teachers used to tell students, “Keep it in your locker, in your backpack, in your car, or at home, just don’t bring it in here. Your phone is a distraction.” Yet here we are, a handful of years later handing out laptops and tablets to every student, holding Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) days, and encouraging students to engage in class work online in ways we never imagined tolerable, or even possible. Today, many forward-thinking teachers are embracing gadgets and social media as a way to connect with students, families, and other classrooms.

http://www.edudemic.com/twitter-college-lecture/

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Everything you never knew about using Google in the classroom

Tuesday, March 31st, 2015

By Stephen Noonoo, eSchool News

Did you know you can see all your copy/paste history in Chrome in a click? Bookmark all your browser tabs at once? Create choose your own adventures in Google Slides? More than half a dozen Google Certified Teachers recently descended on Palm Springs to share their favorite tips, tricks, add-ons, and extensions during a packed session at the Annual CUE 2015 conference. Each presenter shared a micro-presentation honing in on their top ways for teachers and students to make the most out of the Google ecosystem.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/03/24/google-classroom-978/

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Google Glass headset isn’t dead, says Eric Schmidt

Tuesday, March 31st, 2015

By Charlie Osborne, ZDNet

The Explorer program, a scheme which allowed interested parties to apply for a headset, ended abruptly in January. At the time, Google said the program was being closed so its developers could “focus on what’s coming next,” and there will be “future versions of Glass when they are ready.” The Google Glass project has now moved out of the Google X research lab, where the headset was first developed, and is now a stand-alone unit overseen by Tony Fadell, the leader of Google’s Nest connected devices and Internet of Things (IoT) division. Nest was acquired by Google last year for $3.2 billion.

http://www.zdnet.com/article/google-glass-headset-isnt-dead-says-schmidt/

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Digital literacy for folks with autism and other learning disabilities

Monday, March 30th, 2015

by MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Philadelphia Daily News

Michele McKeone, 33, of Fishtown, is founder and CEO of Autism Expressed, an online learning system that teaches digital literacy to students with autism and other learning disabilities. Autism Expressed won a $20,000 prize from Educational Services of America and was Geekadelphia Startup of the Year for 2013, when it launched publicly. It’s software-as-a-service, both B2C and B2B. Parents can subscribe and pay monthly, quarterly or yearly. Public and private schools and service providers that work with individuals with cognitive disabilities pay an annual license fee per student. For a parent it’s about $30 a month. For an organization it depends on the number of students.

http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20150323_Digital_literacy_for_folks_with_autism_and_other_learning_disabilities.html

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Online Learning Service Platzi Wants To Teach You Useful Tech Skills

Monday, March 30th, 2015

by Jon Russell, TechCrunch

A couple of things about online learning service Platzi immediately set it apart from the other companies in Y Combinator’s latest batch. First, it is from Latin America — Colombia to be precise. Second, it is profitable. That’s right, it’s already making money. Online learning is hardly a new concept, but two-year-old Platzi is taking a different approach that’s interesting for a couple of reasons. Rather than broadening the availability of the traditional education experience using the Internet, like most MOOC (massive open online course) services, it’s focused on developing tangible skills. They also include a stream of notes from students, which are later gathered together to provide an overview of each session.

http://techcrunch.com/2015/03/20/platzi/

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Free college classes available to students in grades 7-12 this fall if they notify a counselor by April 1

Monday, March 30th, 2015

By Karen Farkas, Northeast Ohio Media Group

The program enables students in grades 7-12 can earn college and high school credits at the same time by taking college courses at no charge from community colleges or universities. Students who obtain college credit at no cost have a better chance of completing college and graduating with less debt, research has shown. Under the program, a student can earn up to 30 credits in a school year and 120 credits overall. In most cases, students will travel to the institution for classes or take online courses. In some cases, courses will be taught in the school district. The cost of tuition, books and fees is covered at public institutions. There may be some costs for private colleges. School districts may have agreements with local colleges, but students can take courses from any college.

http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2015/03/free_college_classes_available.html

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Gamifying Learning in My Classroom

Sunday, March 29th, 2015

by Liz Kolb, Edutopia

Every week for 17 years, I’ve heard my students ask, “What do I need to do to get an A?” Historically, many have focused on their grade rather than on fundamental skills. My attempt to change this mindset started two years ago when I gamified learning in my classes. After researching gamification and its potential to help students master skills and processes, I used the 3DGameLab and then Gradecraft to develop and implement game-based learning. In each class, students could choose “quests” that, if completed successfully, earned them badges and experience points. Each open-source badge was developed using Badg.us so that students could take them into the digital universe (e.g. attach to resumes, ePortfolios, etc.) and — unlike grades on a transcript — document skills they’ve mastered.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/epic-fail-win-gamifying-learning-liz-kolb

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