Educational Technology

December 6, 2017

10 video games that teach

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

by Matthew Lynch, tech Edvocate

Video games used were originally used to entertain children, young adults, and even adults. The advent of more platforms paved the way to incorporate educational concepts in video games, injecting fun with the aid of technology in subjects that used to be taught conventionally in schools or at home. Kids do not have just to read books or watch documentaries about math, science, art, music or even sports; video games augment what was initially taught to them by engaging them in activities to apply what they have learned. Here are some video games from across different platforms that allow kids to learn while playing.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/10-video-games-teach/

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4 exciting trends that will define the 2018 education industry

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:29 am

BY RICKY YE, eSchool News

The most hopeful potential impact of 2018’s edtech landscape is the opportunity for nurturing skills that will help students succeed in the future of work. Considering how robots could replace 38 percent of jobs in the U.S. over the next 15 years, it’s absolutely vital that we’re arming today’s students, from as early as kindergarten-age, with the ability to succeed once they enter the workforce. Let’s examine four key trends that are expected to shape the education industry this coming year:

4 exciting trends that will define the 2018 education industry

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Why small colleges should take the plunge into online education

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:29 am

By Pat Donachie, Education Dive

Though the future does not look bright for small, private institutions — which have seen a growing trend of closures due to a decline in enrollment and revenue — they may be able to stay afloat by tapping into can online courses and avoid a ‘precarious’ reliance on residential students, writes Robert Ubell, the vice dean emeritus of online learning at NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering argues for EdSurge. While many small schools view online courses as impersonal with the lack of mentoring and close relationships between educators and students, it’s inevitable schools ignoring digital opportunities will end up falling behind, he writes — especially as that pool of student enrollees becomes increasingly nontraditional and flexible online programs become more in demand.  Understanding the shift may be daunting, Ubell suggests modest investments in the right staff, online designers and recruiters, as well as a forward-thinking innovator and digital advocate on campus who can support the idea of online learning. He also suggests partnerships with third-party online program managers to handle technicalities, as sometimes such companies also commit to handling much of the initial cost.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/why-small-colleges-should-take-the-plunge-into-online-education/511785/

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December 5, 2017

This is the smartest robotics company in the world (and soon to be one of the most important)

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

by Greg Nichols, ZDNet

Sarcos Robotics, a Salt Lake City-based robotics company, has three new products at market or debuting soon. One is a small robotic snake, useful for industrial tasks such as pipeline inspection or for first responders conducting search & rescue or tactical response operations. Another is a hulking two-armed tele-operated robot that can be used for heavy construction or in nuclear power plants. The third is an exoskeleton suit that allows workers to nimbly perform the functions of a forklift. The technology is cool and worthy of the recent spate of coverage. But the really impressive thing about Sarcos is that its executive team seems to have figured out something that’s eluded countless other robotics developers: A bomb-proof go-to-market strategy.

http://www.zdnet.com/article/this-is-the-smartest-robotics-company-in-the-world-and-soon-to-be-one-of-the-most-important/

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Why Blended (Learning), Why Now?

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

by Kathryn E. Linder, Tomorrow’s Professor

Over the past several decades, a wide range of technologies has emerged that are designed to assist in teaching and learning. Technology has changed every aspect of our lives, and the higher education classroom also feels that impact (Collins & Halverson, 2009). Distance education programs at institutions of higher education, which are often seen as a means to broaden enrollment and increase gross margins (e.g., see Parry, 2011), are continuing to grow (Allen & Seaman, 2014). Blended (also referred to as hybrid) courses, in which face-to-face interaction is combined with technology-enhanced or online activities to aid student learning, have also been posed as a possible solution to the question of how best to engage busy students in a cost-effective and learner-centered way. Major (2015) points out that, for some, blended is seen to be “the best of both worlds” (p. 82) because of the way it allows for both face-to-face interaction and online support structures. For many instructors across disciplines, a form of blended learning, termed flipped classrooms, has also gained popularity as a method to increase in-class active learning time by shifting delivery of content to the online environment.

https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1607

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A matter of trust: What are you doing with my data?

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

by Mike O’Brien, ClickZ

Tech giants like Amazon and Google know so much about us that they can come off as creepy, yet they’re at the top of consumers’ list of trusted brands. It comes down to value exchange and the perception that they’re using people’s data to improve their lives.  What sets the brands dominating digital transformation apart is their ability to make the most of their tech stacks while still making consumers feel like the brand cares about them, even if they never interact directly. According to communications agency Cohn & Wolfe’s 2017 Authentic Brand study, nobody does that better than Amazon. Surveying 15,000 people around the world, Cohn & Wolfe found that 91% of them are willing to reward a brand they consider authentic through purchases and recommendations. Tech brands dominated, with Apple, Microsoft, Google and Paypal rounding out the top five.

https://www.clickz.com/matter-trust-data/203284/

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December 4, 2017

Creating a Space for Digital Media Innovation

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:40 am

by Meg Lloyd, Campus Technology

Rochester Institute of Technology’s MAGIC Spell Studios explores the intersection of digital media, film, games and entrepreneurship. The facility breaks down silos between traditional fields such as arts, engineering and computing, and provides a commercial studio for all students, faculty and staff.  Project lead Christopher Egert, MAGIC Spell Studios CTO and an associate professor at RIT’s School of Interactive Games & Media, explained, “The studio serves as a way to help students, faculty, industry partners and the community at large move ideas from prototype through commercial production, while at the same time working to support the educational goals, creativity and entrepreneurial potential of each student.”

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/11/28/creating-a-space-for-digital-media-innovation.aspx

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Will liberal arts institutions survive amid growing conservative skepticism of higher education?

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:34 am

by Autumn A. Arnett and Shalina Chatlani, Education Dive

Conservative skepticism around funding for liberal arts education is on the rise, as critics of higher education point out institutions for being “elitist” and “politically correct” centers of student protests that fail to provide skills actually needed for the job market, reports The Washington Post.  With studies showing a majority of Republicans and right-leaning citizens believe colleges and universities have a negative impact on the nation and lawmakers having already cut spending for higher education by 54% since 2008, stakeholders in the industry are now concerned the current congress could lead to further tightening of public funding.  Growing conservative skepticism on whether institutions are sufficiently addressing student ROI comes at the same times congress is considering potential reauthorization of Higher Education Act, which Republicans have already said ought to put the onus of responsibility on institutions to prove they are making college more affordable and worthwhile.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/will-liberal-arts-institutions-survive-amid-growing-conservative-skepticism/511716/

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MUSC program aims to tackle fitness of young people with autism and other disabilities

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

By Mary Katherine, Post and Courier

The group ranges in age from 14 to early 20s. They meet once a week for a variety of fitness classes, including swimming, yoga and spin classes. Instructors are trained to adapt the class. Experts help the teens and young adults with nutritional skills, too. Lisa Riddle, a mentor with Charleston’s Family Resource Center for Disabilities and Special Needs, said typical fitness classes might be daunting for people with autism. Uncomfortable bike seats, locker rooms, the smells and loud sounds of the gym — those things can be a sensory overload for people with these kinds of disabilities, experts said. “For a lot of kids on the spectrum, there aren’t as many opportunities to access fitness,” Riddle said.

https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/teaching-and-learning/teaching-adult-students-considerable-professional-expertise/

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December 3, 2017

How an Online Personalized Preschool Experiment Could Change the Way Rural America Does Early Education

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:39 am

by the 74 million

Upstart launched in Utah in 2009 as a low-cost option to expand preschool in a state that didn’t have a state-funded program. Since then, it has been a particular boon for the state’s rural areas. About 30,000 Utah children have gone through the program over the past eight years, with about 14,150 participating this school year. It has also now spread to seven other states, where 700 early learners are enrolled. State and federal policymakers are increasingly recognizing the value of early education, especially in keeping the achievement gap more at bay for disadvantaged children before they enter kindergarten. Preschool programs teach younger children early literacy and math skills alongside essential social-emotional skills. About 1.5 million 3- and 4-year-olds were served in state-funded preschool programs in the 2015–16 school year, more than double the number enrolled in such programs in 2002, according to the National Institute for Early Education Research.

How an Online Personalized Preschool Experiment Could Change the Way Rural America Does Early Education

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Scramble for dual-credit certification

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

By Ashley A. Smith
Some states and colleges are scrambling to offer incentives and develop programs that help dual-enrollment instructors meet a change in accreditation guidelines for teaching the increasingly popular courses. But concerns remain about whether colleges will have enough qualified dual-credit instructors by the time the accreditor’s deadline arrives.
The issue began about two years ago, when the Higher Learning Commission, the country’s largest regional accreditor, issued a policy clarification stating that high school teachers in dual-credit courses, along with all instructional college faculty, must have a master’s degree in the specialty they’re teaching, or they need at least 18 graduate-level credit hours within that specialty. Dual-credit or dual-enrollment courses allow high school students to take college courses and earn credits before graduation. The courses are frequently taught by high school teachers.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/11/27/institutions-grapple-accreditors-changes-dual-credit-instruction

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Indian school kids are learning to build robots with DIY kits and online courses

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

by Sushma UN, Quartz

SP Robotic Works (SPRW) is one of the several educational tech startups in India. These firms work to bridge a critical gap in conventional education, teaching technologies such as robotics, the internet of things (IoT), and virtual reality (VR). “The course is very one-to-one,” his mother Meenu told Quartz, describing the structured online classes that include videos and other learning tools. “Although it is online, it is as if (a teacher) is teaching you.” Although robotics is a broad concept including areas such as automation, embedded systems, mechanical engineering, IoT, etc, these ed-tech startups start with the basics. They design small kits containing breadboards, wires, sensors, and other such components, and get children to play with them

https://qz.com/1112876/indian-school-kids-are-learning-to-build-robots-with-diy-kits-and-online-courses/

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December 2, 2017

Mapping the emotional journey of teaching

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:38 am

by Emma Jones, KMEL Journal

Abstract: This paper will explore the use of Novakian concept mapping as a means of visualising and tracing the range of emotions inherent within any teaching experience. It will focus in particular on its use within higher education, where the presence of emotion has traditionally been disregarded or seemingly suppressed. The example of undergraduate teaching of the law degree will be used as an area where the role of emotion is particularly under-theorised. This paper will assess the effectiveness of concept mapping as a tool to enable academics to explicitly acknowledge, and reflect upon, the existence of emotion, both in terms of their individual teaching experiences, their collective teaching journey through a course or qualification and their students’ learning journey. It will also consider how use of this technique at a collective level could identify areas of pedagogic frailty, which may arise due to the misinterpreting, mishandling or suppression of emotion. The various opportunities and challenges arising from this application of concept mapping techniques will be discussed, drawing on a small, empirical pilot study, and leading to the conclusion that it has a useful and significant role to play within an emerging field of enquiry.

http://www.kmel-journal.org/ojs/index.php/online-publication/article/view/762

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IBM Raises the Bar with a 50-Qubit Quantum Computer

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

by Will Knight, MIT Technology Review

Researchers have built the most sophisticated quantum computer yet, signaling progress toward a powerful new way of processing information. IBM established a landmark in computing last month, announcing a quantum computer that handles 50 quantum bits, or qubits. The company is also making a 20-qubit system available through its cloud computing platform. IBM, Google, Intel, and a San Francisco startup called Rigetti are all currently racing to build useful quantum systems. These machines process information in a different way from traditional computers, using the counterintuitive nature of quantum physics. The announcement does not mean quantum computing is ready for common use.

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/609451/ibm-raises-the-bar-with-a-50-qubit-quantum-computer/

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Teacher ed programs turn to virtual reality

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:15 am

by Pat Donachie, Education Dive

Some future teachers are using augmented and virtual reality programs to gain classroom experience before they ever lead an actual class, according to University Business. The programs, increasingly in use at institutions throughout the country, offer future teachers the opportunity to fail and learn from mistakes in a “low-stakes” setting, according to Penn State Ed Tech Services Director Kyle Bowen. The virtual classroom students have individualized personalities and react to the instruction of the student in the VR space, and supporters say programs say they can be amended to accommodate for changes in student age, background and subject matter.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/teacher-ed-programs-turn-to-virtual-reality/511608/

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December 1, 2017

3 ways to reimagine learning spaces

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:38 am

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eSchool News

As schools depart from traditional instructional methods and environments, some education leaders are discovering how a combination of blended learning and reimagined physical learning spaces can lead to better student engagement and achievement. Redesigning physical learning spaces can lead to brain-friendly learning and encourage students to become more engaged. And when learning spaces are flexible, they provide more modern learning experiences and meet various needs, such as small-group collaboration, large-group instruction, and individual study or review.

https://www.eschoolnews.com/2017/11/27/3-ways-reimagine-learning-spaces/

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Still? Most teachers feel unprepared to use technology in the classroom

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eSchool News

An alarmingly large majority of U.S. teachers–78 percent–say they feel they haven’t received the training they need to teach with technology in the classroom, according to new research. The study from edtech and coding company SAM Labs, conducted online with independent research firm 72 Point, outlines the opportunities teachers see when it comes to technology in the classroom, as well as some of the biggest challenges the U.S. education system faces related to computer science and coding.

https://www.eschoolnews.com/2017/11/27/teachers-technology-classroom/

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Campuses show major shift in supporting student success

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News

Institutions are increasingly focused on supporting student success, with 73 percent of colleges and universities shifting their organizational structure to benefit students, according to a new study. The research study aims to demonstrate how higher education institutions are evolving to support student success and close the student-college digital divide. Unit4, a provider of higher-ed student management systems, conducted the research to ascertain how student success is driving investment in core systems.

https://www.ecampusnews.com/campus-administration/campuses-shift-student-success/

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November 30, 2017

Actualizing the Online Community College

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:37 am

by Kelvin Bentley, EDUCAUSE Review

Regardless of whether California develops and launches its first fully online community college, this topic should inspire all of us working in community colleges to find ways to enhance our approaches to offering online courses and programs. We should begin or continue to research and appropriately adopt good practices in accessibility, course development, course scheduling, faculty hiring and support, OER selection, and the use of analytics to help us offer online learning experiences of the highest quality. Such work is crucial to ensuring that the future of online learning at community colleges truly benefits the students and faculty we strive to serve.

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/10/actualizing-the-online-community-college

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America’s Digitalization Divide

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:35 am

by RICHARD FLORIDA, City Lab

We’ve long heard about America’s digital divide, but the nation is facing a parallel and deepening digitalization divide, too. According to a new Brookings Institution study, this digitalization divide is reflected in the increasingly uneven spread of high-paying digital jobs across the economy and workforce, by gender, race, and ethnicity, and across cities and metro areas. Digitalization has transformed just about everything we do—from the way we work to our entertainment choices, and how we communicate with one another. It’s not just knowledge workers, smart phones, and laptops we’re talking about. Our cars, televisions, and appliances are loaded with software. Smart thermostats like Nest and voice activated “assistants” such as Alexa permeate our homes.

https://www.citylab.com/equity/2017/11/americas-digitalization-divide/546080/

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Personalized Learning Should Start in Libraries

Filed under: Educational Technology — admin @ 12:30 am

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

Can a library be the perfect place for personalized learning? We believe the answer is yes. Libraries offer endless resources, space for learning, and individuals who are ready to assist students in the learning and research process. Sometimes when professors’ office hours do not line up with students’ schedules, we often forget, that librarians are here to help us too! That’s why we have libraries and librarians! Even if we think it is intimidating to approach a librarian, it should not be, because they are the experts in libraries! Not only are librarians available to assist us, but they are also available to teach us how to use the resources that the library has to offer.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/personalized-learning-start-libraries/

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