WWC Review of the Report “Interactive Online Learning on Campus: Testing MOOCs and Other Platforms in Hybrid Formats in the University System of Maryland”

July 18th, 2015

by US Dept of Education

This study measured the impact of using hybrid forms of interactive online learning in seven undergraduate courses across seven universities in the University System of Maryland. Interactive online learning can involve video lectures, opportunities for discussion and interaction with instructors and peers, and online assignments and exams. Hybrid forms of such courses combine online learning components with traditional face-to-face instruction. Of the 1,598 students enrolled in large introductory biology, statistics, precalculus, computer science, and communications courses, 778 were enrolled in sections that used the hybrid delivery format, and 820 were enrolled in the sections that used a traditional delivery format. The hybrid delivery format entailed one of two types of technology platforms: Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) supported by Coursera or materials from the Open Learning Initiative (OLI) developed by Carnegie Mellon University. Five of the hybrid courses had reduced face-to-face class time, and two courses used the online materials as supplements.

http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/SingleStudyReview.aspx?sid=20121

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8 Invaluable Online Classes for Entrepreneurs

July 18th, 2015

by Peter Daisyme, Entrepreneur

You have to continually expand your knowledge to succeed as an entrepreneur. Thankfully, educational institutions and technology are making continuing your education more convenient through online course. While there are thousands of informative and inspiring online courses you can take, here are classes you definitely need to enroll in if you want to be an entrepreneur.

http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/248055

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Fine-tuning this tech is the key to future blended learning success

July 18th, 2015

By Ron Bethke, eCampus News

Better use of educational video identified as paramount to improving the learning experience for students moving forward. The key to enhancing learning outcomes in higher education moving forward will stem from the optimal use of video, says a new whitepaper. The report, titled “Perfecting Blended Learning: Why Video Is The Missing Ingredient In Blended Learning” was released by Knowledgemotion to coincide with London’s Technology week and the EdTech Europe 2015 event. It includes extensive research and testimonials from educators and industry partners on how video can best (and should) be used both inside and outside of classrooms.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/video-blended-learning-476/

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More students getting college degrees in high school

July 17th, 2015

by Mitch LeClair, USA TODAY

More than one-third of Americans have earned a postsecondary degree. Few obtain one as a teenager. But this spring, hundreds — if not thousands — of U.S. students received associate degrees before high school commencements. Young adults with two diplomas are outliers in programs allowing high school students to earn college credits, which operate under various names and formats. They are growing in number at about 7% per year, according to the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships, or NACEP.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2015/07/07/more-students-getting-college-degrees-in-high-school/29846455/

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How higher education deals with security threats

July 17th, 2015

By Kacy Zurkus, CIO

Parents have plenty of things to worry about when they send their kids off to college: money, physical safety, their happiness, empty-nest syndrome, their future. Do they now have to worry about identity theft and data security, too? In a word, yes. Colleges and universities have been the target of phishing scams for years. And while they continue to get better at dealing with information security threats, the ways our institutions of higher learning defend themselves against cybercriminals are as myriad as the forms of cyberattacks they face.

http://www.cio.com/article/2945418/security-and-privacy/how-higher-education-deals-with-security-threats.html

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For Students, Textbooks Become Increasingly Optional Purchases

July 17th, 2015

By Jeffrey R. Young, Chronicle of Higher Ed

The average amount that college students spend on course materials appears to be declining. But not necessarily because textbooks are cheaper. A growing number of students, surveys show, simply skip buying required course materials. A survey of undergraduates on 23 campuses by the National Association of College Stores, expected to be released on Thursday, found that students spent an average of $563 on course materials during the 2014-15 academic year, compared with $638 the year before. The decrease is due in part to the rise of textbook-rental programs, which cost less, association officials note. But more students than in the past avoid acquiring course materials altogether, unless they see that the professor is making heavy use of the materials.

http://chronicle.com/article/For-Students-Textbooks-Become/231455/

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Four Ways Universities Make Money From MOOCs

July 16th, 2015

by Edsurge

A white paper from Extension Engine outlines four revenue models, based on a survey of 136 US colleges and universities. The most popular revenue source, used in 71 percent of the schools in the survey, comes from offering for-credit online courses that students pay for. Fifty-eight percent of schools compete for grants to support research on new online pedagogy and course delivery, but the report says “expenditures on these efforts are typically high and go largely unrecouped.” The less popular—but more “novel”—strategies, according to the report, involve the use of MOOCs as a recruiting tool for pre-matriculated students, and as a new way to maintain an active alumni community (and generate more donations).

https://www.edsurge.com/n/2015-07-07-four-ways-universities-make-money-from-online-courses

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Thousands enroll in ASU’s first free, public online class

July 16th, 2015

by Kaila White, The Republic

A new free, public online class from Arizona State University can up your skills in skepticism, “BS detection,” fact-checking your friends and not embarrassing yourself by sharing fake information on social media. “Media LIT: Overcoming Information Overload” is ASU’s first public, free online course. More than 3,000 people from 126 countries have enrolled in the massive open online course, or MOOC, which posted the first lesson Monday.

http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/tempe/2015/07/07/asu-online-class-free-mooc-journalism/29816569/

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Beyond Active Learning: Transformation of the Learning Space

July 16th, 2015

by Mark S. Valenti, EDUCAUSE Review

Concurrent with the development of the active learning space came a change in student demographics as the Millennial Generation arrived on campus. Often referred to as digital natives, millennials grew up with the Internet and hundreds of television channels; as a result, their expectations are completely different from those of previous generations of students. Millennials have influenced, and will continue to influence, higher education in a number of ways. As students, digital natives have forced higher education leaders to communicate and educate in new ways that meet millennials’ needs. For many decades, institutions offered education in a space of their choosing, on a schedule of their choosing, and in a style of their choosing. Millennials no longer accepted that model, demanding that education be offered in a space of their choosing, on a schedule of their choosing, and in a style of their choosing. Those spaces, schedules, and styles are often radically different from the offerings of traditional higher education.

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/beyond-active-learning-transformation-learning-space

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A University’s Success with Flipped Learning Began by Phasing Out Lectures

July 15th, 2015

by D. Frank Smith, Educational Technology

While some universities are wondering how to integrate online coursework into their classes, Adelaide University is actively phasing out lectures. The growth of online classes has been seen across nearly every higher education institution across the country. In a keynote session at EDUCAUSE in October 2014, Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen said online learning would fundamentally change the role of universities in the near future. Despite the changes on the horizon, the structure of most college courses has remained the same: stand-and-deliver instruction, also known as lectures, can be found at nearly every university in the country. But the University of Adelaide’s vice-chancellor Warren Bebbington told The Financial Review that “lecturers are obsolete.”

http://www.edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2015/07/universitys-success-flipped-learning-began-phasing-out-lectures

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10 Great Websites For Learning Programming

July 15th, 2015

by Thomas Claburn, Information Week

Whether you’re preparing for a new career or experimenting with magic powers, it’s worth knowing how to program. The best way to learn to program is through trial and error by working on projects that interest you. There’s no substitute for solving problems mostly on your own, and for seeking out help only when necessary. The DIY approach makes concepts real and memorable because you’ve implemented them, rather than reading material that may be forgotten. What follows are a few of what, in my opinion, are the best educational options out there to reach a moderate level of skill as a programmer. Feel free to tell us about others you’d recommend in the comments section below

http://www.informationweek.com/cloud/software-as-a-service/10-great-websites-for-learning-programming/d/d-id/1321154

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Survey: MOOCs Supplement Traditional Higher Ed

July 15th, 2015

By Joshua Bolkan, Campus Technology

A new survey of students enrolled in massive open online courses (MOOCs) suggests that the courses are supplementing traditional higher education forms and “democratizing learning.” Researchers from Duke University studied “13 free, open-access digital courses offered by Duke using the Coursera platform,” according to a news release, and found that the courses “are popular among youngsters, retirees and other non-traditional student populations.” The team analyzed pre-course surveys administered to all students who signed up for a fall 2014 MOOC offered by Duke, looking specifically at responses from 9,000 people younger than 18, older than 65 and those who reported that they had no access to higher education.

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/07/06/survey-moocs-supplement-traditional-higher-ed.aspx

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Telepresence Robots Attend Campus Tours, Classes and More at Oral Roberts U

July 14th, 2015

By John K. Waters, Campus Technology

A growing number of colleges and universities have been experimenting with emerging virtual reality technologies, such as the Oculus Rift, and the virtual campus tour is emerging as a potential use case. But for the Information Technology Department at Oral Roberts University, the promise of the virtual tour pales in comparison with the potential of real-time, streaming, mobile telepresence tech. “Virtual reality presents too much of a learning curve,” said Michael Mathews, chief information officer at ORU. “The telepresence robot, on the other hand, is essentially just standard Web conferencing, but through an iPad mounted on a Segway. People just naturally get it. Students pick it up in minutes, and faculty don’t have to go to special training sessions or feel embarrassed about their level of expertise, because the students are the ones controlling it.”

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/07/01/telepresence-robots-attend-campus-tours-and-more-at-oral-roberts-u.aspx

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UC Santa Cruz develops innovative online courses available to all UC students

July 14th, 2015

by Tim Stephens, UC Santa Cruz

UC Santa Cruz faculty venturing into the brave new world of online education are finding that a well-designed online course can be more accessible, and may even provide a better educational experience for students, than some traditionally taught courses. This is especially true for courses that large numbers of students are required to take for their majors, such as calculus. The online calculus courses taught by UC Santa Cruz math faculty Frank Bäuerle and Anthony Tromba (“Calculus for Science, Engineering, and Mathematics,” Math 19A & 19B) are now available to all UC students through the UC Online cross-campus enrollment system.

http://news.ucsc.edu/2015/07/online-courses.html

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MIT uses artificial intelligence to predict online learning drop outs

July 14th, 2015

By Larry Dignan, ZD Net

MIT said it has begun using artificial intelligence and big data techniques to better predict which students will drop out from open online courses. The news, which was detailed at a conference on artificial intelligence in education last week, is notable for a few reasons. First, online education is promising, but recent surveys have indicated that there are cultural issues at universities hampering online enrollment. The other issue is that some students simply aren’t disciplined enough for online learning. MIT’s techniques touch on that latter point a bit.

http://www.zdnet.com/article/mit-uses-artificial-intelligence-to-predict-online-learning-drop-outs/

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Who takes Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)? A HarvardX, MITx study

July 13th, 2015

by Journalist’s Resource

A 2015 report from a research consortium at Harvard University and MIT provides new data on the MOOC project that the two universities jointly launched in 2012. One of the largest surveys of MOOCs to date, it builds on a series of reports released in 2014 that focused on the joint project’s first year of operation. The new report, “HarvardX and MITx: Two Years of Open Online Courses,” includes data collected between July 2012 and September 2014. Researchers used newly available data and surveys to better understand who the participants are and how they take advantage of the free online courses offered by the two institutions. The findings are based on 68 courses across HarvardX and MITx, 1.7 million participants and 10 million hours of participation.

http://journalistsresource.org/studies/society/education/massive-open-online-courses-moocs-harvardx-mitx

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Top 5 Benefits of Online Learning Programs

July 13th, 2015

by mattwriter, Say Campus Life

Online learning holds the future of higher education. Many university and college students find themselves with other obligations which include family and job commitments beyond that of getting a degree. It is therefore critical for them to take online classes and study on their own. The demand for online learning is also escalating due to many state institutions being unable to accommodate all the students that want to take classes in campus. Online learning programs offer many advantages which include….

http://www.saycampuslife.com/2015/07/01/top-5-benefits-of-online-learning-programs/

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Are small, private online courses the future of higher education in America?

July 13th, 2015

by James Poulos, the Week

A wellspring of fresh faith has surged up around so-called SPOCs. Small and Private, not Massive and Open, SPOCs are boasting better completion rates and better vibes than their highly scalable predecessors. Garlock posits a developing consensus: “[B]y using technology to combine the centuries-old lessons of campus education with the best promises of massive learning, SPOCs may be the most relevant and promisingly disruptive experiments the MOOC boom has yet produced.” So long as the SPOC model is restricted to accredited universities, however, its impact is likely to be limited in at least one important way. Even if, as Garlock suggests, it “enables deep engagement through intense Socratic discussions” in a way that far surpasses what MOOCs can achieve, it’s still beholden to the formal and informal rules of academic officialdom — where shifting, often shadowy moral and bureaucratic strictures have made the pursuit of wisdom in the classroom prohibitively difficult and risky.

http://theweek.com/articles/563541/are-small-private-online-courses-future-higher-education-america

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NMC Horizon Report: Tech Solutions Must Support Shift to Deeper Learning Approaches

July 12th, 2015

By David Raths, THE Journal

In a June 29 special session at the annual ISTE Conference in Philadelphia, the New Media Consortium (NMC) and the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) released the 6th annual NMC Horizon Report K-12 Edition, describing emerging technologies that are likely to have the most impact on teaching and learning. The key themes that emerged involve students moving from passive recipients of information to active participants and collaborators who need new types of support and opportunities. Previous Horizon reports zeroed in on technologies to watch, but this year NMC chose to pull back and focus on trends in teaching and learning and how technological developments could impact them. The panel that worked on the report was composed of 56 education and technology experts from 22 countries on six continents.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/06/29/nmc-horizon-report-tech-solutions-must-support-shift-to-deeper-learning-approaches.aspx

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Digital Portfolios: The Art of Reflection

July 12th, 2015

by Beth Holland, Edutopia

Too often, conversations about digital portfolios center on the tools: how to save, share, and publish student work. Mastering the technical component of digital portfolios is critical, and students do need an opportunity to showcase their work to a broader audience. However, when we let the process of curate > reflect > publish serve as the sole focal point, digital portfolios become summative in nature and are viewed as an add-on at the end of a unit, project, or activity. For digital portfolios to be truly valuable to both teachers and students, they need to provide insight into not only what students created, but also how and why. If the ultimate goal is to develop students as learners, then they need an opportunity for making connections to content as well as the overarching learning objectives.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/digital-portfolios-art-of-reflection-beth-holland

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Year One With a 3D Printer: 17 Tips

July 12th, 2015

by Vickie Davis, Edutopia

The 3D printing industry is expected to exceed $21 billion by 2020. Classrooms are joining in. Kelly Hines’ fifth-grade classroom is redesigning a prosthetic hand. Can’t buy a drone? Soon, you may be able to print one. You can print robots, math manipulatives, and even parts for a 3D printer. (In fact, Bryan Byer’s science classroom in Michigan built their own 3D printer.) What will happen when we can 3D print things from door stoppers to wind turbines to (wait for it) wedding dresses? This past year, my students and I began our journey after I saw the FabLab at Kentucky Country Day School last summer.

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/year-one-with-3d-printer-vicki-davis

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