How to succeed as an online student

September 15th, 2016

Kelsie Clifton, UTPB Mesa Journal

School alone can be overwhelming but as an online student it can be even more challenging because we do not always have the motivation that other students might have in a traditional classroom. However, one thing I love about UTPB is that our online classes are designed to feel like we are a part of an actual classroom. We have group discussions, live chat and even group assignments just like a traditional classroom would. I have also noticed that more of my teachers have begun to record themselves by video or voice-overs for the chapter lecture which is also a huge help. It may take more effort but we as online students can succeed in our classes just as much as we would if we were physically there.

http://mesajournalnews.com/2972/news/how-to-succeed-as-an-online-student/

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Nonprofit receives nearly $1M to fund online Native language classes

September 14th, 2016

By Associated Press

An Alaska foundation is hoping to revitalize five Athabascan languages through online education with help from a $900,000 grant. The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reports that the Doyon Foundation recently announced the grant awarded by the nonprofit group Administration for Native Americans. The foundation will use the money to create 280 online lessons focusing on Holikachuk, Denaakke, Benhti Kenaga, Han and Dinjii Zhuh Kyaa languages. The courses will be available for educators and students throughout Alaska. The project is being worked on through a partnership with an organization called 7,000 Languages, which aims to preserve languages throughout the world.

http://www.ktva.com/nonprofit-receives-nearly-1m-to-fund-online-native-language-classes-417/

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Stackable Credentials Meet the Needs of Students and Society

September 14th, 2016

by Doug Shapiro, Evolllution

In the wake of the Great Recession, a number of “truths” higher education leaders took to be self-evident are disappearing. Students no longer fit into the traditional 18- 22-year-old demographic. Students no longer see their postsecondary education as a one-time affair. This second trend is particularly transformative, as learners are actually establishing their own non-conventional pathways to credentials within the rigid frameworks higher education institutions have in place. In this interview Doug Shapiro shares his thoughts on why these frameworks need to be rethought and reflects on the value of stackable credentials for students and for the economy.

http://evolllution.com/attracting-students/accessibility/stackable-credentials-meet-the-needs-of-students-and-society/

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Mars free-for-all: Monash course equips students for life on red planet

September 14th, 2016

by Birdie Smith, Sydney Morning Herald

Want to study how to live on Mars? This course will take just 12 hours of your time. And it’s free. That’s right, gratis. Among your teachers will be astronomer Jasmina Lazendic-Galloway and chemist Tina Overton. The idea of life life on Mars has long captivated the human imagination, but while getting to the red planet is relatively easy, surviving will be a real challenge. Your classroom will be of the virtual variety, with the four three-hour-sessions run by Monash University taking place online. The course will cover the basics of how to survive on the inhospitable red planet, which offers visitors no air, water or food.

http://www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-tech/monash-course-readies-students-for-life-on-red-planet-20160905-gr8toa.html

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Economist suggests Ed Dept credentialing as college cost cure

September 13th, 2016

By Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

Economist Carlo Salerno writes in the Huffington Post that allowing the U.S. Department of Education to grant degrees based upon the number of courses completed, regardless of transfers or the number of institutions, is a way to generate more value and decrease costs for students. Since most schools do not accept transfer credits universally to create more profit in taking duplicate courses and more requirements, Salerno argues that the DOE has the capacity to set rules on how many courses and which types qualify students for a professional credential. Salerno says that schools would cut costs to keep pace with the government’s credentialing arm, which could operate in the same way that it qualifies students for federal loans, and higher education accreditors.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/economist-suggests-ed-dept-credentialing-as-college-cost-cure/425756/

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Getting Real About Today’s College Students

September 13th, 2016

by Daniel Greenstein, Impatient Optimists

What are some of the most common misconceptions about today’s college students? Here are just a few: The typical college student is 18-24 years old and enrolls right out of high school. In fact, 40 percent of today’s college students are 25 or older. It is really important for colleges and universities to provide academic supports to help them brush up in areas where they might be weaker and technology-enabled advising that charts a steady and sure path to a credential. The typical college student is focusing full-time on their studies. The reality is that nearly two-thirds of all students are working while enrolled, a quarter of them full-time. Nearly 30 percent of students have children. The typical college student lives in a dorm on campus. Yes, 40 percent of today’s college students do live on campus, but that means 60 percent do not. Commuter students need access to programs and services before 9am and after 5pm, as well as online and blended courses that enable them to learn anytime, anywhere.

http://www.impatientoptimists.org/Posts/2016/09/Getting-Real-About-Todays-College-Students#.V86f9FsrLox

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Teaching and Learning Theories

September 13th, 2016

by Ann Gravells and Susan Simpson in Stanford University Tomorrow’s Teaching and Learning

There are many different theories regarding the way people learn. This section will very briefly explore some of them (in alphabetical order), which you might like to research further and try out with your own learners. However, don’t get too concerned thinking you must teach in a certain way because a theorist says so. What works with one group or individual learner might not work with another. You might find at first you are teaching the way you were taught at school, college or university. It might have suited you at the time, or it might have had a detrimental effect. Don’t be afraid to try something different and step out of your comfort zone. You will need to find out through experience what works and what doesn’t work with your learners.

https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1505

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Penn prof brings back controversial ‘Wasting Time on the Internet’ course

September 12th, 2016

By Michael Tanenbaum, Philly Voice

Ken Goldsmith, a distinguished poet and professor of English, will reprise his famed “Wasting Time on the Internet” course for the Fall 2016 Semester. The class, inspired by the radical legacy of the Situationist movement, debuted in 2014 after Goldsmith announced his experimental intentions in a piece for The New Yorker. For three hours a week, fifteen students met in a Wi-Fi connected room on condition that all of their communication take place online: chat rooms, bots, social media and listservs. Nothing is off limits: if it is on the Internet, it is fair play. Students watching three hours of porn can use it as the basis for compelling erotica; they can troll nefarious right-wing sites, scraping hate-filled language for spy thrillers; they can render celebrity Twitter feeds into epic Dadaist poetry; they can recast Facebook feeds as novellas; or they can simply hand in their browser history at the end of a session and present it as a memoir. You may be thinking, “Yeah, that’s kind of what I did in college, anyway,” but Goldsmith is pursuing a larger argument about the evolution of literature and the effects of its antecedents on digital mass culture.

http://www.phillyvoice.com/penn-prof-brings-back-controversial-wasting-time-internet-course/

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Massachusetts school district says laptops for students is a ‘social justice’ issue

September 12th, 2016

by DAVE HUBER, the College Fix

In a move that will cost $20 million, students in third through twelfth grade in the Springfield Public Schools (Massachusetts) will be given their own laptop to use during the school day. Superintendent Daniel Warwick tells MassLive that this is a “social justice” matter, an effort to bridge the so-called “digital divide” if you will: “This is an urban environment where many of our students are in high poverty rate situations, and with this technology they should be able to compete with any other student. We are providing technology to bring them into the 21st century and make them college and career ready.”

http://www.thecollegefix.com/post/28663/

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Digital Tattoo project aims to increase awareness of online privacy issues

September 12th, 2016

By Hussein Hatim, the Ubyssey

As technology advances, the world has become a more convenient and far less secretive place. Services like Facebook, Google and Instagram have created and replaced avenues of communication in a way that allows everyone to share more information with more people. UBC’s Digital Tattoo project aims to increase awareness of online security and privacy issues. Created with grant funding from UBC’s teaching and learning enhancement fund and from BCcampus, the project brings students and university community members together to discuss ways in which they can help students make thoughtful decisions about their online presence. The project also works with other universities including Thompson Rivers University, the University of Victoria and the University of Toronto.

http://ubyssey.ca/news/digital-tattoo-project/

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National Online Learning Day to be Celebrated September 15 #OnlineLearningDay

September 11th, 2016

by Business Wire

On Thursday, September 15, the online learning community and its supporters will celebrate the inaugural National Online Learning Day. The community of online learners is rapidly growing as student success expands beyond the bounds of traditional learning. National Online Learning Day celebrates the online learning community and showcases the accomplishments of its students and educators. Online learning is available to all learners—from preschool to high school to college and beyond—and provides students with the ultimate accessibility and personalization. By combining curriculum, technology and the Internet, students can study almost any subject—anywhere, anytime.

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160902005675/en/National-Online-Learning-Day-Celebrated-September-15

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Big Companies That Help Older Workers Finish a College Degree

September 11th, 2016

By Lisa Rabasca Roepe

Nearly 3 ½ million Americans age 50 or older have taken some college courses but haven’t earned a degree or certificate, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. Some big employers, such as Starbucks, JetBlue, Fiat/Chrysler and Pizza Hut are now helping them finish a college degree. These companies have launched programs allowing their employees of any age to earn a college degree online for little or no out-of-pocket costs. (The specifics vary for each program and are noted at the end of this article.) It’s a win/win for employees and employers. “When people are working on improving themselves, their productivity and performance improves,” says John Fox, director of dealer training, FCA Performance Institute, Fiat/Chrysler. Others offering college-completion programs say this benefit helps them with recruitment, retention and employee engagement.

http://www.nextavenue.org/ompanies-help-older-workers-finish-a-college-degree/

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A free online university course will teach you Mars survival skills

September 11th, 2016

By ARIEL BOGLE, Mashable

We could be living on Mars by the year 3000, so it’s time to get prepared. To help us earthlings ready ourselves for the journey, Monash University in Melbourne, Australia is offering a free online course focused on how to survive the red planet. Developed by astrophysicist Jasmina Lazendic-Galloway and chemistry professor Tina Overton, the course “How to Survive on Mars: The Science Behind Human Exploration of Mars” will run over four weeks, three hours per week with the first instalment beginning on Oct. 24. According to Lazendic-Galloway, the course emerged from she and Overton’s love of Andy Weir’s bestselling novel, The Martian, which was made into a 2015 film starring Matt Damon.

http://mashable.com/2016/09/01/university-mars-survival-course/#cof70vhIU8ql

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Predictive Analytics: Nudging, Shoving, and Smacking Behaviors in Higher Education

September 10th, 2016

by Kevin C. Desouza and Kendra L. Smith, EDUCAUSE Review

With predictive analytics, colleges and universities are able to “nudge” individuals toward making better decisions and exercising rational behavior to enhance their probabilities of success. With predictive analytics, colleges and universities are able to “nudge” individuals toward making better decisions and exercising rational behavior to enhance their probabilities of success. Like most other enterprises, academia is on the quest to leverage data to improve outputs and outcomes. At their core, academic enterprises are focused on advancing knowledge in society and transforming society through their outputs (e.g., the students they produce, the research they generate, and the interactions they cultivate with communities both local and global). Data management and analytics can significantly increase the odds that a higher education institution will deliver on its goals in an optimal manner.

http://er.educause.edu/articles/2016/8/predictive-analytics-nudging-shoving-and-smacking-behaviors-in-higher-education

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A VR program designed for education comes to Oculus Rift and HTC Vive

September 10th, 2016

by eSchool News

A new virtual reality program, designed in part for educators, is giving a whole new meaning to the virtual classroom. Compatible with VR platforms like Oculus Rift and HTC Vive, the new program, called Engage, lets up to 30 simultaneous users join and interact in an immersive, virtual meeting — which could be set in a museum, historical site, or the surface of Mars. The platform is new (and available as a free preview) so full functionality hasn’t been released, or even dreamed up, but so far educators can use it to create a custom avatar and then host live sessions or record presentations for download. Students will also be able to showcase artwork and photography in a gallery-like setting.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2016/08/31/this-immersive-vr-platform-was-designed-with-education-in-mind/

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How to Revamp Your Learning Spaces on the Cheap

September 10th, 2016

by David Weldon, Campus Technology

Often, the learning spaces that get the most attention are the big, flashy projects, complete with all the bells and whistles associated with cutting-edge technology-enhanced classrooms. But for many colleges and universities, those kinds of facilities are a dream, not a reality. With that in mind, Sutch and her colleague Mark Frydenberg, senior lecturer in computer information systems and director of the CIS Learning and Technology Sandbox at Bentley, presented the session “Spruce up Your Campus Learning Spaces without Breaking Your Budget” at the recent Campus Technology Conference in Boston, offering ideas on how campus technologists can outfit their learning centers “on the cheap.”

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/08/31/how-to-revamp-your-learning-spaces-on-the-cheap.aspx

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Report: Social Media a Top Cybersecurity Challenge in the Workplace

September 8th, 2016

By Rhea Kelly, THE Journal

Safe social media use is the top cybersecurity challenge for employees, according to the latest report from Wombat Security Technologies on security awareness issues in enterprise organizations. The 2016 Beyond the Phish Report evaluated two years of assessment data from Wombat’s Security Education Platform and surveyed hundreds of security professionals to find out how well end users are able to identify and manage security threats. The data came from a variety of sectors, including finance, technology, healthcare and education. Overall, 31 percent of end users missed assessment questions related to using social media safely in the workplace.After social media, the least understood cybersecurity topics across all industries were protecting and disposing of data securely (30 percent of questions missed); identifying phishing threats (28 percent of questions missed); protecting confidential information (27 percent of questions missed); and working safely outside the office (26 percent of questions missed).

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/09/01/social-media-a-top-cybersecurity-challenge-in-the-workplace.aspx

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How technology can make student onboarding faster and safer

September 8th, 2016

By Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

EdTech Magazine offers a view into the benefits of automatic digital onboarding, the process of establishing email and single-sign on access for students, faculty and staff that can make IT development faster, easier and more secure for campus stakeholders. Programs like OneLogin are examples of how schools create and manage digital identities for student and academic access points, helping schools like Texas A&M University and Brown University save time in data processing. Cloud-based technology is a major deterrent in protecting institutional information from hacking, as a recent survey revealed higher education is among the most vulnerable industries to illegal system access.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/how-technology-can-make-student-onboarding-faster-and-safer/425581/

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Higher ed leaders discuss vision behind workforce development

September 8th, 2016

By Jarrett Carter, Education Dive

The Department of Education recently debuted a pilot program to spur public and private partnerships benefiting workforce development, an unprecedented program which will pair colleges with for-profit companies to offer degrees and job training in select industries. We spoke with officials from three of those institutions, Tuskegee University President Brian Johnson, Purdue University Homeland Security Institute Director J. Eric Dietz and University of Wisconsin Extension Dean of Continuing Education, Outreach and E-Learning David Schejbal, who discussed the vision behind pairing academic programs with industrial partners, structuring programs to meet workforce demand, and the future of industrial development in their respective regions, and throughout the nation.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/higher-ed-leaders-discuss-vision-behind-workforce-development/425211/

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Ed-Tech Startup Coursera Launches Online Learning for Companies

September 7th, 2016

by Michal Lev-Ram, Fortune

Online learning platform Coursera is launching an enterprise offering for companies. It’s not what everyone expected when MOOCs first came on the scene, but maybe it’s the right move. On Wednesday morning, the company launched Coursera for Business, an enterprise platform for companies. According to CEO Rick Levin, a large percent of the site’s users are seeking content that can advance their career. Many of them are signing in from corporate email addresses. “With that in mind, we felt we could expand the horizon and the number of people we were reaching by going directly to companies,” Levin told me during a phone interview earlier this week. Coursera’s early customers include BNY Mellon, Boston Consulting Group, L’Oreal, and Axis Bank. Some use Coursera for their onboarding and training process. Others simply see it as a retention tool—after all, who doesn’t want to learn Python?

http://fortune.com/2016/08/31/ed-tech-startup-coursera-launches-online-learning-for-companies/

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5 ways to tell if your college programs will survive the future

September 7th, 2016

BY JOHN KATZMAN, eCampusNews

Online undergraduate and graduate college programs are growing at 15 percent a year, but will soon be a thing of the past. As will campus-based programs. Both will give way to an agile approach in which the technology and design of a program are indifferent to modality. Courses will be online, on-campus, or a blend of the two; marketing and recruiting will be integrated, as will student support and placement. Agile programs will enjoy a substantial cost, convenience, and quality advantage over online and campus-based programs. And while academia isn’t quite there yet, a review of changes in online higher ed and commerce over the past 15 years presents the compelling case that this level of integration between and among traditional and online offerings is inevitable.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/featured/featured-on-ecampus-news/college-programs-future/

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