4 Technologies Making News in 2017

February 9th, 2017

By Joshua Bolkan, Campus Technology

Another new year means another endless volley of prediction articles for the days ahead. While sidestepping proclamations that Crocs will find their home in high fashion, chocolate will become a breakfast staple and the University of Alabama will win the 2017 college playoffs — forecasts that are horrifying, delicious and already proven wrong, respectively — we’ve gathered four trends for technology leaders to keep their eyes on as the year progresses.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/01/19/4-technologies-making-news-in-2017.aspx

Share on Facebook

Phishing Attacks Down 10 Percent in 2016

February 9th, 2017
By Joshua Bolkan, THE Journal
Information security professionals are 10 percent less likely to report that their organization was the victim of a phishing attack in 2016 than in 2015, though that still means three-quarters of organizations were targeted and half of that same group said phishing attacks are on the rise, according to the latest State of the Phish report from Wombat Security Technologies. The report found a 64 percent increase in the number of organizations measuring the risk posed by end users. The company also reported that it had examined more simulated phishing e-mails than in the previous year and found that click rates are improving for many industries and for organizations with mature programs.
Share on Facebook

Brief interventions help online learners persist with coursework, Stanford research finds

February 9th, 2017

BY ALEX SHASHKEVICH, Stanford University News

A study, published in the Jan. 20 issue of Science, found that people in less-developed countries are completing MOOCs at a lower rate than those in the more developed parts of the world. But, the researchers found, brief psychological interventions that affirm class takers’ sense that they belong can help close the global achievement gap. “MOOCs have expanded access to education but this doesn’t guarantee equal opportunities for people around the world,” said René Kizilcec, the lead author of the study and a doctoral candidate in the Department of Communication. “Providing access to the Internet and courseware is not enough. People need to feel welcome in online-learning environments to reach their potential.”

http://news.stanford.edu/2017/01/19/brief-interventions-help-online-learners-persist-coursework-stanford-research-finds/

Share on Facebook

Using gamification in teacher professional development

February 8th, 2017

BY MATTHEW LYNCH, Tech Edvocate

If you asked a room of teacher if they would rather work, play, or participate in professional development, professional development would likely come in last. And while these tried-and-true methods for professional development aren’t going anywhere, there are methods for increasing engagement amongst the teachers in attendance. Gamification involves bringing elements traditionally associated with video games into the learning environment. Often, this involves concepts like points accrual, leveling, competition, and rewards being integrated into lessons that previously used another format. Additionally, most video games provide a safe space for failure, as players can respawn or open a previous save and try again. The purpose of gamification is to increase engagement by making the tasks both challenging and entertaining, but also giving participants a chance to try again if they don’t immediately succeed.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/using-gamification-in-teacher-professional-development/

Share on Facebook

Five Apps that Make Learning to Code Fun

February 8th, 2017

BY MATTHEW LYNCH, Tech Edvocate

One concept that has become really popular in the last 10 years is the idea that everyone should be able to code. Despite this, the need for programmers is growing much faster than the number of people learning to code. The majority of people either have tried and failed to learn or have just avoided learning code. There is this idea that coding is too complicated, that it is only for a person who thinks a certain way. The way that coding has been taught in the past does not help either; it is tough to learn when you can barely understand the jargon the teacher uses during class. The following are five free apps that will teach you to code without making it feel like a complete bore.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/five-apps-that-make-learning-to-code-fun/

Share on Facebook

Demand for Digital Courseware Is Higher Than Supply, Survey Says

February 8th, 2017

by Meghan Bogardus Cortez, EdTech

As universities clamor for digital materials and tools, the question of how to properly implement them remains. Now, more than ever, higher education stakeholders believe digital course materials are the key to solving systemwide problems. A recent Pearson Education survey called “Digital appetite vs. what’s on the table,” found that at least 84 percent of students, teachers and administrators said a shift to digital could help with challenges they face. About 82 percent of those surveyed also said that digital is the future, but only 56 percent said more than half of their institution’s courses are using some sort of digital courseware.

http://www.edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2017/01/demand-digital-courseware-higher-supply-survey-says

Share on Facebook

Educause Announces Top IT Issues, Trends and Tech Report for 2017

February 7th, 2017

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

Expanding on the preview of its annual ranking of IT issues for higher education released last fall, Educause announced its full report on the key issues, trends and technologies poised to impact higher ed in 2017.

The top 10 IT issues for 2017, reiterated in today’s report:

Information security;

Student success and completion;

Data-informed decision-making;

Strategic leadership;

Sustainable funding;

Data management and governance;

Higher education affordability;

Sustainable staffing;

Next-generation enterprise IT; and

Digital transformation of learning.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/01/18/educause-announces-top-it-issues-trends-and-tech-report-for-2017.aspx

Share on Facebook

Hey, Siri, Do My Homework!

February 7th, 2017

by Rimma Kats, eMarketer Daily

Digital assistants are becoming a part of everyday life, and many people—primarily teens and millennials—use them regularly. Accenture polled 25,996 internet users worldwide ages 14 and older and asked about usage voice-enabled digital assistants. For the most part, younger respondents use voice-enabled digital assistants more frequently than their older counterparts. For example, nearly a third of respondents ages 14 to 17 said they use them regularly. Respondents ages 18 to 34 are more interested in AI than older respondents, but just 23% of these older millennials use the technology regularly.

https://www.emarketer.com/Article/Hey-Siri-Do-Homework/1015057

Share on Facebook

United States of Knowledge

February 7th, 2017

by Coursera

Coursera has released a map of learning regions across the US based on relative popularity of online course topics on Coursera. Coursera analyzed data on online course enrollments among 5 million online learners in the United States to track the share of learners in each state interested in a variety of topics. While business and computer science are the most popular topics overall in most states, trends in relative interest between states tell a different story – one of a vibrant, diverse nation in which 12 distinct learning regions emerge. Check out the learning regions above, and be sure to scroll over your state to see the five most popular categories of online courses as well as what specific topics of interest make that state unique.

https://about.coursera.org/united-states-of-knowledge

Share on Facebook

Is Blockchain the Next Great Hope — or Hype?

February 6th, 2017

by Knowledge@Wharton

Cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin may have captured the public’s fancy – and also engendered a healthy dose of skepticism — but it is their underlying technology that is proving to be of practical benefit to organizations: the blockchain. These uses are merely the tip of the proverbial iceberg for a nascent technology whose development stage has been compared to the early years of the internet. “We’re very early in the game,” said Brad Bailey, research director of capital markets at Celent, at a recent Blockchain Opportunity Summit in New York. He likened the blockchain’s current status to the web of the early 1990s, heralding a coming wave of new ideas and uses. “This will impact the world.”

http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/blockchain-next-great-hope-hype/

Share on Facebook

Record shares of Americans now own smartphones, have home broadband

February 6th, 2017

BY AARON SMITH, Pew Research Center

Nearly nine-in-ten Americans today are online, up from about half in the early 2000s. Pew Research Center has chronicled this trend and others through more than 15 years of surveys on internet and technology use. On Thursday, we released a new set of fact sheets that will be updated as we collect new data and can serve as a one-stop shop for anyone looking for information on key trends in digital technology. To mark the occasion, here are four key trends illustrating the current technology landscape in the U.S.

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/01/12/evolution-of-technology/

Share on Facebook

Is personalized learning the future of education?

February 6th, 2017

BY MATTHEW LYNCH, the Tech Edvocate

A professional opinion, in any field, is still simply an opinion. Well researched, backed with experience, studies, and insight, but in the end, it is an opinion. Educational professionals have differing opinions about the definition and merit of personalized learning and therefore the role it will play in the future of education. Personalized learning is a goal for all educators, past, present and future. Providing personalized learning experiences which allow all students equal access to quality education according to their needs and interests is an ideal all educators embrace. The question, how? Will there be systems available to offer highly personalized education in the future? Let’s take a look at what the experts are saying.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/is-personalized-learning-the-future-of-education/

Share on Facebook

How big is the edtech marketplace?

February 5th, 2017

BY MATTHEW LYNCH, Tech Edvocate

Now nearly every young student has access to a computer or smartphone in some capacity. According to an article by Education World, the U.S. EdTech was an estimated $8.38 Billion in 2014, with no end in slowing down in sight. This is an industry that is growing at an accelerated rate to parallel the rate at which technology is now advancing. With the rate at which the tech market is growing, educators have to ask whether or not these ESo instead of the EdTech Marketplace providing students with useful tools for students, it can turn into a futile attempt for technology to help students engage with content in a meaningful and productive way. In effect, the EdTech Marketplace stands to lose by not giving their audience the tools they need.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/how-big-is-the-edtech-marketplace/

Share on Facebook

EdX Courses Take Less Time Than On-Campus Ones, Report Says

February 5th, 2017

By JULIA E. DEBENEDICTIS, CRIMSON

According to the report, described as “one of the largest surveys of MOOCs to date,” 2.4 million “unique users” around the world have participated in an edX class. Of those users, 159,000 have earned at least one certificate. The report details disparities between on-campus courses, or “residential courses,” and online ones—namely that students spend considerably more time on standard classroom-based courses. Most online certificate earners spend less than 50 hours completing a course, and one percent of certificate earners get certificates with “less than 23 minutes online,” according to the report. Researchers estimated that the average semester-long residential course takes approximately 168 hours, or 12 hours per week. “There still is a way in which this report reminds you how heterogenous [edX] still is,” Ho said. “The punchline is there’s no physical classroom like this in the world.”

http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2017/1/17/edX-report-shows-growth/

Share on Facebook

Harvard is putting a 13 module photography course online for free

February 5th, 2017

by Udi Tirosh, DIYPhotography

Four months ago, it was Stanford who made their photography course for free, and now comes Harvard’s turns. Harvard has an online learning platform – Alison – and their photography course has been uploaded in whole and accessible worldwide. There are 12 modules with an extra module as a bonus, so you can follow on your own pace. the course is estimated to take 10-15 hours for the average student. If you were wondering, here is the course description: Digital photography technology is continually changing, however, the principles behind good photography don’t. The online photo course gives you the opportunity to gain extensive knowledge and understanding of digital photography including topics such as exposure settings, how to read and use the histogram, how light affects a photograph, how the camera sensor and lenses work, and how to process a photograph using computer software.

http://www.diyphotography.net/harvard-putting-13-module-photography-course-online-free/

Share on Facebook

MU Extension Launching Innovative Online Program: Leadership Online For Today

February 4th, 2017

By University of Missouri Extension Report

University of Missouri Extension has developed an innovative online program with the focus on building better leaders. Leadership Online For Today is an interactive program that allows participants to improve communication skills, build relationships and networks, and develop a collaborative project to benefit a community or organization. The first program is set to begin the week of Feb. 6. MU faculty brainstormed leadership topics and those topics were then brought to millennials for feedback and suggestions. Extension leaders also talked with focus groups comprised of college students, Missouri 4-H members, Missouri FFA members and young professionals – all of who were in leadership positions.

http://www.boonvilledailynews.com/news/20170114/mu-extension-launching–innovative-online-program–leadership-online-for-today

Share on Facebook

How does gamification affect the learning process?

February 4th, 2017

BY MATTHEW LYNCH, Tech Edvocate

In the context of education, the trend of using game elements in non-game contexts, termed otherwise gamification, aims at increasing the engagement and motivation of students, capturing their interest to continue learning and influencing their classroom behavior. Although games are today often used in educational environments, the trend remains stigmatized and its use limited due for example to (1) inadequate access to technology, (2) lack of professional expertise in integrating new technologies, and (3) resistance to change. In order to change this, we need to understand the way gamification may facilitate learning systematically. Gamification in education may optimize the brain’s processing of new information. This may be facilitated by the general aspects of gamified lessons, with the audio-visual presentation, minimized bites of schematized information, short time lapses, and often repetitive patterns.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/how-does-gamification-affect-the-learning-process/

Share on Facebook

Online Tutoring Market to Grow 12.75% Between 2017-2021

February 4th, 2017

By Sri Ravipati, THE Journal

The annual rate of students who will enroll in online tutoring services worldwide is expected to double over the next few years. The global K-12 online tutoring market is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 12.75 percent from 2017-2021, up from a CAGR of about 6 percent from 2016-2020, according to a recent report from Technavio. The K–12 segment of the online tutoring market was valued at $63.57 billion in 2016 and is forecasted to be $120.67 billion by 2021. The London-based tech market research firm has identified the top three emerging marketing trends expected to impact the market between 2017 and 2021.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/01/12/online-tutoring-market-to-grow-12-percent-between-2017-2021.aspx

Share on Facebook

Twin Lakes offers “lovely balance” between online and classroom learning

February 3rd, 2017

By Andrew Philips, Orillia Packet

An Orillia high school is offering twin styles of learning. The innovative blended learning course at Twin Lakes Secondary School is a unique entry, featuring both online curriculum and face-to-face learning with a teacher in a computer lab. “This is a regular class that we have in a computer room,” explained Robyn LaChapelle, who teaches the Grade 10 civics and careers class. And while many teachers are already using various forms of online learning in their classes, this marks the first formal e-learning course offered at Twin Lakes. “We thought. ‘Why not have a trial run in Grade 10?’” LaChapelle said. “This provides more availability since every student learns differently.”

http://www.orilliapacket.com/2017/01/13/twin-lakes-offers-lovely-balance-between-online-and-classroom-learning

Share on Facebook

A new report tracks how data analytics programs are expanding at universities across the nation.

February 3rd, 2017

by eCampus News

Twenty percent of U.S. four-year institutions now offer analytics programs, while just 2 percent of two-year institutions offer such programs, according to new research from data company Tableau. The increase in programs comes from a push to expand analytics offerings to ensure more students are prepared to work with data in their careers. The report, The State of Data Education in 2016, notes that universities also are offering interdisciplinary education in analytics by embedding basic data literacy into other fields–a move that reflects data’s growing importance across all industries.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/big-data/data-analytics-advancing/

Share on Facebook

Lumina Foundation Gives Odds For Edtech Innovation Under Trump

February 3rd, 2017

by Bernadette Tansey, Xconomy

Jamie Merisotis, president and CEO of the Lumina Foundation, sees bipartisan interest in education initiatives that help U.S. students and adults prepare for success in the 21st century labor market. Toward that end, Indianapolis-based Lumina has been supporting non-traditional education providers such as online learning programs, alternative credentials like badges and certificates, and other measures to re-invent post-secondary education. One of the big themes of the new Republican administration and the Republican-dominated Congress is paring back government regulations, Merisotis (pictured above) says. And that could advance Lumina’s mission. “Less regulation could encourage more innovation,” he says. Merisotis is mindful, however, that the Trump administration isn’t perfectly aligned with Lumina’s primary goal—to increase the percentage of Americans with post-high school education credits from 45 percent to 60 percent.

http://www.xconomy.com/san-francisco/2017/02/20/lumina-foundation-gives-odds-for-edtech-innovation-under-trump/#

Share on Facebook