7 Warning Signs an Online Degree is a Scam

June 22nd, 2015

By Devon Haynie, US News

For prospective online students, searching for a degree program can sometimes feel like being adrift in the wilderness, with no map and no way of gauging the intention of approaching strangers. Students have so many online programs to choose from – some with promises of quick, effortless degrees that seem too good to be true. Unfortunately, they sometimes are. And students who are duped by the schemes are left with a hole in their wallet and no legitimate credential. While anyone can fall prey to an online degree scam, international students and first generation college students can be particularly vulnerable to degree mills, says Karen Pedersen, chief knowledge officer for the Online Learning Consortium, a group dedicated to advancing the quality of online learning. “If you don’t know what you don’t know, it can seem like a really intricate maze,” she says.

http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/articles/2015/06/09/7-warning-signs-an-online-degree-is-a-scam

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Report Finds Successful Online 2-Year College Courses in California

June 22nd, 2015

by Inside Higher Ed

The Public Policy Institute of California released a report Tuesday identifying successful online courses in the state’s community colleges. Success was defined as having at least 70 percent of students earning a passing grade, and if student performance is at least as good as face-to-face versions of the same course. The study also defined success as when students in an online course continue to do well in subsequent same-subject classes either online or in a traditional setting. The study found about 11 percent of online courses in 2013-14 were “highly successful” and they varied widely from one another. The courses were successful due to their design and the way they were delivered to students, although there wasn’t a systematic pattern in online course success.

https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2015/06/10/report-finds-successful-online-2-year-college-courses-california

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Coding Boot Camps Are on the Rise

June 22nd, 2015

by Meg Bernhard, Chronicle of Higher Ed

The unaccredited education programs known as coding boot camps are proliferating, and gaining more students. This year the number of graduates from such programs is expected to hit 16,000, up from 6,740 in 2014, according to a recent survey by Course Report, a business that focuses on the sector. At the boot camps, which are not affiliated with colleges or universities and which offer in-person instruction, students can work and study programming for 10 hours a day — or more — for months at a time. One such program, AIT Learning, based in Washington, D.C., says on its website that prospective students should expect to study 10 to 14 hours a day and to “work with peers till late and make some real-world programs.” The programs aren’t cheap, either. A summary of the Course Report survey notes that the average cost of the courses is more than $11,000. There are about 70 of the programs in the United States and Canada today.

http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/coding-boot-camps-are-on-the-rise/56915

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Cybersecurity Online Course Addressing Advanced Cybercrime and Security Threats

June 21st, 2015

by MIT

MIT Professional Education will offer its first online course on Cybersecurity to a global audience of professionals from Sept. 15 – Oct. 27, 2015. This course, featuring 14 faculty from the world-renowned MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), is offered in support of a campus-wide MIT initiative to counter the real and damaging threat of cybersecurity attacks facing organizations around the globe. Additional sessions of the course will also be offered from Nov. 10 – Dec. 22, 2015 and Jan. 12 – Feb. 23, 2016. The course launching on Sept. 15 is being offered at an introductory price of $545.

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20150609005477/en/MIT-Professional-Education-Launches-Online-Cybersecurity-Global#.VXeAxdJViko

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2-Year Colleges in Calif. Hope Online-Course Upgrades Will Improve Completion

June 21st, 2015

by Meg Bernhard, Chronicle of Higher Ed

Representatives of the California Community Colleges on Monday announced upgrades in their online-course system, the California Virtual Campus, that are intended to improve students’ completion rates. The college system said the effort was designed to make it easier for students to find courses that fulfill transfer requirements and create pathways to the California State University system. Among the improvements are a design that works better on mobile phones and includes an improved search function. The community-college system also has increased efforts to improve the quality of its online courses, to better prepare students to take such courses, and to train instructors to teach them. Those efforts fall broadly under the system’s Online Education Initiative.

http://chronicle.com/blogs/ticker/2-year-colleges-in-calif-hope-online-course-upgrades-will-improve-completion/100429

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Largest MOOC ever credits ELL

June 21st, 2015

By Meris Stansbury, eCampus News

Hundreds of thousands across the world enroll in a MOOC that targets English. The humanities aren’t often known for their pull when it comes to attracting a MOOC crowd, but one online learning platform may have found a global crowd pleaser with its current English Language Learning (ELL) course that’s quickly become the largest attended MOOC on record. The biggest single run of a free online course began on FutureLearn last month, with more than 400,000 learners enrolled from over 150 counties.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/top-news/largest-mooc-english-278/

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Can Digital Badges Help Encourage Professors to Take Teaching Workshops?

June 20th, 2015

by Jeffrey R. Young, Chronicle of Higher Ed

A few colleges are trying a new incentive to get professors to participate in professional-development workshops: digital badges. The idea of offering badges has become popular in education-technology circles in the past few years, in most cases as an alternative to a traditional college diploma, or even as a different way of giving grades in courses. The goal is to create an easy way for people to show employers they have attained a given skill. After all, who ever looks at a college transcript?

http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/can-digital-badges-help-encourage-professors-to-take-teaching-workshops/56901

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The Forces Behind The Decline Of For-Profit Colleges

June 20th, 2015

by ANYA KAMENETZ, NPR

Barring a last-minute legal decision, as of July 1, the nation’s for-profit colleges are going to be subject to a new Education Department rule known as gainful employment. That is: Do students end up earning enough to pay off their loans? A trade group of career colleges is suing to stop the rule, but this is far from the only monkey on the sector’s back. As recently as 2010, these schools enrolled one in nine college students. Today, some are shutting down, cutting back, tanking in the stock market, even going bankrupt. The bellwether was the giant Corinthian Colleges a year ago, but many others are in trouble as well. Even the University of Phoenix, which five years ago had 460,000 students, has seen that number fall by half.

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2015/06/08/412024783/the-forces-behind-the-decline-of-for-profit-colleges

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Raspberry Pi + iPad = countless maker possibilities

June 20th, 2015

By Mike Amante, eSchool News

pi-ipadPart of the magic of the magic of the iPad are all the great apps that can turn them into so much more than a tablet. With the maker movement in schools in full force across the country, it seems like students everywhere are excited and interested in learning about programming, electronics, robotics, and more. When apps can help them make and learn, all the better. How can these two ideas be melded together to create a stellar learning experience? This is where the Raspberry Pi, a small credit card size computer that was created in England just a few years ago, comes in. The Raspberry Pi, which runs an open source Linux operating system, was created with the intention of teaching programming and computer science concepts to students. The beauty of the Pi is that you can plug it into a TV or monitor, add a keyboard, and you have a fully functional computer for under $40.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2015/06/08/raspberry-pi-ipad-136/

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Blended Online And Campus Learning Embraced As B-Schools Face Disruption

June 19th, 2015

by Seb Murray, Business Because

Evolution of online learning forces business schools to rethink how they deliver content, as competition with innovative digital providers heats up. The digital revolution in education is in full swing, spearheaded by online companies deploying technology that is disrupting the sector with courses on everything from data analytics to advanced accounting. Digitally focused education companies such as Coursera, the Mooc or massive open online course developer and 2U, whose tech powers business school programs on the web, have emerged in the past decade along with dozens more who are shaking up the traditional university. The evolution of online learning has forced business schools to rethink how they deliver their content. Tech has enabled schools to provide flexible learning solutions by beaming lectures directly to computers and mobile devices.

http://www.businessbecause.com/news/mba-distance-learning/3305/blended-online-and-campus-learning-embraced

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Online education partnerships increasingly popular among employers

June 19th, 2015

By Tara García Mathewson, Education Dive

Employers are increasingly seeing the promise of free schooling as a worthwhile benefit to offer employees. The New Hampshire Union Leader reports that Southern New Hampshire University is the latest to forge such a partnership, this time with health insurance company Anthem Inc., opening its online degree programs to 55,000 Anthem employees nationwide in the second stage of a pilot program that began in-state. According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, analysts see this move, along with other recent partnerships by Starbucks and Fiat Chrysler, as the beginning of a trend toward employer-directed degree attainment.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/online-education-partnerships-increasingly-popular-among-employers/400174/

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New Report Outlines Ways to Implement Competency-Based Learning

June 19th, 2015

by Education World

A new report from CompetencyWorks called Implementing Competency Education in K-12 Systems: Insights from Local Leaders outlines effective ways districts have and can implement personalized learning models that meet individual student needs and teach competency-based skills. “This paper highlights strategies to engage, motivate, and teach all students to proficiency and mastery; depicts shifts in instruction toward deeper learning and meaningful assessments for learning; while exploring models of distributed leadership and educator empowerment,” according to the International Association for K-12 Online Learning.

http://www.educationworld.com/a_news/new-report-outlines-ways-implement-competency-based-learning-702222762

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A clearer role for MOOCs

June 18th, 2015

By Clea Simon, Harvard Gazette

Massive open online courses, or MOOCS, will not destroy the university as we know it, says Lawrence S. Bacow, member of the Harvard Corporation and former president of Tufts University. While this burgeoning educational trend may seem poised to undercut four-year residential colleges, it may not be the cost-conscious alternative it seems. But it may offer new opportunities — and new ideas — to revitalize higher education. This new technology must be understood to be utilized properly by universities — and by informed consumers. For starters, despite the apparent cost savings, online learning is actually expensive. Like most startups, it currently lacks a coherent business model, with the vast majority of costs falling to the university, or content provider. In addition to the expense of creating a class — including faculty training and salary — online learning requires up-to-date technological infrastructure to optimize delivery.

http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2015/06/a-clearer-role-for-moocs/

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How to Keep Learning as a Busy CEO

June 18th, 2015

by Chuck Cohn, Forbes

Few CEOs would dispute the importance of continuing education and professional development for their team members. However, those same CEOs may be wondering how they can fit learning into their own days when each hour seems to be populated with meetings, progress reports, and pressing commitments. This challenge described my own situation during my first years as the CEO of Varsity Tutors. On some days, it still does. In recent years, I have been introduced to or found several resources that can help a busy CEO keep learning and growing professionally and personally.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/chuckcohn/2015/06/05/how-to-keep-learning-as-a-busy-ceo/

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Daphne Koller on the Future of Online Education

June 18th, 2015

by Alexandra Wolfe, Wall Street Journal

For now, Dr. Koller is looking forward to launching the online M.B.A. program. In it, students can get a full M.B.A. for a targeted cost of around $20,000, or choose blocks of expertise, such as digital marketing or accounting, in which to earn certificates (cost: $79 each). She also plans to continue expanding the company internationally by acquiring courses in different languages. Ultimately, Dr. Koller wants to make the school experience like “turning the tap—and great education comes out for anybody.” Eventually, “we’ll have data from hundreds of thousands, millions of people at a level that’s unprecedented,” she says. “I think we’re at the cusp of a revolution of treating human learning as science.”

http://www.wsj.com/articles/daphne-koller-on-the-future-of-online-education-1433532321

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High School Seniors Easily Cheat in Flawed Online Education Program

June 17th, 2015

BY MOLLY BLOOM, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Proponents of combining online and in-person teaching say it works for students who don’t learn by sitting through lectures, but critics say seniors at Atlanta’s Crim High School Googled their way to diplomas. Some seniors at Atlanta’s Crim High School Googled their way to diplomas this spring, looking up the answers to test questions on the internet while enrolled in a flawed online education pilot program, teachers told the Atlanta school board. Students in the pilot took classes in school computer labs supervised by teachers. The teachers were also available to help them with lessons, district accountability chief Bill Caritj said. Some of the seniors were catching up before graduation; others were taking courses for the first time, he said. But some teachers and parents said students cheated their way through the coursework in order to earn credit.

http://www.govtech.com/education/High-School-Seniors-Easily-Cheat-in-Flawed-Online-Education-Program.html

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The 4 Cs of Tech Implementation

June 17th, 2015

By Julie Davis, THE Journal

“The 4 Cs of Tech Implementation”: critical thinking, creativity, communication and collaboration. In other words, we will be looking at what can happen in the classroom when technology integration is implemented. I do not believe these things only happen in a tech-rich environment, I am just sharing firsthand with you what I have seen happen when technology is involved.

http://thejournal.com/articles/2015/06/04/the-4-cs-of-tech-implementation.aspx

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Educators From Every UNC System University Expand Online Teaching Abilities

June 17th, 2015

By Amanda Wilcox, Times Warner Cable News

UNC system teachers from across the state are learning more about online teaching as the new education avenue continues to expand across the U.S. The National Center for Education Statistics reports more than 46,000 students took classes exclusively online through North Carolina universities in 2012. This week, 28 teachers from every UNC school are in Wilmington for the Instructional Innovation Incubator (i3) conference to learn more about teaching online. “Most of them have never taught online before. So they are brave and they are very motivated to learn more about teaching in online environments,” said Diana Ashe, with the UNCW Center for Teaching Excellence. The week-long conference is giving the instructors the opportunity to develop their own online courses. Thursday, they also learned about the tools available to them.

http://www.twcnews.com/nc/north-carolina/education/2015/06/4/educators-from-every-unc-university-expand-online-teaching-abilities.html

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Adult learning in the computer age: Teaching makes transformation in the online world

June 16th, 2015

by MARTIN VAN DEN HEMEL, Richmond Review

For adult learners eager to rechart their career path, or simply wanting to bolster their resumes, the learning options are virtually endless. From the continuing education offerings by the Richmond School District, to the Third Age Learning program at Kwantlen Polytechnic University—where quizzes/grades/prerequisites are shunned in favour of discussion/humour/insight—the way people are accessing information and knowledge is different from even a decade ago. “For people interested in learning new things, there are more options than ever,” Michael Khoo, head of the Richmond School District’s continuing education program, said. The Richmond School District is gradually phasing out face-to-face teaching in its adult continuing education program, offering instead six-week online courses that begin every month and start at $119, and are monitored by an instructor who is available to answer questions and guide students along.

http://www.richmondreview.com/community/local-community/adult-learning-in-the-computer-age-1.1957979

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Smart Poor Kids Are Less Likely to Graduate From College Than Middling Rich Kids

June 16th, 2015

By Jordan Weissmann, Slate

In case you needed a reminder that the deck is stacked against poor kids in this country, University of Michigan professor Susan Dynarski has offered a simple and grim illustration of that fact at the New York Times. In 2002, the Department of Education began tracking a large, nationally representative group of high school sophomores, whom it tested for math and reading skills. Ten years later, the agency found a troubling, though not exactly surprising, pattern. At every level of academic ability, the low-income students were less likely to finish college than their wealthier peers. Yet more depressing: Exceptionally smart poor kids, whose math scores ranked them among the top quarter of the study’s participants, were no more likely to attain a bachelor’s degree than scholastically middling rich kids.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2015/06/02/college_graduation_rates_for_low_income_students_why_poor_kids_drop_out.html

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6 Telltale Signs of Disruptive Innovation

June 16th, 2015

by Rhea Kelly, CampusTechnology

In her keynote address at the CT Forum conference in April, Michelle Weise, senior research fellow at the Clayton Christensen Institute for Disruptive Innovation, offered an insightful analysis of disruptive innovation — perhaps one of the most-used and least-understood buzzwords in higher education today. Weise gave an overview of what the term means and how it has played out in higher ed and other industries, but at the core of her talk were six defining characteristics of disruptive innovations — telltale signs worth posting on the wall of every IT leader’s office

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/06/02/6-telltale-signs-of-disruptive-innovation.aspx

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