Techno-News Blog

August 2, 2020

Sending AI Off to School

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Dian Schaffhauser, THE Journal
Plenty of discussions about the use of artificial intelligence talk about how AI could help educators by shrinking the amount of time they have to spend on the trivia that pervades their work and freeing them up to focus on the job of teaching. In the latest CoSN IT leadership survey, more than half of respondents (55 percent) said that AI would have a significant or even transformational impact on teaching and learning within the next five years, if privacy issues can be addressed to everybody’s satisfaction.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2020/07/08/sending-ai-off-to-school.aspx

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Half of colleges will require faculty training for an online fall, report finds

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Jeremy Bauer-Wolf, Education Dive

While more than three-quarters of colleges’ chief online officers deemed the abrupt transition to virtual classes earlier this year to be largely or very successful, half said their schools will require faculty training in remote learning this fall, according to a new report. The annual Changing Landscape of Online Education (CHLOE 5) survey polled 308 college COOs in May. Three-quarters of officials said poorly prepared faculty presented the biggest challenge pivoting to online learning this spring, and 62% said it was underprepared students. As the pandemic persists and more institutions forgo in-person instruction this fall, they will be looking for ways to improve their online offerings.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/half-of-colleges-will-require-faculty-training-for-an-online-fall-report-f/582007/

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Landscape of post-pandemic transnational higher education

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Agustian Sutrisno, University World News
The COVID-19 pandemic impacts the landscape of transnational higher education (TNHE) in three dimensions: student mobility, economic recession and international political tension. As a health catastrophe, COVID-19 affects cross-border mobility, opening up opportunities for TNHE to absorb the demand for international qualifications. The 1997 Asian Financial Crisis shows how TNHE may come into its own during a recession. However, the international political climate is less than certain and TNHE providers are facing a landscape filled with rising nationalistic rhetoric and self-serving interest.

https://www.universityworldnews.com/post.php?story=20200714143605966

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August 1, 2020

Looking towards the future: Automation, training, and the middle class

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Marcus Casey, Brookings Institution

Automation and artificial intelligence (AI) are projected to either replace or fundamentally change human effort in many occupations. Some jobs may become obsolete. But the potential gains in productivity and efficiency from these technologies will likely transform legacy industries and lead to the emergence of new industries, generating new tasks and jobs. Displaced workers and new labor market entrants alike will therefore need to invest in skills and knowledge that complement these technologies.

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/up-front/2020/07/22/looking-towards-the-future-automation-training-and-the-middle-class/

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Free and Discounted Ed Tech Tools for Online Learning During the Coronavirus Pandemic (Updated July 24, 2020)

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Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology
As more and more colleges and universities have shut down their campuses in an effort to curb the spread of COVID-19, education technology companies have stepped forward to help move student learning to the virtual realm. Some companies are making their paid services free through the rest of the school year; others are lifting limits to services and/or adding premium features to what’s free. The following list will be updated regularly as announcements are made.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2020/05/06/updated-free-and-discounted-ed-tech-tools-for-online-learning-during-the-coronavirus-pandemic.aspx

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Public colleges are the workhorses of Middle-Class Mobility

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Brookings Institution
In 2018, private, four-year colleges accounted for just 20 percent of total freshman enrollment, as compared to 45 percent for public, four-year colleges and universities.[1] Public four-years go beyond enrolling many students, however – they are the workhorses of upward mobility for the middle class. In our new report, which draws on data produced by Opportunity Insights, we show that students who attend college – particularly a four-year college – are significantly more likely to experience upward mobility in adulthood, relative to their parents’ position in the income distribution, than nonattenders.

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/up-front/2020/07/22/public-colleges-are-the-workhorses-of-middle-class-mobility/

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July 31, 2020

Library offers free online courses to help the unemployed

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By LINDA MCINTOSH, San Diego Union-Tribune

The Oceanside Public Library, which is temporarily closed because of the pandemic, provides free online courses to help folks who lost their jobs.  The courses are offered through the Coursera for Workforce Recovery program. The courses range from computer programming, digital literacy, data analytics/business analysis and software or app development to entrepreneurship, web design project management, marketing and business English among others.

https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/north-county-community-news/story/2020-07-21/library-offers-free-online-courses-to-help-the-unemployed

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Students Think Online College Should Cost Less

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Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology
A single-question survey of more than 17,000 incoming college students across the United States and Canada has found that students believe online courses don’t have the same value as the in-person experience. The vast majority of U.S. students — 93 percent — told surveyors that tuition should be lower for online programs. Another 6 percent said tuition should have an “opt out” for services and facilities that aren’t available. Less than half a percent suggested there should be no changes to tuition. In Canada, 88 percent of students felt tuition should be lower; 11 percent wanted an “opt out” option; and just under 1 percent thought there should be no changes.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2020/07/21/students-think-online-college-should-cost-less.aspx

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Analysis finds 6,300 coronavirus cases tied to US colleges

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Natalie Schwartz, Education Dive

More than 6,300 coronavirus cases are tied to U.S. colleges and universities, according to a recent New York Times analysis. The Times surveyed every public, four-year college, as well as elite private research universities and schools that compete in Division I sports. The publication found at least 14 deaths related to the virus at colleges and 11 institutions that have seen 100 or more cases. The findings suggest the coronavirus is spreading on campuses ahead of the fall term — a foreboding sign for colleges that plan to bring students back amid the pandemic.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/analysis-finds-6300-coronavirus-cases-tied-to-us-colleges/582561/

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July 30, 2020

Multiple Digital Learning Modes to Optimize Class

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Ray Schroeder, Inside Higher Ed
As many of us prepare for a digitally delivered fall term, we should consider the variety of options that can be employed in our classes, enabling flexibility and optimizing learning outcomes. These COVID-19 times are disrupting our lives, our work and our learning. They force us to find new ways to deliver our curriculum and to best connect with our learners at a distance. For many, remote teaching at the end of the spring term and summer session was little more than firing up a Zoom session to synchronously deliver classroom sessions. Unfortunately, this was less than satisfying to many faculty members and students. It left some with a distant feeling that was less personal and less engaged than they had felt in the prior face-to-face model. Fortunately, there are many more online options than merely turning on the camera.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/blogs/online-trending-now/multiple-digital-learning-modes-optimize-class

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How to Improve Remote Learning Experiences

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Eileen, Bielestock, EdTech

Classroom teachers and support professionals are especially burdened with the responsibility of sustaining academic growth and the well-being of their students in the new normal. With Wi-Fi hotspots and routers temporarily replacing brick-and-mortar walls, educators and students still need to connect, engage in exciting learning opportunities, strengthen and build skills, and explore and personalize learning with project-based activities. As committed educators, teachers and support professionals seek to continue using data to drive instruction, assess for mastery, differentiate based on learning abilities and styles, develop relationships, and care for the emotional and physical well-being of their students.

https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2020/07/how-improve-remote-learning-experiences

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How colleges with hybrid instruction this fall can support online students

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Natalie Schwartz, Education Dive

Using the right technology, setting clear expectations and being mindful of the differences between in-person and remote learning are key, experts say. As colleges release their plans for the fall semester, even those hoping to reopen their campuses are leaning heavily on remote instruction to spread out students and give them more options. Under some hybrid models, instructors will teach classes in person and simultaneously livestream those lessons to remote students.  But it can be tough to ensure remote and in-person students get the same quality of education when they take classes together. Here’s how several ed tech and higher education experts say colleges can prepare for a hybrid fall.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/how-colleges-with-hybrid-instruction-this-fall-can-support-online-students/582141/

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July 29, 2020

ADA Compliance for Online Course Design

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Sheryl Burgstahler, EDUCAUSE
Lessons learned from campuses nationwide have informed an approach to compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act during the process of online course design. Providing multiple ways for students to gain knowledge, demonstrate knowledge, and interact goes a long way toward making a course accessible to all students, including those with disabilities. Accessibility efforts benefit not only students with disabilities but also students who are English language learners and those working in noisy or quiet environments.

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/1/ada-compliance-for-online-course-design

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A Rubric for Evaluating E-Learning Tools in Higher Education

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Lauren Anstey and Gavan Watson, EDUCAUSE
The Rubric for E-Learning Tool Evaluation offers educators a framework, with criteria and levels of achievement, to assess the suitability of an e-learning tool for their learners’ needs and for their own learning outcomes and classroom context.

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2018/9/a-rubric-for-evaluating-e-learning-tools-in-higher-education

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The Difference Between Emergency Remote Teaching and Online Learning

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EDUCAUSE
Well-planned online learning experiences are meaningfully different from courses offered online in response to a crisis or disaster. Colleges and universities working to maintain instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic should understand those differences when evaluating this emergency remote teaching.

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2020/3/the-difference-between-emergency-remote-teaching-and-online-learning

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July 28, 2020

Continuous learning is important to Gen Z, Millennials

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BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News

Continuous learning helps generations feel fulfilled, accomplished–but many young adults feel pressured to learn new skills. When it comes to updating professional skills, continuous learning is more important to Millennials and adult Gen Zers than to Gen Xers and Baby Boomers, according to a survey. More than half of Millennials (58 percent) and adult Gen Zers (52 percent) said success in their careers depends on updating their skills and knowledge frequently, compared with 35 percent of Gen Xers and 34 percent of Baby Boomers.

https://www.ecampusnews.com/2020/07/20/continuous-learning-is-important-to-gen-z-millennials/

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7 Things You Should Know About the HyFlex Course Model

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EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative

The hybrid flexible, or HyFlex, course format is an instructional approach that combines face-to-face (F2F) and online learning. Each class session and learning activity is offered in-person, synchronously online, and asynchronously online. Students can decide how to participate. The flexibility of the HyFlex model demonstrates a commitment to student success, and that flexibility can also enable institutions to maintain educational and research activities during a disruption. The 7 Things You Should Know About… series from the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) provides concise information on emerging learning technologies.

https://library.educause.edu/resources/2020/7/7-things-you-should-know-about-the-hyflex-course-model

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5 Bigger and Better Ideas for Fall 2020

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José Antonio Bowen, Inside Higher Ed
It’s time for campus leaders to start generating more innovative options for fall 2020, which means considering some wilder ideas. Any way you slice it, this fall is going to be hard on everyone. Higher education institutions are desperate for some tuition revenue, but we all know we are not offering the usual college experience.  Part of the problem is that we always want to replicate rather than innovate. Forget about the past. This disruption is real and massive. It is time for campus leaders to look at some wilder ideas — even some beyond the 15 scenarios Joshua Kim and Edward Maloney have proposed.

https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2020/07/20/college-leaders-should-consider-some-outside-box-ideas-fall-2020-opinion

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July 27, 2020

How Designing Accessible Curriculum For All Can Help Make Online Learning More Equitable

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Paul Darvasi, WQED

Some educators who want to make online learning more engaging and accessible are exploring the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework. UDL – originally developed by researchers at the Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST) in collaboration with Harvard University – supports special education students, but its flexibility, technology guidelines and aim to individualize learning are best practices that can serve every student. “While UDL can benefit students with disabilities, it’s a way of thinking about how to make instruction accessible for all,” said Kavita Rao, a professor in the department of special education at the University of Hawai‘i.

https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/56205/how-designing-accessible-curriculum-for-all-can-help-make-online-learning-more-equitable

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The Ethics of Reopening

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Rev. Dennis H. Holtschneider,  President of the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities, Inside Higher Ed
Pandemics rightly invite the language of science and best practice when it comes to the choices we make. If you listen, however, there’s another conversation of right and wrong and assignments of “Who is responsible?” It’s the language of ethics and morality, and, in that vein, I’ve been ruminating on the ethics of colleges and universities reopening for the fall term. Here’s a baker’s dozen.

https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2020/07/21/ethical-issues-colleges-and-universities-must-confront-when-considering-reopening

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What’s Next for Remote Learning?

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Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed
Colleges spent millions of dollars facilitating the pivot from face-to-face to remote instruction last spring. Administrators who oversee online learning don’t want that investment to go to waste. The Changing Landscape of Online Education (CHLOE) report, published today, is the fifth in a series of annual surveys on online learning conducted by Quality Matters and Eduventures. This report, however, focuses specifically on the pivot to remote teaching that occurred this past spring. The report includes responses from 308 chief online officers at two- and four-year public, private nonprofit and for-profit institutions.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2020/07/21/survey-hints-long-term-impact-spring-pivot-remote-learning

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